Skip to main content

quote:
Originally posted by Pogg:
quote:
Originally posted by inky:
Prime rib and tenderloin are not cuts of steak, the cuts would be the filet and ribeye/bone-in rib steak/delmonico/etc.

As far as your favorite, you start by saying flank or sirloin, than you say if you had to eat one steak ond only one, it would be the strip ??????


True, Prime Rib is not a cut of steak. It is a seasoned & slowly roasted Rib Eye. If you want to get technical the tenderloin is a primal cut of beef, as is also a Ribeye. Depending where you cut down on the Ribeye, what is attached, or how it is presented changes the name of a ribeye.

Sirloin & Flank are my favorite cuts of beef however they do have some qualities that over time I would get tired of. I chose the strip as the only steak I would eat for the rest of my life because of the best of both world qualities. They can be quite tender and the strip loin is worked enough to give it some flavor. If you were told you could drink only one bottle of wine for the rest of your life (endless supply in the bottle), would you choose your favorite or something that could be enjoyed with a wide variety of occasions???

Just out of curiousity, what do you consider a Delmonico?

A prime rib would not be considered a roasted ribeye (which is considered a cut/steak), but instead a roast of a cut of beef from the rib section, also known as a rib roast or standing rib roast. Steaks that are cut from the uncooked rib roast are known as rib eyes.

A delmonico was derived originally as a form of preparation from the famous steak house, Delmonicos. Although there is contreversy as to what the cut was originally, it has become most known as a boneless ribeye. Next...
Now I've always thought that a Delmonico was a bone-in NY strip. Just checked the websites of 2 Seattle area steakhouses (Daniel's Broiler & Metro Grill) and confirmed.
Although I see from the original Delmonico's website:
“The Classic” Delmonico Steak
Twenty Ounce Wet Aged Prime Boneless Ribeye

Wonder how that changed from the east coast to the west?
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Now I've always thought that a Delmonico was a bone-in NY strip. Just checked the websites of 2 Seattle area steakhouses (Daniel's Broiler & Metro Grill) and confirmed.
Although I see from the original Delmonico's website:
“The Classic” Delmonico Steak
Twenty Ounce Wet Aged Prime Boneless Ribeye

Wonder how that changed from the east coast to the west?


I'm just as confused, I thought I knew my cuts of a cow, but apparently I don't anymore =(
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
Prime Rib has many definitions to the outside world. Most of them not good ones.

I've been to more than enough weddings where the term "Prime Rib" was barely applicable. Roll Eyes


That's the term I had in my mind too.

Where it feels like they boiled it in water to save time in creating the "au ju" sauce
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
Prime Rib has many definitions to the outside world. Most of them not good ones.

I've been to more than enough weddings where the term "Prime Rib" was barely applicable. Roll Eyes


That's the term I had in my mind too.

Where it feels like they boiled it in water to save time in creating the "au ju" sauce

You can throw that in with the cruise ship's version of the "prime rib" Frown
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
This thread got me in the mood for steak. Went to the store, filet was on sale. Don't understand why people say it has nice texture and no flavor? Cook it right and it tastes great.


How bout this...it has the least amount of flavor compared to Strip, Rib Steaks and heck, ever Sirloin.

It's the leanest cut, less fat = less flavor
Krogers in our area has porterhouse for $7.29 per pound. I may get the buter to do a cut to make a strip and filet.
quote:
Originally posted by kybo:
1) NY Strip
2) Filet
3) Porterhouse (natch!)

One of the local Kroger stores here does a pretty fair job w/their hand-cut steaks. Late last summer, they had a sale on T-bones for $9.99/lb. I asked for three porterhouse cuts (1-1/2" to 2"), he smiled and came back out with three steaks about 2-1/2"+ in thickness (I think mostly because he saw the ravenous look in the eyes of my 14 yr. old!). With the additional $2.00/lb. off w/the Kroger card, I picked up 96 oz. of beautiful porterhouse steaks for about $50. Took them home and realized there was no way Mrs. K and I could eat a 31-32 oz. steak, so I cut out the filets (10-12 oz.) and sawed off the short chine bone on to leave a couple of 20-22oz. bone-in strips.

The BI strips were incredible, and I believe the G-man ate his entire porterhouse, and a portion of Mrs. K's strip. For outdoor grilling, the thicker the better.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×