i came home yeterday from piedmont. i was there with my friends david and oliver and tsunamine.

a side we tasted some wine (best were:
- 1996 giacosa falletto reserva
- 2001 c. francia conterno

i got from 2 sources some white truffles.

when we arrived back home yesterday i prepared dinner with, a salcicca con porri and a mash-potato with truffles.

i also like tho get a scrambled egg with truffles even more than over tagliatelle.

what about you?
Original Post
Last time I cooked with white truffles I served venison with wild mushrooms and truffles.

Rough recipe from memory

Stir fry strips of venison over a high heat. reserve the meat when cooked.

Reduce heat and add a significant amount of butter to the pan and then add sliced morels chantarelles and bolettes.

When mushrooms are cooked add cream, sliced truffles and game stock (or reserved reconstituting water if using dried mushrooms).

When heated through return the venison to the pan and simmer over a gentle heat for 5 minutes or so.

Serve in shallow soup bowls with rounds of lightly toasted bread in the bottom of the bowl.
I like truffles, black or white, on and in risotto. I also like them in scrambled eggs. I've had roasted chicken with thin slices of black truffle forced under the skin, and later more shaved over the served meat. I think those are the only 3 ways I've ever had them, but I have to say Pauly's recipe above sounds delicious.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
I think those are the only 3 ways I've ever had them, but I have to say Pauly's recipe above sounds delicious.


Thanks seaquam,

Just a few pointers I didn't cover in my initial post.
1) Use creme fraiche, not regular cream
2) Venison, or similar game meat, works a lot better than beef if you were tempted to substitute.
3) I almost never use salt and pepper in my cooking, so if you feel the need you can add those in.
4) Dried mushrooms work a treat, so don't feel the need to search out fresh mushrooms. It is important to use field mushrooms for robustness of flavour rather than the normal farmed varieties.

I was using a very heavily modified recipe, so I don't have exact measures available.

The three methods you quoted are some of the most classical way to treat truffles, and are classics for very good reasons.

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