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quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
For those of you with self-winding watches, is there a winder that is recommended, or are they all about the same? I see some that range from under $50 to several hundred for a single watch.


Haggis, they seem like a racket to me as you have to decide do you need one for each watch, a subset, etc.? Of course I have one though. My personal opinion is I view them as disposable electronics. If/when they die, just buy another one.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
What are the thoughts on the Tudor line of watches? I understand they are owned by Rolex, which frankly does nothing for me.

I received one as a gift twenty-seven years ago, and while it looks good, it doesn't tell time real well. My Cartier Tank, same age and another gift, is accurate and still looks great.
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
For those of you with self-winding watches, is there a winder that is recommended, or are they all about the same? I see some that range from under $50 to several hundred for a single watch.


I agree with snipes - I have owned a few more reasonably priced ones, and they invariably break down. I currently have this one from Brookstone. The great thing about this, is that it is modular. One of them breaks, you get rid of that one and replace it with a new one, which I have done once. You can also get as many as you need, from a single to 6 to 8- the way they are built, you just stack them on each other.

I also agree with Bigfoot - the Orbita is quite pricey but one of the best in category. I could afford one for a single watch winder, but I need 4 watches wound, and it gets quite pricey at that point.

Hey snipes and Bigfoot, will be in Atlanta in September - I will try to connect with you guys!
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
What are the thoughts on the Tudor line of watches? I understand they are owned by Rolex, which frankly does nothing for me.
I'm eyeballing the Tudor Ranger. I purchased a similarly styled Hamilton Officer 6-8 months ago and it has been in the shop more than on my wrist. If they can't fix it this go round I'm going to ask for my $$ back and move on to something else. Personally I like the looks of the Hamilton better.


snipes, since Tudor returned to the U.S. market in 2013 they have been eating up market share.

While their quality is nowhere near Rolex, nor is their pricing. They have started using in-house movements on some of their watches but not the Ranger yet. The Ranger still uses the very reliable ETA 2824 movement created originally by Eterna. This is a rock solid engine and easily serviceable by many.

The watch is far superior to the Hamilton of today but obviously cost more. I think you would be well pleased with Tudor as their QA/QC is excellent for their price point IMO.

We can talk more at dinner next week.
Haggis, it might be helpful to understand what you are looking for in a watch to offer better options, if that makes sense.

If one is looking for highly accurate watches and I mean highly, highly jeweled, high frequency quartz cannot be beat with any mechanical watch, period. An example is the Grand Seiko ( grow their own quartz) 9F movement which is within 5 seconds per year. Many have tested out at +/- one second per year. Girard Perregaux caliber 350 quartz is an amazing 32,768 hertz ( vibrations per second) will also perform within one second per year.

High end quartz is also thermo-compensating to eliminate the temperature fluctuations that occur in standard quartz watches just as an example.

None of this matters to 99% of people, but something tells me you like specifics. Big Grin I currently own 19 watches ( planning on reducing) with 17 mechanical. If you prefer mechanical, the wants and desires of your watch selection will be critical.

I will be glad to help and offer opinions if you like, but don't want to bore with details also.
quote:
Originally posted by Wine doc:
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
For those of you with self-winding watches, is there a winder that is recommended, or are they all about the same? I see some that range from under $50 to several hundred for a single watch.


I agree with snipes - I have owned a few more reasonably priced ones, and they invariably break down. I currently have this one from Brookstone. The great thing about this, is that it is modular. One of them breaks, you get rid of that one and replace it with a new one, which I have done once. You can also get as many as you need, from a single to 6 to 8- the way they are built, you just stack them on each other.

I also agree with Bigfoot - the Orbita is quite pricey but one of the best in category. I could afford one for a single watch winder, but I need 4 watches wound, and it gets quite pricey at that point.

Hey snipes and Bigfoot, will be in Atlanta in September - I will try to connect with you guys!


Please do - curious to hear about your Audi adventures and any customizing you've been up to. Mine's undergone a rather thorough conversion!
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Haggis, it might be helpful to understand what you are looking for in a watch to offer better options, if that makes sense.

