I will be grilling a tri-tip tonight. Green salad to go with. No wine tonight.
Original Post
Made hanger steak taco’s last night. Marinated the meat in fresh lime and orange juice with cumin, onions, garlic and jalapeno’s and beer. Cut into small cubes after searing in a cast iron skillet and served with fresh corn tortillas, diced onion and cilantro. Negra Modelo to drink.
Wow, everyone's having great stuff. I think my wife is cooking up a vegetarian creation of some sort. Yum!

KSC: I went to an Indian restaurant in Montreal many years ago, where upon ordering naan bread, the owner corrected us by saying "it is called naan. Not naan bread. Naan means bread. When you say naan bread you are saying bread bread. That is silly." So naan it is, but I don't think we ever went back to that place!
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Wow, everyone's having great stuff. I think my wife is cooking up a vegetarian creation of some sort. Yum!

KSC: I went to an Indian restaurant in Montreal many years ago, where upon ordering naan bread, the owner corrected us by saying "it is called naan. Not naan bread. Naan means bread. When you say naan bread you are saying bread bread. That is silly."


mPk: I just had to check this, so I went to Google translate, typed in "bread" for an English to Hindi translation.

Result: रोटी

Do I pronounce this "Naan"? Dunno, so I'll take your word for it.

Actually, I make my own Chicken Tikka Masala from scratch and prefer it to most I get from any restaurant. However, I long ago gave up attempting to make my own Naan Smile, so I order from a local Indian restaurant (same with the Sag).
We started with a bottle of Roederer Anderson's Valley bubbles, had that with some 2-year cave-aged gouda, then moved on to honey-garlic brie with a nice fresh baguette.

Then it was time for the slow-cooked duck, cooked in duck fat and olive oil. It was great. I was really happy with it, especially considering it was my first time cooking duck. The meat was extremely tender, succulent, and tasty.

Used the juices from the slow cooker to roast some potatoes, and made a little arugula salad. All in all, it was a nice little meal.

Had a 2005 Talley Pinot Noir with the duck. Good juice, especially for the $23 we picked it up for.
It was kind of rainy and cold, so we had soup (a store bought Tuscan white bean and chicken that was actually pretty good) and grilled cheese sandwiches. No wine.
I'm making pan fried Sweetbreads tomorrow. I'm really looking forward to that.

Any accompaniments I shouldn't pass up?
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
mPk: I just had to check this, so I went to Google translate, typed in "bread" for an English to Hindi translation.

Result: रोटी

Do I pronounce this "Naan"? Dunno, so I'll take your word for it.


KSC: I spoke to my colleague who speaks Hindi. Turns out naan is a Punjabi term but throughout India, regardless of dialect, naan refers specifically to flatbread cooked in an oven (to differentiate from chapati). So, it is indeed unnecessary to say the word bread after naan. Still, I think our restaurant guy was in a funny mood or something, and as I mentioned, we never went back there again.
Wed. we had our fish guy filet a lemon sole for us and we cooked it simply in olive oil and lemon and served with roasted garlic, potato and parsnip mash and steamed asparagus.

Last night I made ginger and scallion noodles.

Tonight I’m trying out a new recipe – pork shoulder braised in milk….
Tonight – grilled New York strip with porcini mushroom risotto and zuchinni. I’ve a ’00 Hendry ready to open.

Tomorrow night – lamb chops, leftover risotto. The jury is still out on which Bordeaux to pull.
quote:
Originally posted by Gentleman farmer:
Tonight – grilled New York strip


Gf....I hope you've moved your grill a little closer to the farmhouse. Eek Wink

I'm finishing off some baby backs on the grill. Mine is 11 paces from the back door. Good thing. It's starting to come down pretty seriously now.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:

Gf....I hope you've moved your grill a little closer to the farmhouse. Eek Wink


PH

Grillin' a la Vulcan tonight my good man. I figure I'll be out in the fluff enough over the next couple of days trying to keep the lane open to the road. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by redknife:
Quiet Friday night at home:

Melted brie with white onions and a touch of white truffle oil on a bun.


What wine did you match with this Redknife?

