What is your favorite cut of steak? I like a marbeled ribeye.
Original Post
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO. Smile

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.
Some steaks have almost no marbeling which would result in a dry cooked steak.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
... as opposed to a non-marbled rib eye. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO. Smile

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.


So in general.... Razz
Bone-in ribeye. I love the fat, and the meat has the most flavor, and a good piece will be tender as well. A perfect vehicle for some delicious Bearnaise sauce.
For grilling, ribeye and NY Strip.

For pan searing with a deglazing sauce, filet mignon

For stir frying, skirt steak

For marinating and grilling, skirt steak
On my backyard grill - Costco Rib-eye

In a restaurant - specifically Peter Lugar's, porterhouse. Probably the best restaurant steak I have ever tasted.
USDA prime or wagyu aged ribeye, about 1.5 inches thick, with extreme quality marbling (there is good marbling and bad marbling which would just be considered fatty, not good and not the same). Method of cooking: bring to room temperature, apply fresh ground black pepper and a good artisinal sea salt, then pan seared in cast iron skillet until a nice crust, but not char, forms, cooked medium rare. Why, follow the previous two sentences and taste...
Used to be New York Strip-loin, but it was hit or miss - sometimes rather tough. I then switched to rib-eye and haven't looked back. A prime rib steak is quite nice, as well, but I don't see it very often.
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
No one answer as my favorite as it's not always just about the cut, but the quality of the meat, where I am and what I have in front of me. A thin t-bone of nothing wrapped in a supermarket may not be all you want it to be.

I will say if i'm in a prime steak meat store or steakhouse situation with serious dry aged good stuff to pick - give me a Porterhouse medium rare to get my filet and t-bone fix. But, if the special of the house is a rib steak on a long bone and they swear by it - I'm going for it.

Meat quality is huge - more than the cut IMO.

The above applies to seafood even more and why I have no favorite fish. I love all fresh-high quality seafood and hate anything not fresh or weak quality.


So in general....


Right! Big Grin

No. I can never answer a straight [general] question. Razz
For me it has to be the bone in "Cowboy Ribeye". While I know that it is the "worst" cut of meat for you, my wife, family and household are vegetarian, and so I only get out to a good piece of meat 2-3 times a year and I figure i need to make it count. As to preparation, it has to be just really good salt and freshly ground pepper. Simplicity is perfection, if the cut and cook is correct. perfect char, marbling and seasoning gets me through 3-4 months of tofurkey
Filet or Prime Rib. Starting to like ribeye a little more, just not too big of a fan of fat. Always put bourbon oak chips with my steaks.
I have two favorites --
Porterhouse, because you get two different steak experinces in one cut; and
Bone in Rib eye -- because hands down (to me) it's the most flavorful piece of meat on a cow.
Yum... Now I want steak for dinner.
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
For me it has to be the bone in "Cowboy Ribeye"...

when i was in Santa Barbara about a month ago i went to a steakhouse called Holdren's and had the cowboy cut Ribeye, it came on a bed of fried jalapenos & onion strips Eek
quote:
Originally posted by Lorrie:
Some steaks have almost no marbeling which would result in a dry cooked steak.


and all this time I thought lean and no marbeling resulted in a juicy uber flavorful steak. What was I thinking?
quote:
Originally posted by kumazam:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
For me it has to be the bone in "Cowboy Ribeye"...

when i was in Santa Barbara about a month ago i went to a steakhouse called Holdren's and had the cowboy cut Ribeye, it came on a bed of fried jalapenos & onion strips Eek


That's Santa Barbara for ya!
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by kumazam:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
For me it has to be the bone in "Cowboy Ribeye"...

when i was in Santa Barbara about a month ago i went to a steakhouse called Holdren's and had the cowboy cut Ribeye, it came on a bed of fried jalapenos & onion strips Eek



okay, let me clarify - I have seen it called the Cowboy Ribeye, but I am speaking of the bone in ribeye. while I like both jalepenos and onions, I will pass with the steak. As I said, this is a rare occasion for me and I want a nice, thick steak, rare/rare+ with salt and pepper. Fixins are for others.

