I live in a townhouse in Chicago and already have one large unit in the living space and don't really want another unit there. I have several options that all raise questions, I think these might have general interest as well.

1 - if I put a eurocave in the garage I think it will be fine in the summer but I'm concerned it would get to cold in the winter, I assume they only have cooling ability, is that a correct assumption ?

2 - I could put the eurocave in my basement with some effort but might have the same issue to a lessor degree. As a separate question, how could you build a very basic cellar for low budget ? It might sound silly but could take a pre made structure like a sauna or garden shed and fit a heating / cooling unit ?

3 - would it better just to use offsite storage ? Do you feel comfortable with these ?

Sorry if this is a lot but I originally thought 170 unit would be fine, now it's already full of wines that need at least 2years so I'm thinking I need 500-800 bottle storage and just use my current unit to have wines on hand that are ready to drink
Original Post
Have you monitored the temperature in the basement? I doubt that it gets anywhere near freezing, and above that the wine is fine.
Depending on the type of door and insulation, it might not even get too cold in the garage.
quote:
Originally posted by welshstar:
I live in a townhouse in Chicago and already have one large unit in the living space and don't really want another unit there. I have several options that all raise questions, I think these might have general interest as well.

1 - if I put a eurocave in the garage I think it will be fine in the summer but I'm concerned it would get to cold in the winter, I assume they only have cooling ability, is that a correct assumption ?

2 - I could put the eurocave in my basement with some effort but might have the same issue to a lessor degree. As a separate question, how could you build a very basic cellar for low budget ? It might sound silly but could take a pre made structure like a sauna or garden shed and fit a heating / cooling unit ?

3 - would it better just to use offsite storage ? Do you feel comfortable with these ?

Sorry if this is a lot but I originally thought 170 unit would be fine, now it's already full of wines that need at least 2years so I'm thinking I need 500-800 bottle storage and just use my current unit to have wines on hand that are ready to drink


In regards to your eurocave in getting too cold, I believe the performance series has a heating option that is ideal for garage use. If you put it in your basement, you shouldn't have an issue with it getting to0 hot or too cold.

If you have room in your basement, building a cellar is a pretty simple and not terribly expensive at all if you do it yourself. Frame out the walls with 2x6's, wrap it with a moisture barrier, insulate it, throw up some moisture resistant drywall, and have an electrician wire your cooling unit. You could build a cellar capable of holding many more bottles than your eurocave for much less price per bottle.

I could go into greater detail if you'd like, (exact costs etc etc) feel free to leave your e-mail.
Hi

That would be great, I'm not a hands on guy so would have someone build the frame but I know a lot of people who would do it for reasonable cost, the temp unit could just plug not wall outlet unless it needs more amperage

If you could email at alaneden72(at) aol com that would be appreciated

Alan
quote:
Originally posted by welshstar:
Hi

That would be great, I'm not a hands on guy so would have someone build the frame but I know a lot of people who would do it for reasonable cost, the temp unit could just plug not wall outlet unless it needs more amperage

If you could email at alaneden72(at) aol com that would be appreciated

Alan


e-mail sent.
quote:
Originally posted by welshstar:
I live in a townhouse in Chicago and already have one large unit in the living space and don't really want another unit there. I have several options that all raise questions, I think these might have general interest as well.

1 - if I put a eurocave in the garage I think it will be fine in the summer but I'm concerned it would get to cold in the winter, I assume they only have cooling ability, is that a correct assumption ?

2 - I could put the eurocave in my basement with some effort but might have the same issue to a lessor degree. As a separate question, how could you build a very basic cellar for low budget ? It might sound silly but could take a pre made structure like a sauna or garden shed and fit a heating / cooling unit ?

3 - would it better just to use offsite storage ? Do you feel comfortable with these ?

Sorry if this is a lot but I originally thought 170 unit would be fine, now it's already full of wines that need at least 2years so I'm thinking I need 500-800 bottle storage and just use my current unit to have wines on hand that are ready to drink


Just my 2 cents... Firstly, Eurocave is a wonderfully constructed unit. Some would argue the best in the home OR commercial realm. There units come in a variety of sizes. I am specifically addressing your question of temperature differential during the summer/winter months. The Eurocave, as with most higher ended units have the equivelant of a "thermal pump" so when the ambient temperature OUTSIDE the unit changes, the pump has the ability to cool OR heat the internal air to stay within (usually) .5-1.0 degrees of your preset temp.

The heating function also utilizes the condensation from the refrigeration of the unit to create your preset or desired humidity.

