Hello wine experts,

I need some tips on creating a low-cost wine storage area in the basement of my new home to store about 300 bottles in racks.

In my previous house (100 y/o building) the basement had a "cold room" that would ony fluctuate from about 40F in the winter to 65F in the summer. My new house has a normal basement and the only spare room I have is a small utility/furnace room with normal stud and drywall walls and a door to close it off. Has anyone found a way to keep this kind of room cool enough for wine storage without spending a fortune on high-tech climate equippemnt? What other targets should I have for such a room?

I don't have a high-dollar collection (most are in the $25-$95/bottle range) but I do enjoy my wines and I would like many of them to last for a few years to come.

Thanks for your help Smile
Original Post
My guess would be near a furnace is not a good idea. A furnace is going to put off some heat, so some type of barrier between the furnace and wine will be needed. other than that I would say you need to monitor the temp before storing your wine down there. I keep my wine, (and I don't collect, I only buy to drink and store it for short periods of time a month tops), in a closet in my lower level laundry room of my tri-level so it is almost a basement, even with the dryer and furnace (both are 6-8 feet away from the door) in there the temp never rises above 68 in that closet, and usually stays between 60-65. THats the best I can do for you!

Z
I would insulate the heck out of it, provide some barrier to the furnace and consider a cheap A/C unit for the summer months if the temp rises a bit too much for you liking. I have a friend who simply did just that in a block garage and he stores 30 year old + Bordeaux, etc. with no issues.

But I agree with zerwitt, test it out for a while before you invest a bunch of cash. The most important thing is that you don't have a huge fluctuation of temp. and to a lesser extent humidity.
Can't agree more, insulate like crazy...use tyvek or some other moisture barrier. You can then use some simple cedar planking (1" x 6" or similar) for the walls and some pergo-like stuff for the floor. Will look great, protect your wine, and won't cost an arm and a leg.
My cellar is in my basement and the heater is in the room. I built my cellar and insulated it with 2 inch thick styrofoam except where is contacts the below ground walls and floor. Temperature is 57-59 in summer and 53-55 in winter.
R332 I think most would tell you to keep it at 55 degrees, and I keep mine at 55 degrees. However, for 10 years and under, I think you would be okay to keep it at 60/62 degrees with minimal fluctuation.
R332,
What do you mean by it’s a “normal basement”?
How many of the basement walls are subterranean?
What part of the country do you live in?
Do you have any daylight basement walls and which direction do they face (north, south, etc.)?

I’m willing to bet that your basement gets much hotter than 65F during the day in the middle of the summer when no one is home and the AC is not running.

If you have an exposed wall with a window in the basement, an easy and inexpensive means to mechanically cool your basement is to purchase a new, oversized, window AC unit. Most of the better & new window units can have their thermostat set to cool all the way down to 60F or lower. You can also trick the unit in to cooling even lower by putting a heat source (like a light bulb or a resistor) near the sensor. The only downside to these units is no humidity control. But if you are in the southeast like me, low humidity is never a problem.
Hello,

Thanks for the reply....I will reply below in your post Smile

What do you mean by it’s a “normal basement”?
How many of the basement walls are subterranean?

>>All of the walls are deep in the ground and the room in question doesn't have a window.

What part of the country do you live in?

>>Western Canada....very low humidity and a HOT summer day is 85F!


I’m willing to bet that your basement gets much hotter than 65F during the day in the middle of the summer when no one is home and the AC is not running.

>>You might be right. I don't move in to this house for another few weeks so I can only base my temp guesses off my previous house.

If you have an exposed wall with a window in the basement, an easy and inexpensive means to mechanically cool your basement is to purchase a new, oversized, window AC unit.

>>There are short windows in the basement but this would mean cooling the entire basement unless I could duct the cool air into the small "wine room".

Thanks for the help!
Canada is a much better place to have a passive basement than the US Southeast. Big Grin

Consider building a small wine cellar in the basement against the north/northeast walls (or whichever walls are the most subterranean) using deep studs (for additional insulation thickness) and use a vapor barrier throughout. If you are not concerned about the appearance or if this will not be a social gathering place and you are not handy with home remodelling work, you can finish the studs with inexpensive paneling or even leave the interior walls unfinished. The most difficult part for most is running power for lights and outlets.

I would be very careful about using a window AC unit venting into the basement if you do not have plenty of fresh air being pumped into the basement via a modern central AC unit.

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