I just did my first one of the year last week and passed on all the soups/apps/sides and just focused on the wine and the steak. It was perfect. Followed it all up with a nice glass of Basil Hayden, and then slept like a baby.

That's Santa Barbara for ya!
I like it all, just depends on the mood. On the grill I like ribeye and ny strip, filet mignon for pan roasting, flank steak grilled and sliced thin topped with chimichurri sauce and skirt steak for fajitas. I’m hungry now.
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
okay, let me clarify - I have seen it called the Cowboy Ribeye, but I am speaking of the bone in ribeye. while I like both jalepenos and onions, I will pass with the steak. As I said, this is a rare occasion for me and I want a nice, thick steak, rare/rare+ with salt and pepper. Fixins are for others.

I just did my first one of the year last week and passed on all the soups/apps/sides and just focused on the wine and the steak. It was perfect. Followed it all up with a nice glass of Basil Hayden, and then slept like a baby.

it was a bone-in Ribeye, seasoned only with salt & pepper... just happened to come on a bed of fried jalapenos and fried onion strips... i didnt eat them together except for one bite where i had to try it. i took a slice of jalapeno and a slice of onion strip and had it with a piece of steak... whoa Wink
Ribeye.

I got hooked on ribeyes when I lived in Texas. There was a steakhouse near where I lived, called the Oxbow Steakhouse. They only served ribeyes, which were well seasoned with salt and pepper. You ordered by the thickness: "I'd like an inch and a half ribeye"

Fantastic.
I was in Scottsdale recently, and my friends and I hit up AJ's for some steaks to throw on the grill. My 22oz. porterhouse was dwarfed by their 40oz. cowboy ribeye steaks with the bone protruding about 4" from the steak like a giant meat lollipop. (Get your minds out of the gutter.)
Paired with a '97 l'Ecole Apogee. At least I was able to consume all of mine. Big Grin
1) NY Strip
2) Filet
3) Porterhouse (natch!)

One of the local Kroger stores here does a pretty fair job w/their hand-cut steaks. Late last summer, they had a sale on T-bones for $9.99/lb. I asked for three porterhouse cuts (1-1/2" to 2"), he smiled and came back out with three steaks about 2-1/2"+ in thickness (I think mostly because he saw the ravenous look in the eyes of my 14 yr. old!). With the additional $2.00/lb. off w/the Kroger card, I picked up 96 oz. of beautiful porterhouse steaks for about $50. Took them home and realized there was no way Mrs. K and I could eat a 31-32 oz. steak, so I cut out the filets (10-12 oz.) and sawed off the short chine bone on to leave a couple of 20-22oz. bone-in strips.

The BI strips were incredible, and I believe the G-man ate his entire porterhouse, and a portion of Mrs. K's strip. For outdoor grilling, the thicker the better.
We have Kroger's in Little Rock. So I will look for the sales, and use my Kroger's card. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by kybo:
1) NY Strip
2) Filet
3) Porterhouse (natch!)

One of the local Kroger stores here does a pretty fair job w/their hand-cut steaks. Late last summer, they had a sale on T-bones for $9.99/lb. I asked for three porterhouse cuts (1-1/2" to 2"), he smiled and came back out with three steaks about 2-1/2"+ in thickness (I think mostly because he saw the ravenous look in the eyes of my 14 yr. old!). With the additional $2.00/lb. off w/the Kroger card, I picked up 96 oz. of beautiful porterhouse steaks for about $50. Took them home and realized there was no way Mrs. K and I could eat a 31-32 oz. steak, so I cut out the filets (10-12 oz.) and sawed off the short chine bone on to leave a couple of 20-22oz. bone-in strips.

The BI strips were incredible, and I believe the G-man ate his entire porterhouse, and a portion of Mrs. K's strip. For outdoor grilling, the thicker the better.
Nothing beats a good bone-in Ribeye!!! Problem is, if its not prime and well marbled, it can be quite fatty. If I can find it done right or find prime at a market (tough in Tampa..and certainly not aged), then I consider nothing else.

