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quote:
Originally posted by JimmyV:
The ratings since the network changed over to more "travel" and "best of" type shows have skyrocketed.


JimmyV,

I read the article and it appears it's the actual cooking shows that helped the ratings. Here's the excerpt from the article:

When the network made its debut on Nov. 23, 1993, its programs were largely instructional and kitchen-based, and those kinds of shows remain popular today. In the third quarter of 2003, ratings for the "In the Kitchen" lineup of how-to-cook shows increased considerably for the weekday and weekend segments.

So, there's still hope. Smile

In any case, I'm still curious to know the profile of the people who watch "Unrapped" over and over again. Confused
quote:
Originally posted by Queen Of Hearts:
The Food Network caters to its market. Clearly many people here are not their market. But there are millions that are.

The "Fine Living" channel is a good alternative. Napa Style and Andrea Immers' wine show are a few notches up over any Food Network show. That's what I watch, although I find some amusing shows on FoodTV and use their website extensively.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://seattle.vinocellar.com


QoH-- I just saw her program last night for the first time and I was going to mention it. It was pretty good, probably the best wine show I have seen. It's still fairly dumbed down, but she does explain things pretty clearly and we have to remember the target audience....

As for Food Network, I need to get a freaking Tivo so I can record Molto Mario and Alton Brown whenever they come on.

www.vinocellar.com -- Mm-Mm-good
The best cooking shows that I have ever seen don't air on the FN, but on PBS and KQED public television. America's Test Kitchen, Ming Tsai, Cooking with the CIA, Lidia, and Jacques Pepin and Julia Child all air on these channels, they are better programs, and best of all, they are free!

However, I could do without Michael Chiarello!!!!
I do watch a few of the shows. Mostly when nothing else is on. Hard to believe that when there are over 200 chanels.

I think Emeral is the biggest pant load on tv. If I never saw or heard him again it would be too soon. Emeral's in Vegas is a crappy and overpriced restaurant to boot.

Alton Brown is OK in small doses. I want that bitchen tea kettle with the revolving rockets.

Anthony Bourdain's show is usually somewhat interesting.

Rachel Ray. Not inspiring to me on "any" level.

More wine shows would be nice but there just aren't that many out there.

Oh well, there is always PBS.

--------------------
"One may dislike carrots, spinach, beetroot, or the skin on hot milk. But not wine. It is like hating the air that one breathes, since each is equally indispensable."

Marcel Ayme`
barca, the problem is that general public in the US cannot comprehend anything of this sort, it's too european. they will probably complain about the accents too. at best, the network minds will highjack the idea, replace cool knowlegable people with non-photogenic morons and send them around the globe to annoy everyone. the approach is the same, as was in the former USSR: don't give the people anything they can't understand, it might make them THINK!

Free Martha!
[QUOTE]Originally posted by grunhauser:
barca, the problem is that general public in the US cannot comprehend anything of this sort, it's too european.

Grunhauser;
You are correct up to a point, now that i think about it, I do not think American TV is allowed to show someone actually drinking wine. However, I think the American audience would appreciate the show. It is very unpretentious and entertaining.
I think FoodTV can use some "sprucing-up". Iron Chef was fun, but the new one is stupid. Captain Kirk should stick with Priceline.com.

The Thirsty Traveller on the Fine Living channel is pretty good, but new shows are necessary. As usual, limited rogramming...

Anybody else like "American Chopper"?

Hey Grunhauser, looks like they're going to
"Free Martha"!

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