I always grill my filets but the weather here in Dallas has be being a wuss and am staying in. Any advice on how the best way to cok these inside? I was thinking of using a 50.50 oil and butter to sear the meat then put in the over for a bit. Any help from the pros out there would help.
Original Post
I'd make steak au poivre. Top the room temp filets with freshly cracked black pepper, sear in a hot skillet with oil and butter. Deglaze with cognac or brandy, (watch your eyebrows) add heavy cream and freshly chopped herbs, stir, add the filets and serve.
I do this all the time.

Put them in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes. This should get internal temp 100-115. This is for the monstrous Costco fillet 4 pack sized steak.

During the last 5 minutes or so, get a skillet nice and hot. I only use butter, any time I use oil it tastes funny. Sear to your liking.

I have a grill pan and that adds nice marks, doubtful that it really makes a difference in cooking.
Call me a heathen, but I love filet in stir fry. Cube it (large) stir fry it hot to rare and then finish with a garlic/ginger/black bean sauce. Kick a__.

PH
PH- you're a heathen! and welcome back!

Otis has made one of the best filets I've ever had. He coated it in porcini dust (grind some porcinis in the coffee grinder), then seared them in a pan in butter & EVOO (I think) just to get a crust, then put the pan in the oven until the steaks were medium rare (can't remember how much time). I think there was a red wine reduction sauce too, but it was too long ago for me to remember the details.
quote:
Originally posted by grossie:
PH- you're a heathen! and welcome back!

Otis has made one of the best filets I've ever had. He coated it in porcini dust (grind some porcinis in the coffee grinder), then seared them in a pan in butter & EVOO (I think) just to get a crust, then put the pan in the oven until the steaks were medium rare (can't remember how much time). I think there was a red wine reduction sauce too, but it was too long ago for me to remember the details.


OTIS give it up!! Thanks Grossie!
Thanks guys - I kinda used a hybrid. I did the 50/50 then coated in black pepper and put in over for a nice rare plus. I am not a big sauce on my steak guy - just want the meat to show through. Went very well with a 2006 Continuum for a nice Valentines day for my wife and myself. Even the little one cooperated and sat in her swing while we ate.
Late to the thread, but...

I do sauce on filets, as I think they are the least flavorful cut.

Nice hot, non-stick pan. I'm on about an 8 on my dial. I use clarified butter, cook about 6 mins a side, and let them rest. While resting, deglaze with brandy, toss in some finely chopped shallots and cook for a couple of minutes, then add heavy cream and green peppercorns (the wet ones). Cook down for a few mins until cream is making the big bubbles. Plate steaks and dump and juices back into the skillet. Spoon over steaks and serve.

keytohwy
quote:
Originally posted by keytohwy:
I do sauce on filets, as I think they are the least flavorful cut.
I agree. It’s also the only steak I prefer to cook inside vs. the grill.

My favorite for filets is the classic Diane Sauce:

Season steaks with salt/pepper and sear in a really hot cast iron pan with butter and a natural oil and then finish in the oven. While the steaks are resting, cook shallots, garlic and mushrooms in the same cast iron pan. After a couple of minutes add a splash of brandy and flame. After the flame cooks out add a little dijon mustard and heavy cream and cook about another minute while everything combines. Here is where you can add some demiglace to really lift it up, but it’s still pretty good without it. Pour the sauce lightly over half the steak and finish with some chopped chives or scallions.
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
I do this all the time.

Put them in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes. This should get internal temp 100-115. This is for the monstrous Costco fillet 4 pack sized steak.

During the last 5 minutes or so, get a skillet nice and hot. I only use butter, any time I use oil it tastes funny. Sear to your liking.



Interesting method - I've never heard of anyone searing the steaks at the end of the prep. I always sear first. I guess whatever method works for you is what you should continue to use.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
I do this all the time.

Put them in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes. This should get internal temp 100-115. This is for the monstrous Costco fillet 4 pack sized steak.

During the last 5 minutes or so, get a skillet nice and hot. I only use butter, any time I use oil it tastes funny. Sear to your liking.



Interesting method - I've never heard of anyone searing the steaks at the end of the prep. I always sear first. I guess whatever method works for you is what you should continue to use.


Cooks illustrated advocated this method a couple of years ago. It works really well for thicker and more massive steaks such as a double bone-in rib-eye or three inch thick porterhouse. I have had pretty good success, but I use a lower initial temp for a longer time. This allows the fat to gently melt throughout the beef and then a quick, high temperature sear gets a good crusting and brings the critter up to service temperature. On thing I would advise is to NOT salt the beef in the initial stage. Once "warmed", remove the steak from the oven and dry with paper towels (carefully) and then apply a good amount of coarse salt and press firmly with the back of a spoon.
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
I do this all the time.

Put them in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes. This should get internal temp 100-115. This is for the monstrous Costco fillet 4 pack sized steak.

During the last 5 minutes or so, get a skillet nice and hot. I only use butter, any time I use oil it tastes funny. Sear to your liking.



