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@billhike posted:

Looks like they just announced some beach closings, including Key West.

And cancelled fireworks - not that it is going to do anything.  All of Miami, Fort Lauderdale, rednecks and others seem to have decided to come here and forget their problems and the existence of the pandemic.  I am listening to some vacation renters next door now although  I cannot tell if they are from Miami NY or NJ.  And they are relatively not annoying 

 

 

@irwin posted:

I figure 2020 is a washout. No trips of significance. Very slow at work.  Little restaurant visitation.  It's like I had Tommy John surgery, and I'm on the DL for a year.

This is a good way to look at it.  We are staying afloat at my business, which is better than a number of people I know.  The big question we face is what will school look like this coming year, and will we be faced with home schooling again.  

patespo1:  I'm a huge proponent for schools opening at the end of summer.  I just feel that keeping kids out for another semester would be very detrimental to them, mentally, physically, and educationally. 

The children, for the most part, are less susceptible to the virus, don't infect as much as older people, and there are ways to minimize the risks to families, teachers, school employees, etc.

@Rothko posted:

For some reason I can't cut and paste the link.  But there was a report that came out about a week or so ago.  Wait.  I figured it out.

https://www.clickondetroit.com...experience-symptoms/

This are the type of studies that do studies of other studies.

Ie, look at everyone else's work, not necessarily control for the right variables and see if you can't get any more information out of it that the original researchers didn't or didn't intend to answer.

But even so, the clickondetroit conclusion doesn't exactly match what the study in nature suggests

https://www.reuters.com/articl...us-age-idUSKBN23N1RP

"The findings suggest that school closures - introduced in many countries as part of lockdowns aimed at controlling the coronavirus pandemic - are likely to have a limited impact on transmission of the disease, the researchers said."

or, even if you don't close schools, the old folks are still likely to get it, is what they're suggesting.

So if old folks (and I'll put myself in that category, as I am no spring chicken) are still going to get it, then we should go ahead and open the schools.  As safely as possible.  Are kids going to get infected and bring it home to their families?  I am sure that will occur.  But you try to do everything you can to minimize the risk.

@Rothko posted:

patespo1:  I'm a huge proponent for schools opening at the end of summer.  I just feel that keeping kids out for another semester would be very detrimental to them, mentally, physically, and educationally. 

The children, for the most part, are less susceptible to the virus, don't infect as much as older people, and there are ways to minimize the risks to families, teachers, school employees, etc.

Very much agree with this.  I'm hearing that the (very powerful) teacher's union in Ontario is already setting up to fight to oppose reopening in September and are supported continuing "remote learning."  

It is true that far fewer under 17s get the virus, but there are contradicting opinions as to why. Most people who get the virus don’t spread it and many people who get it spread it to a lot of people.  Because schools did close first and children are mobile at their parents’ discretion, children had less opportunity to contract the virus and far far less opportunity to become super-spreaders. So we don’t really know for sure. 

The opening of colleges is absolutely ludicrous. 

  https://www.sfchronicle.com/ba...pals-in-15381335.php

(There is a paywall for the full article but it amounts to all the principals needing to quarantine because a contagious person came to the meeting about reopening schools.)

Last edited by winetarelli
@Rothko posted:

So if old folks (and I'll put myself in that category, as I am no spring chicken) are still going to get it, then we should go ahead and open the schools.  As safely as possible.  Are kids going to get infected and bring it home to their families?  I am sure that will occur.  But you try to do everything you can to minimize the risk.

That's  HUGE assumption.  and it's really based on the fact that they think americans aren't going to wear masks nor stay at home.  Matter of fact, the US did exactly the same wargames called Crimson Dawn and came to the exact same conclusions.

So it's not the kids, it's everyone else around you.

I, for one, rather my kids be protected and not have to go through the horrors of staying in a hospital.

@winetarelli posted:

It is true that far fewer under 17s get the virus, but there are contradicting opinions as to why. Most people who get the virus don’t spread it and many people who get it spread it to a lot of people.  Because schools did close first and children are mobile at their parents’ discretion, children had less opportunity to contract the virus and far far less opportunity to become super-spreaders. So we don’t really know for sure. 

The opening of colleges is absolutely ludicrous. 

  https://www.sfchronicle.com/ba...pals-in-15381335.php

(There is a paywall for the full article but it amounts to all the principals needing to quarantine because a contagious person came to the meeting about reopening schools.)

what folks dont mention is that the extra clogging platelets that cv19 happens upon the human body is similar to the blood blockage in dengue fever.

Kids have more younger cells and have bodies that can help alleviate the burden of being attacked by the virus, but it doesnt mean they're immune nor there might be long term factors that affect their health when they get older.

but yea i agree totally irresponsible to fly blind just because, money ...

From the LA Times, sometimes a virus can bring good news:

"San Diego — Scott Erskine, who was on death row for the gruesome 1993 abduction and murder of 13-year-old Charlie Keever and his 9-year-old friend Jonathan Sellers — in a case that haunted the county for almost a decade before it was solved — died this week from what prison officials said appear to be complications from COVID-19."

Last edited by The Old Man

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