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Who's in for some Hatch chili's this year? Last year was my first exposure and my chili verde's have never been better. Looks like I'll have to wait another 2 1/2 weeks to get some, but once I do, I'll probably get a 50lb assorted box as last years 10lbs didn't even make it to the winter months. Only problem is my tomatillos are coming in now. Hope there are enough for a good batch of chili at the end of the month.
Well I learned something today. I had no idea what these were. I happened to be looking at the circular from the supermarket and right on the front it says "Hatch Chilies, 99 cents/lb". I would have put it in the recycling bin w/out a second thought and then I saw this thread and the link to the earlier one.

Who knew? So I'm getting some and we'll see what we can do with them. I bought some buffalo last night so maybe I'll try to figure something out, maybe grill them both tonight? Thanks for the new found knowledge.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Well I learned something today. I had no idea what these were. I happened to be looking at the circular from the supermarket and right on the front it says "Hatch Chilies, 99 cents/lb". I would have put it in the recycling bin w/out a second thought and then I saw this thread and the link to the earlier one.

Who knew? So I'm getting some and we'll see what we can do with them. I bought some buffalo last night so maybe I'll try to figure something out, maybe grill them both tonight? Thanks for the new found knowledge.


a popular taiwanese dish is to take sirloin and cut into strips.

take chilis and do same

stir fry with garlic (which is fried in oil first before inserting meat and chilis)

insert into https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaobing
with a touch of hoisen sauce.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Well I learned something today. I had no idea what these were. I happened to be looking at the circular from the supermarket and right on the front it says "Hatch Chilies, 99 cents/lb". I would have put it in the recycling bin w/out a second thought and then I saw this thread and the link to the earlier one.

Who knew? So I'm getting some and we'll see what we can do with them. I bought some buffalo last night so maybe I'll try to figure something out, maybe grill them both tonight? Thanks for the new found knowledge.


Bison stuffed chili relleno is really good. I've also done bison burgers with roasted hatch mixed in the meat.
G-man that's what I normally do with chiles and steak but I eat it with tortillas or flatbread but it if the shaobing is kind of sweet, it should be great.

W+A - you don't even know. My wife would move to Santa Fe in a heartbeat. Her favorite "city". I, on the other hand, have never been. So we may come visit one day in the not to distant future, since she says I have to see it.

She doesn't eat chilies though, Hatch or otherwise.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
G-man that's what I normally do with chiles and steak but I eat it with tortillas or flatbread but it if the shaobing is kind of sweet, it should be great.

W+A - you don't even know. My wife would move to Santa Fe in a heartbeat. Her favorite "city". I, on the other hand, have never been. So we may come visit one day in the not to distant future, since she says I have to see it.

She doesn't eat chilies though, Hatch or otherwise.


no shaobing shoudl be salty the hoisan is sweet
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
We are doing a lot of programming this summer on peppers. One that I brought home (left over from the events) is a Trinidad Moruga Scorpion. Has anyone tried this, or even know how to use it? It is reputed to be 1-2 million Scoville units.


I just harvested and tried my first Moruga scorpion on Tuesday and it is the hottest pepper I've ever tried to date. Nasty heat and sting that lingers for almost an hour just for a little piece with rib. Today my family and staff tried a seed and it blew everyone away straight to the ice cream pail. Next week my first Carolina Reapers will be served... Eat'em and Reap!


explode
1/2 lb scorpion peppers

leave stems on, cut half, plck out seeds

wear gloves.

5 lbs of tomatoes
1 onion
8 tblspn of garlic
1 cup of vinegar -- i use a little less typically because i dotn like em sour
1/8 cup of worchestire
1 can of tomato paste
1.5 cups + of molasses (sweetness to taste)

cook ingredients down (without the pepper) when half the liquid disappears
taste, it should be touch sour, savory, sweet and salty.

Add peppers at this point when you're satisfied witht eh base and cook everything down some more until the mixture thickens a little more.

stick in blender and you have one heck of a hot sauce where teh hot sneaks up on you because of the molasses.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:


W+A - you don't even know. My wife would move to Santa Fe in a heartbeat. Her favorite "city". I, on the other hand, have never been. So we may come visit one day in the not to distant future, since she says I have to see it.

She doesn't eat chilies though, Hatch or otherwise.


Greg, let us know. We would love to have you over to our place for wine and dinner.

BTW, my wife and I also do not really enjoy chilies. Santa Fe has excellent French, Spanish and Italian chef owned places we enjoy a great deal. There are also Southwestern chef owned places if you like, just not our preferred style overall.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
1/2 lb scorpion peppers

leave stems on, cut half, plck out seeds

wear gloves.

5 lbs of tomatoes
1 onion
8 tblspn of garlic
1 cup of vinegar -- i use a little less typically because i dotn like em sour
1/8 cup of worchestire
1 can of tomato paste
1.5 cups + of molasses (sweetness to taste)

cook ingredients down (without the pepper) when half the liquid disappears
taste, it should be touch sour, savory, sweet and salty.

Add peppers at this point when you're satisfied witht eh base and cook everything down some more until the mixture thickens a little more.

stick in blender and you have one heck of a hot sauce where teh hot sneaks up on you because of the molasses.


Have to try this! Thanks!
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
The pain from the Carolina Reaper chile is beyond anything possibly envisioned. Even ice cubes didn't blunt the burning inside and it took half an hour to finally become bearable. Too much fun...


Ice cubes would only make things worse! High fat ice cream is the best cure. Sugar, dairy and fat all combat effectively.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
The pain from the Carolina Reaper chile is beyond anything possibly envisioned. Even ice cubes didn't blunt the burning inside and it took half an hour to finally become bearable. Too much fun...


Ice cubes would only make things worse! High fat ice cream is the best cure. Sugar, dairy and fat all combat effectively.

I've heard that with these extreme chilies, even that doesn't help.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
The pain from the Carolina Reaper chile is beyond anything possibly envisioned. Even ice cubes didn't blunt the burning inside and it took half an hour to finally become bearable. Too much fun...


Ice cubes would only make things worse! High fat ice cream is the best cure. Sugar, dairy and fat all combat effectively.

I've heard that with these extreme chilies, even that doesn't help.


I was given a really nice Moruga scorpion last summer which I cut in quarters and had with three other guys. One started to hyperventilate on purpose, actively trying to make himself pass out to get away from the pain.
Capsaicin stimulates the release of serotonin and dopamine. At a real basic level it acts on the brain much like an opiate.

I read one study that linked the new super hot high breeds to a kind of dual action drug. The intense heat and burning causes extreme mental and physical focus, you're only focused on the experience and forget all other stimuli and distractions(think of everyone you know with some degree of ADD or cell phone distraction who could stand to focus), followed by the release of serotonin and dopamine which gives you a sense of calm and well being.

That's some awesome ass stuff if you ask me Smile I suspect if it wasn't grown for about $150 a ton there might be much more medical research on the benefits.
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Call me stupid, but I just flat-out don't get trying extremely hot chiles. I don't! Why go through the pain? Can someone explain? And don't give me the, "I like the flavor..." thing.

I do like the flavor (of certain chiles), but I do not like the pain, so there's only so far I will go. Dopamine be damned.

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