The one concern you need to bear in mind if placing a unit in your garage is longevity of the compressor / pump. If there are dramatic temperature shifts, or constant need for the unit to adjust internal temps with the method explained above, then your unit may wear itself prematurely.

Again, just my 2 cents. Fwiw, I have a line on a Transtherm Castel here in California. New in the box and not the standard $3895.00 that it sells for online, but could put you in touch with the seller who is asking 2300.00 FYI, its gorgeous, all stainless steel. But I believe the capacity is around 200 which somewhat defeats the purpose. Ahhh maybe just one more glass Roll Eyes

In other words... Exactly what EB said above... Doh!
Last edited by vinolocity
One thing to consider is that the most expensive part of building your own cellar is typically the racking. I'm planning out my new 700-900 bottle space that I'm planning on building myself and the racking is definitely the most expensive part of the build.
Welsh - build it yourself. I lived in Chicago for a while and the winters there are brutal. But you can turn your Eurocave off if your garage doesn't get below freezing.

My suggestion tho, is build in your basement.

Don't use wood studs and insulation and vapor barriers. Use metal studs and extruded polystyrene. The polystyrene is 24 inches wide. Get 2x6 metal and you can put several pieces of the polystyrene in, then screw in your stud and then repeat. No concern about a vapor barrier because the wall is your vapor barrier.

You'd be building a walk-in cooler - that's how they're built except they're put together offsite and then the walls are assembled on site. You can do it in an afternoon. Insulate the ceiling really well and get a good door. Building the door took me longer than building the cellar. You can buy one but they're never insulated very well.

Instead of sheetrock on the interior, use cement board, at least on the bottom. Then if your basement ever floods, you don't have to replace anything.

You can put it together for a few hundred dollars. And as mentioned, it's the shelving that can cost. You can build your own and save some money, or buy them and spend some money.

Cooling units can be expensive but just get an AC and trick it. the smallest AC you can buy is going to be oversize for your space, so you can get the temp cold enough and won't lose humidity. Good luck.
My wife and I just built a new home and during construction we decide to convert an walk in closet under the stairs to the second floor into a walk in wine cellar. I did tons of research before we attempted this project and I've learned quite a bit. Unfortunately I learned some parts the hard way.

Our "closet" is just shy of 400 cubic feet. It opens onto the living room. Since cost is always a factor and our house project was already way way over budget, I considered the cheapest way I could to refrigerate the cellar. At first I thought a Mitsubishi split ac unit wold work, the cost would be about $1000. It may have worked however I was concerned about not being able adjust it cold enough. We ended up using a Cellarpro 1800 xts with the rear duct kit since we did not want the vent to be into our living room. The total package turned out to be a bit over $2000. Following instructions on the web we had our contractor remove the existing drywall, wrap the room in vapor barrier and completely insulate the room. He then placed MR drywall. For the door we use an exterior rated energy efficient glass door. The contractor price was $3000 including the price of the door. We installed a tile floor the cost was about $150. I have installed 3 rows of double Vintage View wine racks in front to the door and a regular style rack going down the wall. I will be adding at lest one more Vintage View rack on the back wall and at least 4 more columns of racks. Total capacity should be around 550 bottles not including storing cases on floor if needed. The total cost for wine racks to this point is about $1800. I believe I will be spending another $500 to finish it off.

We have been in the house now 5 months. So far the cellarpro system has been flawless, keeping the room at 57-60 degrees and 60% humidity. We are having condensation issues. I had a collection of wood wine crates. I jig saw puzzled them together to cover one of the small walls. I used construction adhesive and finish nailed to hold them in place. About 1 month after this was all done. I noticed that a couple of panels were warping and then they fell off. I investigated and found that there was lots of condensation behind the panels and the rest all basically came off with little effort. Panicked I called my contractor. He come over and we investigated and found the the condensation was limited. We had a couple of access panels and it was wet behind them too. we did some more insulation and put things back to together. I am still having a condensation issue with the wood wine panels. I believe I am going to have to give up on that idea. It was beautiful but unless I can figure out how to stop the water it's going to have to go.

There are a few things I would do differently, The first thing is I would have splurged on cellar cooling split system, Don't get me wrong I like what we have and it works very well but I think the split system might have been better. The other thing is I would have paid someone to spray closed cell foam and then covered it over with something other than Drywall even if it is MR drywall.

Overall we are very happy, it is a show piece for our house and gets comments all the time. Total we have about $7-8 K into this project. I know we could have saved some cash by buying a large wine cabinet or cooler but then we would have had this giant piece of furniture in our relatively small 3 bedroom 1800 sq ft house. Plus how many people actually have a walk in wine cellar in their home?

Kwbonez
Last edited by kwbonez

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