Interesting method - I've never heard of anyone searing the steaks at the end of the prep. I always sear first. I guess whatever method works for you is what you should continue to use.


Cooks illustrated advocated this method a couple of years ago. It works really well for thicker and more massive steaks such as a double bone-in rib-eye or three inch thick porterhouse. I have had pretty good success, but I use a lower initial temp for a longer time. This allows the fat to gently melt throughout the beef and then a quick, high temperature sear gets a good crusting and brings the critter up to service temperature. On thing I would advise is to NOT salt the beef in the initial stage. Once "warmed", remove the steak from the oven and dry with paper towels (carefully) and then apply a good amount of coarse salt and press firmly with the back of a spoon.


Sounds interesting...is the butter clarified?
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
Whitey, where in Dallas are you?

I know a thing or two about cooking some beef critter and I am always on the lookout for a eating/drinking buddy.


Bill, Whitey and I might hook up this Thursday to share a bottle and trade some wine.

Feel free to join us!
quote:
Originally posted by errestaurants:
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
I do this all the time.

Put them in a 300 degree oven for 15 minutes. This should get internal temp 100-115. This is for the monstrous Costco fillet 4 pack sized steak.

During the last 5 minutes or so, get a skillet nice and hot. I only use butter, any time I use oil it tastes funny. Sear to your liking.



Interesting method - I've never heard of anyone searing the steaks at the end of the prep. I always sear first. I guess whatever method works for you is what you should continue to use.


Cooks illustrated advocated this method a couple of years ago. It works really well for thicker and more massive steaks such as a double bone-in rib-eye or three inch thick porterhouse. I have had pretty good success, but I use a lower initial temp for a longer time. This allows the fat to gently melt throughout the beef and then a quick, high temperature sear gets a good crusting and brings the critter up to service temperature. On thing I would advise is to NOT salt the beef in the initial stage. Once "warmed", remove the steak from the oven and dry with paper towels (carefully) and then apply a good amount of coarse salt and press firmly with the back of a spoon.


Sounds interesting...is the butter clarified?
I got this method from America's Test Kitchen (Cooks Illustrated).

I've always salted/peppered the steaks before putting them in the oven. I've never thought not doing this would improve the cuts, but I may try this out once.

And no, not clarified butter, just cut off the stick and melted in the pan.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Call me a heathen, but I love filet in stir fry. Cube it (large) stir fry it hot to rare and then finish with a garlic/ginger/black bean sauce. Kick a__.

PH
No...a true heathen would order/prepare this butterflied.
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
Whitey, where in Dallas are you?

I know a thing or two about cooking some beef critter and I am always on the lookout for a eating/drinking buddy.


Hey Bill - I am in Lakewood. What about yourself?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Bill, Whitey and I might hook up this Thursday to share a bottle and trade some wine.

Feel free to join us!


Thanks for the invite, but no-can-do this weekend as I already have a couple of guys coming over for some Flannery Beef on The Weber and some decent Cali wines.
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
Irving, but have knives & will travel.


Sounds good. I am a bit of an amateur compared to you and Michael - I just like good beef and good wines - but know I do not have the experience of you guys. Still would love to get together soon - if you can deal with me.
quote:
Originally posted by keytohwy:
Late to the thread, but...

I do sauce on filets, as I think they are the least flavorful cut.

Nice hot, non-stick pan. I'm on about an 8 on my dial. I use clarified butter, cook about 6 mins a side, and let them rest. While resting, deglaze with brandy, toss in some finely chopped shallots and cook for a couple of minutes, then add heavy cream and green peppercorns (the wet ones). Cook down for a few mins until cream is making the big bubbles. Plate steaks and dump and juices back into the skillet. Spoon over steaks and serve.

keytohwy


I almost always grill steaks but I liked the simplicity of this method, so I tried it last night. Very easy and very good. Now I'll start experimenting with other ingredients in the sauce.
quote:
Originally posted by Whitey:
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
Irving, but have knives & will travel.


Sounds good. I am a bit of an amateur compared to you and Michael - I just like good beef and good wines - but know I do not have the experience of you guys. Still would love to get together soon - if you can deal with me.


If you guys ever need help eating beef and drinking wine I'm your man. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
quote:
Originally posted by Whitey:
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
Irving, but have knives & will travel.


Sounds good. I am a bit of an amateur compared to you and Michael - I just like good beef and good wines - but know I do not have the experience of you guys. Still would love to get together soon - if you can deal with me.


If you guys ever need help eating beef and drinking wine I'm your man. Cool


if you guys ever make it to fort Worth I'd love to get together. Sapristi and Nonna Tata are good byo choices.
Whitey, filet mignon is prized as much (or more) for its texture and purity as for its flavor. I never grill it. It is the perfect (I mean "absolutely perfect") substrate for pan-searing and deglazing. I've posted one of my best recipes, steak aux poivres, in several threads here. That's the way I'd go.

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