My next choice is Strip or Porterhouse (since Filet is my 3rd choice...since at this point tenderness takes over flavor)
I'm with Hunter in that quality trumps cut. Almost anything graded usda prime is great for me. One thing to be aware of, they just adjusted the standard for prime grade and it's too easy to pass now in my opinion - prime isnt the sure bet it used to be.

Now, if you equalize for quality, I go for bone-in rib steak. My butcher always has prime grade and my favorite is to have them take a big standing rib roast and cut steaks off of that, inch-and-a-half to two inches thick.

Filet is tender but I don't think of it as steak. When it's plated with a nice sauce it's great but I put it in another category.
Toss up between flank steak or sirloin. Tend to like steak for the flavor not the tenderness (for as long as I have my own teeth.) If I had to eat one steak and one only for the rest of my life it would be the NY Strip. I've always thought Tenderloin and Prime Rib are overrated. Tenderloin in one of the least used muscle in the cow therefore being tender but having the least flavor. Prime Rib is a waste of a good ribeye.
quote:
Originally posted by Pogg:
Toss up between flank steak or sirloin. Tend to like steak for the flavor not the tenderness (for as long as I have my own teeth.) If I had to eat one steak and one only for the rest of my life it would be the NY Strip. I've always thought Tenderloin and Prime Rib are overrated. Tenderloin in one of the least used muscle in the cow therefore being tender but having the least flavor. Prime Rib is a waste of a good ribeye.

Prime rib and tenderloin are not cuts of steak, the cuts would be the filet and ribeye/bone-in rib steak/delmonico/etc.

As far as your favorite, you start by saying flank or sirloin, than you say if you had to eat one steak ond only one, it would be the strip ??????
quote:
Originally posted by inky:
Prime rib and tenderloin are not cuts of steak, the cuts would be the filet and ribeye/bone-in rib steak/delmonico/etc.

As far as your favorite, you start by saying flank or sirloin, than you say if you had to eat one steak ond only one, it would be the strip ??????


True, Prime Rib is not a cut of steak. It is a seasoned & slowly roasted Rib Eye. If you want to get technical the tenderloin is a primal cut of beef, as is also a Ribeye. Depending where you cut down on the Ribeye, what is attached, or how it is presented changes the name of a ribeye.

Sirloin & Flank are my favorite cuts of beef however they do have some qualities that over time I would get tired of. I chose the strip as the only steak I would eat for the rest of my life because of the best of both world qualities. They can be quite tender and the strip loin is worked enough to give it some flavor. If you were told you could drink only one bottle of wine for the rest of your life (endless supply in the bottle), would you choose your favorite or something that could be enjoyed with a wide variety of occasions???

Just out of curiousity, what do you consider a Delmonico?
quote:
Originally posted by Pogg:
True, Prime Rib is not a cut of steak. It is a seasoned & slowly roasted Rib Eye. If you want to get technical it need not be seasoned or slow roasted to be called Prime Rib.
I did not know the ribeye and teh tenderloin were teh same area.

I though the rib eye was any meat attached to the ribs the outer portion of the ribs... (which you can see if the bone is attached) It's not as tender as the tenderloin but also very tender and fatty since the cow doesn't utilize it as much.

the tenderloin being the two baseball bats that hang from the inside of the ribs to which filet mignon is curved from.

as with prime rib, I have no idea where this is =)
quote:
Originally posted by Pogg:
quote:
Originally posted by inky:
Prime rib and tenderloin are not cuts of steak, the cuts would be the filet and ribeye/bone-in rib steak/delmonico/etc.

As far as your favorite, you start by saying flank or sirloin, than you say if you had to eat one steak ond only one, it would be the strip ??????


True, Prime Rib is not a cut of steak. It is a seasoned & slowly roasted Rib Eye. If you want to get technical the tenderloin is a primal cut of beef, as is also a Ribeye. Depending where you cut down on the Ribeye, what is attached, or how it is presented changes the name of a ribeye.