If one is looking for highly accurate watches and I mean highly, highly jeweled, high frequency quartz cannot be beat with any mechanical watch, period. An example is the Grand Seiko ( grow their own quartz) 9F movement which is within 5 seconds per year. Many have tested out at +/- one second per year. Girard Perregaux caliber 350 quartz is an amazing 32,768 hertz ( vibrations per second) will also perform within one second per year.

High end quartz is also thermo-compensating to eliminate the temperature fluctuations that occur in standard quartz watches just as an example.

None of this matters to 99% of people, but something tells me you like specifics. Big Grin I currently own 19 watches ( planning on reducing) with 17 mechanical. If you prefer mechanical, the wants and desires of your watch selection will be critical.

I will be glad to help and offer opinions if you like, but don't want to bore with details also.


w+a: Being in the sciences, I very much appreciate the details! Bring them on.

As for my criteria, I'm not interested in the level of accuracy that you describe for some watches. I'm interested in something that looks good (appeals to my aesthetics), is reliable, and is affordable. Some of these magnificent time pieces are way beyond my budget. I'm looking at something in the $1000 or range.

The styles I like are IWC Portofino (can't afford) and Junghans (Max Bill, Meister, Form C). So, "Bauhaus", minimalist, whatever.

More later, and looking forward to learning more from all of you. Thanks!
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Haggis, it might be helpful to understand what you are looking for in a watch to offer better options, if that makes sense.

If one is looking for highly accurate watches and I mean highly, highly jeweled, high frequency quartz cannot be beat with any mechanical watch, period. An example is the Grand Seiko ( grow their own quartz) 9F movement which is within 5 seconds per year. Many have tested out at +/- one second per year. Girard Perregaux caliber 350 quartz is an amazing 32,768 hertz ( vibrations per second) will also perform within one second per year.

High end quartz is also thermo-compensating to eliminate the temperature fluctuations that occur in standard quartz watches just as an example.

None of this matters to 99% of people, but something tells me you like specifics. Big Grin I currently own 19 watches ( planning on reducing) with 17 mechanical. If you prefer mechanical, the wants and desires of your watch selection will be critical.

I will be glad to help and offer opinions if you like, but don't want to bore with details also.


w+a: Being in the sciences, I very much appreciate the details! Bring them on.

As for my criteria, I'm not interested in the level of accuracy that you describe for some watches. I'm interested in something that looks good (appeals to my aesthetics), is reliable, and is affordable. Some of these magnificent time pieces are way beyond my budget. I'm looking at something in the $1000 or range.

The styles I like are IWC Portofino (can't afford) and Junghans (Max Bill, Meister, Form C). So, "Bauhaus", minimalist, whatever.

More later, and looking forward to learning more from all of you. Thanks!


Good info... let me think.
Haggis, based on both the cost you are looking for plus the style, Junghans will be near the top of any list for sure IMO. You might explore the following just to confirm your decision.

Christopher Ward
Stowa
Braun
Laco
Meister Singer
Huckleberry & Co.

Autodromo is probably too busy for you, but they have some interesting dials in your price range and even Oris, but they may be too much of a tool watch for you.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Haggis, based on both the cost you are looking for plus the style, Junghans will be near the top of any list for sure IMO. You might explore the following just to confirm your decision.

Christopher Ward
Stowa
Braun
Laco
Meister Singer
Huckleberry & Co.

Autodromo is probably too busy for you, but they have some interesting dials in your price range and even Oris, but they may be too much of a tool watch for you.


Hi w+a: these are great suggestions. Thanks so much! I have checked CW. I like the style a lot, but not completely enthused about their new "branding." But, I look forward to researching them all.
Does anyone know where in the DC area to have fine watches repaired? I have a 65yo steel case Rolex Oyster that was my father's that the self-winding mechanism on no longer works. I would love to get it repaired if possible.

It probably isn't worth much to anyone except me, but I would love to get it repaired so I could wear it once in a while. It was my mother's present to my father for their first anniversary.

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