It's a brand new year, and I've just seasoned up my brand new maple cutting board. It's gonna be a great year for cooking! Well, it'll be a great year for chopping, anyway.
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by Dom'n'Vin'sDad:
I got a couple new Boos Blocks. Very happy!


I too was gonna pick up a couple of Boos. however I ended up refinishing the existing blocks. So that leads me to ask, what do you usually do with your butcher blocks maintenance wise? and how frequently do you replace them?
Oil them every so often.

Hopefully I won't ever have to replace these!

The ones I am replacing are cheaper ones that have cracked, and another that I have taken to the cabin.
quote:
Originally posted by Dom'n'Vin'sDad:
Oil them every so often.

Hopefully I won't ever have to replace these!

The ones I am replacing are cheaper ones that have cracked, and another that I have taken to the cabin.


I was hoping to hear that. Other than surface slashes and I'm not sure what brand I have, they have held up fine. Eventually Boos may be in order.
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
It's a brand new year, and I've just seasoned up my brand new maple cutting board. It's gonna be a great year for cooking! Well, it'll be a great year for chopping, anyway.


How do you clean it? Try not to cut chicken and red meat on same board. Have a board on counter that I flip for 2 types of product.
I have found that a well seasoned maple cutting board works infinitely better than the tip of my ring finger....
This thread prompted me to investigate my board. I've been using a bamboo board and from what I've been reading, bamboo consists of several fine grains that must be glued, and it's this glue in the board that actually makes my knife's edges dull quicker. Seems Maple is the way to go, and preferably end grain boards are the best. I stopped by a local retailer of kitchen items, who carries several boards (including Boos). However the Boos boards in stock (while one size was about what I wanted) all were long grain and not end-grained. He also had an end-grain block board, the right size for me, but made from Teak wood. The board's manufacturer advertises this as an environmentally replenish able item and better because of that (err...isn't a maple tree replenish able?) So I either keep looking or order on-line. Another source I found was thebucherblocktop.com.

Any feedback from you guys regarding these items? Do you use end grain block boards? Do you notice a difference on your knive's blade life?
I use a piece of maple plank that I had left over from remodeling. I have another board that's just a piece of ash I think. No idea whether they dull the knives. When the knives are dull, I just sharpen them.
After a lot of research and shopping/comparing I just received, today, my new White Hard Maple end-grain chopping block. 20" x 16" x 2" including handling grooves, routered edge and rubber feet. Source is Molls Carpentry, in Turtle Creek, WI. He does several styles, all well done.

No affiliation, I just appreciate the high quality. Ordering was easy and filled/shipped quickly. Nothing but good to say about this transaction.

FYI to potential fellow Canadian buyers: I got stung with a $50 Border Brokerage Fee (the government's system, no fault of the source). Just beware and expect the hit.

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