Sirloin & Flank are my favorite cuts of beef however they do have some qualities that over time I would get tired of. I chose the strip as the only steak I would eat for the rest of my life because of the best of both world qualities. They can be quite tender and the strip loin is worked enough to give it some flavor. If you were told you could drink only one bottle of wine for the rest of your life (endless supply in the bottle), would you choose your favorite or something that could be enjoyed with a wide variety of occasions???

Just out of curiousity, what do you consider a Delmonico?

A prime rib would not be considered a roasted ribeye (which is considered a cut/steak), but instead a roast of a cut of beef from the rib section, also known as a rib roast or standing rib roast. Steaks that are cut from the uncooked rib roast are known as rib eyes.

A delmonico was derived originally as a form of preparation from the famous steak house, Delmonicos. Although there is contreversy as to what the cut was originally, it has become most known as a boneless ribeye. Next...
Now I've always thought that a Delmonico was a bone-in NY strip. Just checked the websites of 2 Seattle area steakhouses (Daniel's Broiler & Metro Grill) and confirmed.
Although I see from the original Delmonico's website:
“The Classic” Delmonico Steak
Twenty Ounce Wet Aged Prime Boneless Ribeye

Wonder how that changed from the east coast to the west?
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Now I've always thought that a Delmonico was a bone-in NY strip. Just checked the websites of 2 Seattle area steakhouses (Daniel's Broiler & Metro Grill) and confirmed.
Although I see from the original Delmonico's website:
“The Classic” Delmonico Steak
Twenty Ounce Wet Aged Prime Boneless Ribeye

Wonder how that changed from the east coast to the west?


I'm just as confused, I thought I knew my cuts of a cow, but apparently I don't anymore =(
Prime Rib has many definitions to the outside world. Most of them not good ones.

I've been to more than enough weddings where the term "Prime Rib" was barely applicable. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
Prime Rib has many definitions to the outside world. Most of them not good ones.

I've been to more than enough weddings where the term "Prime Rib" was barely applicable. Roll Eyes


That's the term I had in my mind too.

Where it feels like they boiled it in water to save time in creating the "au ju" sauce
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
Prime Rib has many definitions to the outside world. Most of them not good ones.

I've been to more than enough weddings where the term "Prime Rib" was barely applicable. Roll Eyes


That's the term I had in my mind too.

Where it feels like they boiled it in water to save time in creating the "au ju" sauce

You can throw that in with the cruise ship's version of the "prime rib" Frown
Keeping quality constant? Ribeye. Because I think they taste the best.

Nothing can beat a great, dry-aged, USDA Prime ribeye.

Except, maybe, a dry-aged USDA Prime rolled ribeye crown. Razz
This thread got me in the mood for steak. Went to the store, filet was on sale. Don't understand why people say it has nice texture and no flavor? Cook it right and it tastes great.
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
This thread got me in the mood for steak. Went to the store, filet was on sale. Don't understand why people say it has nice texture and no flavor? Cook it right and it tastes great.


How bout this...it has the least amount of flavor compared to Strip, Rib Steaks and heck, ever Sirloin.

It's the leanest cut, less fat = less flavor
Krogers in our area has porterhouse for $7.29 per pound. I may get the buter to do a cut to make a strip and filet.
quote:
Originally posted by kybo:
1) NY Strip
2) Filet
3) Porterhouse (natch!)

One of the local Kroger stores here does a pretty fair job w/their hand-cut steaks. Late last summer, they had a sale on T-bones for $9.99/lb. I asked for three porterhouse cuts (1-1/2" to 2"), he smiled and came back out with three steaks about 2-1/2"+ in thickness (I think mostly because he saw the ravenous look in the eyes of my 14 yr. old!). With the additional $2.00/lb. off w/the Kroger card, I picked up 96 oz. of beautiful porterhouse steaks for about $50. Took them home and realized there was no way Mrs. K and I could eat a 31-32 oz. steak, so I cut out the filets (10-12 oz.) and sawed off the short chine bone on to leave a couple of 20-22oz. bone-in strips.

The BI strips were incredible, and I believe the G-man ate his entire porterhouse, and a portion of Mrs. K's strip. For outdoor grilling, the thicker the better.

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