quote:
Originally posted by ArieS:
The poor guy who started this thread must be wondering what's going on in here Smile


Most definately. Big Grin
MUCH success pairing chocolate with key limes. steve's makes a swingle(key lime pie dipped in chocolate and then frozen. on a stick. Eek) that simply rocks my world. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
MUCH success pairing chocolate with key limes.

And you know this how, being in brooklyn (other than doing a google search) ???? By the way, how are those key lime trees doing in your neck of the woods ?

Many stores in the Keys and S. Fla make the "chocolate dipped pie on a stick" but does that make them good ? Its called a novelty, as most other key lime products that are produced. In case you have never truly had a FRESH squeezed key lime, they have a distinct bitter taste, that if not squeezed from a truly fresh key lime and unadulterated, can be quite off-putting. Most of the oddball items made with key lime juice here (cookies, cake, candy, juices, sauces, marinades, key lime ade, etc.) have been so commercialized and masked by other flavors that you would not know its made from the key lime. They are more of a marketing ploy for the tourist/visitor to purchase a "piece of the South Florida/Keys life", just like those miniature resin alligator figurines.

Does anybody see the trend that its the native floridians dissing the key lime/chocolate mixture (the people who grew up and/or live where the key lime IS) while the people living thousands of miles away promoting it ? Hmmmmm...
Last edited by inky
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
The Food Mafia never rests, it waits. Roll Eyes

..to take all of you out (we use key lime cement shoes here) Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by inky:
[And you know this how, being in brooklyn (other than doing a google search) ???? By the way, how are those key lime trees doing in your neck of the woods ?
You do know that it's 2008 don't you? Have you ever heard of this new invention called the airplane? Roll Eyes For the right price it is possible to get fresh anything anywhere.
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
the key lime/chocolate thing in the keys is horrid, they do use concentrate. steve's doesn't. see VT's post as to how that happens(wow, modern technology dinky. who'd a thunk'd it? Big Grin)...

maybe dinky should try researching before he inserts foot in mouth. or ass.


I still think its unconscionable, but to each his own. If people enjoy it...so be it, I'm just not gonna ruin my key lime with chocolate, but certainly don't care if others do.

Some people go out to a high end steak house, order the aged bone-in ribeye, have it cooked to medium well and use A-1 sauce. They paid for it, and enjoy it that way, but I'd never do that!
Anybody know how they're prepared in Southeast Asia, where the "key lime," Citrus aurantiifolia is actually from? Razz
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
<crickets>


Ask someone from Southeast Asia! Maybe they use them to make a ceviche like dish.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Anybody know how they're prepared in Southeast Asia, where the "key lime," Citrus aurantiifolia is actually from? Razz

Since you started the history, you should have finished:

Key Limes (Citrus aurantifolia) are the fruit of tropical citrus tree closely related to lemons. This evergreen tree is in the Rue family, Rutaceae, which also includes citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons and kumquats. Limes are native to Southeast Asia, and probably originated in Indonesia or Malaysia. They made their way to the eastern Mediterranean with the Arabs, and to the western Mediterranean, with returning Crusaders, and eventually to the West Indies, more particularly Haiti, when Columbus introduced citrus fruits there on his second voyage. These limes, used in most of the world, are what we call Key Limes.

Key limes were grown commercially in southern Florida and the Florida keys, until the 1926 hurricane wiped out the citrus groves. The growers replaced the Key Lime trees with Persian Lime trees because they are easier to grow, easier to pick because they have no thorns, and due to the much thicker skin, are easier and more economical to ship.

Indy. So as you see, there are a lot or worldly regions that know about the key lime prior to the U.S. But they have alos been in the U.S. for over a hundred years and are now considered a Florida native as the cultivar "Swindle".
Note to mods:

As you can see, this is turning into a "classic" thread. Please don't take a blow torch to it when you get in later this morning! Smile
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