I hope to you see you agin soon!
I love green peppercorn sauce with steak, but I've have Szechuan peppers that precluded tatsing anything but heat.
quote:
Originally posted by justme:
Tonight will be all you can eat crab at the Community Center fundraiser. They're gonna lose some money on me!


I was happily suprised at the quality of the crab, very sweet. I was even more suprised when they came around with big Ziplock bags for us to take some home. I saw some people taking home 3 or 4 bags! This morning I had crab Benedict and tonight I will finish off the rest.
Good thing my husband doesn't care for crab.
quote:
Originally posted by Mezzo Litro:
I know, B-O. I love lots of peppercorn on my steak, but it doesn't make the steak spicey...just peppery (big difference in my mind). Szechuan bring heat and spice, something I also like, but not on your traditional steak. I'm not sure a typical cali cab or bordeaux wine will go with this recipe, so I'm not overly concerned about the wine pairing. But I do want to try it. I'll let you know how it turns out if I try it this week.

BTW. The steak is pan seared in a cast iron pan (on the cooktop) and then baked in the oven. I usually cook my steak rare to medium rare. I think this receipe will require medium rare to medium. If it sucks, I'll slice up the steak and add it to a stirfry the next day.


I'm going to agree with Board-O in the fact that adding a ton of cracked black peppercorns and Szechuan peppercorns completely overwhelms a good steak. His recipe for green peppercorn crusted filet mignon (only crusted on one side), with the green peppercorns being reconstituted in cognac and the cream, Dijon mustard, and Amontillado sauce is excellent and I can't recommend it enough. It's a very wine friendly dish.
Last night we marinated chicken thighs in lime and orange juice, cumin, cayenne, paprika, onions and garlic and then seared in a cast iron pan. Served with fresh corn tortillas, guacamole and salsa. Good stuff.
ingredients:

Thick, top-quality filet mignons. I use 8 ounce filet
mignons. This also works well with ribeyes or NY Strips. If you're not serving a number of other courses, you might opt
for larger ones.

Green peppercorns. If you get them dried, soak them in
Cognac for a day or longer to reconstitute them.

Peanut oil

Butter 2 tablespoons

Cognac (brandy can be used)

Dry and sweet Sherry (A little Amontillado sweetness adds a
nice touch to this sauce.)

Shallots 2 cloves, chopped (garlic can be used instead, 4
cloves, minced)

Heavy cream

Dijon mustard, 2 teaspoons

Cooking instructions:

Press plenty of green peppercorns into both sides of each
filet mignon, but don't flatten the filets.

Preheat oven to 140 degrees.

Add a very small amount of peanut oil to a heavy cast iron
skillet, preferably one with a top to minimize splatter. I use a cast
iron
chicken cooker that came with a glass top. You want just enough oil so
that when you heat it, it will just spread out and cover the pan. You
aren't frying the meat; you're pan broiling it. Heat the skillet on high
heat til the oil begins to smoke. Using tongs, add the filets to the pan
and sear on each side for about three minutes.
Remove the filets to a platter, cover with aluminum foil, and place in
the oven.

Add 2 tablespoons butter to the pan. It will melt quickly.
Stir and scrape the particles off the bottom of the pan. Add the
shallots and cook briefly til they become translucent. Keep stirring and

scraping.
Then add about 3-4 tablespoons of Cognac and either flame
to burn off the alcohol, or just cook for a minute and the alcohol will
evaporate. Add about 4-5 tablespoons of dry Sherry and continue scraping and
stirring. After it reduces a little, add about
3-4 ounces of heavy cream and 3 tablespoons of sweet Sherry, stirring and scraping all the while.

As it begins to thicken, pour in the juices that have
accumulated on the meat platter
from the oven. When the sauce begins to thicken, remove it from the
burner or it will separate. Add 2 teaspons of Dijon mustard and stir
well. Pour the sauce over the filets and serve.

Wild rice or garlic mashed potatoes goes well with that
sauce.

You can vary the amounts of the ingredients to taste. It
can be made with black peppercorns, but that can be kind of spicy and
it could overwhelm a good red wine. I also use this recipe for breast of
duck. If you do, cut through the skin and fat, but not into the meat,
and place rows of green peppercorns in the slits. You will also need to
pour off the fat after pan searing the breasts.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×