What is your favorite cut of steak? I like a marbeled ribeye.
Original Post
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO. Smile

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.
Some steaks have almost no marbeling which would result in a dry cooked steak.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
... as opposed to a non-marbled rib eye. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO. Smile

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.


So in general.... Razz
Bone-in ribeye. I love the fat, and the meat has the most flavor, and a good piece will be tender as well. A perfect vehicle for some delicious Bearnaise sauce.
For grilling, ribeye and NY Strip.

For pan searing with a deglazing sauce, filet mignon

For stir frying, skirt steak

For marinating and grilling, skirt steak
On my backyard grill - Costco Rib-eye

In a restaurant - specifically Peter Lugar's, porterhouse. Probably the best restaurant steak I have ever tasted.
USDA prime or wagyu aged ribeye, about 1.5 inches thick, with extreme quality marbling (there is good marbling and bad marbling which would just be considered fatty, not good and not the same). Method of cooking: bring to room temperature, apply fresh ground black pepper and a good artisinal sea salt, then pan seared in cast iron skillet until a nice crust, but not char, forms, cooked medium rare. Why, follow the previous two sentences and taste...
Used to be New York Strip-loin, but it was hit or miss - sometimes rather tough. I then switched to rib-eye and haven't looked back. A prime rib steak is quite nice, as well, but I don't see it very often.
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO.

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.


So in general....


Right! Big Grin

No. I can never answer a straight [general] question. Razz
For me it has to be the bone in "Cowboy Ribeye". While I know that it is the "worst" cut of meat for you, my wife, family and household are vegetarian, and so I only get out to a good piece of meat 2-3 times a year and I figure i need to make it count. As to preparation, it has to be just really good salt and freshly ground pepper. Simplicity is perfection, if the cut and cook is correct. perfect char, marbling and seasoning gets me through 3-4 months of tofurkey
Filet or Prime Rib. Starting to like ribeye a little more, just not too big of a fan of fat. Always put bourbon oak chips with my steaks.
I have two favorites --
Porterhouse, because you get two different steak experinces in one cut; and
Bone in Rib eye -- because hands down (to me) it's the most flavorful piece of meat on a cow.
Yum... Now I want steak for dinner.

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