Skip to main content

@winetarelli posted:

For the record, for anyone else… I tested negative on a rapid at home-antigen test. But I just had a gut feeling, even though the symptoms weren’t too bad, so I went and got the official PCR test, which was positive. My point is, if you think you might have it, don’t rely on at-home testing as definitive.

Only partly agree.  More specifically, the home rapid spike protein Antigen test is less sensitive- ie needs higher titers to read positive.  You could run out and get an expensive gene amplification PCR and  waste time, money and resources, or wait 24-48 hrs and repeat the home test, which inevitably is positive after 2 day incubation. As stated in the NEJM, both choices are effective, and unless clearly immunocompromised and unvaccinated where there is large risk in waiting, or have a vital work or other obligation that can't wait that time,  the latter is wiser and less resource costly.  Remember, if you think you have it and are not dying, diagnosis is safely presumed, behavior is quarantine at home, and treatment is supportive stay at home.  If you have influenza, adenovirus or rhinovirus, behavior and treatment is the same.  I've posted NEJM AMA recommendations below

Rapid Diagnostic Testing for SARS-CoV-2

List of authors.

  • Paul K. Drain, M.D., M.P.H.
  • January 20, 2022
    N Engl J Med 2022; 386:264-272
    DOI: 10.1056/NEJMcp2117115

KEY CLINICAL POINTS

Rapid Diagnostic Testing for SARS-CoV-2

  • Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) that are authorized by the Food and Drug Administration to diagnose severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are either nucleic acid amplification tests to detect genes or antigen-based immunoassays to detect proteins of SARS-CoV-2.

  • RDTs are approved for use in persons with symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) and in asymptomatic persons who are close contacts of a person with Covid-19 or who have been in a potential high-risk transmission setting.

  • Symptomatic persons should undergo testing as soon as possible, quarantine while awaiting test results, and consider retesting if they have a negative RDT, particularly if they have a high pretest probability of infection.

  • Asymptomatic persons with a known exposure to SARS-CoV-2 should undergo testing 5 to 7 days after exposure, and if the RDT is negative, they should undergo testing again 2 days later.

  • Persons with a known exposure to SARS-CoV-2 who are not fully vaccinated should quarantine while awaiting test results, and persons who test positive should isolate, contact a health care provider or public health department, and inform close contacts about the infection.

@napacat posted:

Why are we even testing anymore at this point?  If it is going to be endemic...then what is the point?  And it seems to be getting milder with each variant.

I’ll answer for myself. If I suspect or know I’ve been exposed to someone who has tested positive, I want to ensure I don’t pass it along to my 86 year old mother, who I bring groceries to and visit every week and a half. She still prefers living in her house despite failing eyesight and not being able to drive herself. It’s an hour and a half each way, or I’d see her more often. While there are other people who can help out occasionally, she’s my mother. While vaccinated  and boosted, she is elderly with some other moderate health conditions. I’d be quite upset if I infected her with Covid, or even the flu.

There are multiple cancer survivors at my job. I sometimes come in close contact with them. That should be enough explanation there. Also some front-office coworkers have elderly parents they help care for, and some have children with asthma and other health conditions. If I think I’m sick or contagious, I’ll avoid contact with them as much as possible. An outbreak at work could lead to skilled machinists missing work, which negatively affects our business and that of our customers.

I have access to convenient testing. I care about the collective health and we’ll-being of my friends, family and community. A “milder variant” doesn’t affect everyone the same. So while I’m not always completely vigilant, I’m doing my best to live “normally” while expending a minuscule amount of extra effort to not infect people who may not be as healthy as I am. I’ve had at least four known close exposures to infected persons, some of whom had moderate symptoms including difficulty breathing. One was bedridden for a week. Our CEO, who is athletic and otherwise quite healthy, is still having some lung issues from his bout a year and a half ago. I’m very comfortable with my actions and decisions, no matter what anyone else thinks.

Last edited by billhike
@napacat posted:

Why are we even testing anymore at this point?  If it is going to be endemic...then what is the point?  And it seems to be getting milder with each variant.

I don’t know the science, and would defer to dr. Tannin.  But, the past is not always prologue.

The “mildness” may relate to the vaccinations and boosters. I have a friend who just had a 10 day trial postponed because 3 or the 4 lawyers have tested positive.  One has shortness of breath and other symptoms.  One is a cancer patient with suppressed immunity and one takes care of her elderly parents.

Last edited by irwin
@billhike posted:

I’ll answer for myself. If I suspect or know I’ve been exposed to someone who has tested positive, I want to ensure I don’t pass it along to my 86 year old mother, who I bring groceries to and visit every week and a half. She still prefers living in her house despite failing eyesight and not being able to drive herself. It’s an hour and a half each way, or I’d see her more often. While there are other people who can help out occasionally, she’s my mother. While vaccinated  and boosted, she is elderly with some other moderate health conditions. I’d be quite upset if I infected her with Covid, or even the flu.

There are multiple cancer survivors at my job. I sometimes come in close contact with them. That should be enough explanation there. Also some front-office coworkers have elderly parents they help care for, and some have children with asthma and other health conditions. If I think I’m sick or contagious, I’ll avoid contact with them as much as possible. An outbreak at work could lead to skilled machinists missing work, which negatively affects our business and that of our customers.

I have access to convenient testing. I care about the collective health and we’ll-being of my friends, family and community. A “milder variant” doesn’t affect everyone the same. So while I’m not always completely vigilant, I’m doing my best to live “normally” while expending a minuscule amount of extra effort to not infect people who may not be as healthy as I am. I’ve had at least four known close exposures to infected persons, some of whom had moderate symptoms including difficulty breathing. One was bedridden for a week. Our CEO, who is athletic and otherwise quite healthy, is still having some lung issues from his bout a year and a half ago. I’m very comfortable with my actions and decisions, no matter what anyone else thinks.

+1 on this, I just found out this morning someone I am supposed to golf with tonight was in close contact with another that tested positive yesterday.  I am traveling through 4 states for work in the next 4 days, and by removing contact with this person, as remote as the chances may be, I'm trying to keep from infecting myself and spreading to others. 

My Trump-supporting, anti-vax brother-in-law is now paying the price for his beliefs. He's been sicker than a dog for the past week or so, but is now too embarrassed to go to a doctor & admit it. He attended some function where nearly all of them came down with it. Unfortunately, no one else in his family got the shot, either. He also can't continue his weekly visits to his ailing mother (my mother-in-law), as she has so many preconditions, that even though vaxed, she'd more than likely not survive.  My wife (his sister) is so pissed at him.

@mneeley490 posted:

My Trump-supporting, anti-vax brother-in-law is now paying the price for his beliefs. He's been sicker than a dog for the past week or so, but is now too embarrassed to go to a doctor & admit it. He attended some function where nearly all of them came down with it. Unfortunately, no one else in his family got the shot, either. He also can't continue his weekly visits to his ailing mother (my mother-in-law), as she has so many preconditions, that even though vaxed, she'd more than likely not survive.  My wife (his sister) is so pissed at him.

Can't count the number of times people have told a story like this:  friend or relative is a Trumpanzee who was proud and loud about not getting the shot, then got sick.  Most others though then got treated at least.

@karen983 posted:

I had covid 8 months ago, but I still suffer from some negative consequences. I have high blood pressure, weakness sometimes and insomnia.

A lot is still unknown, but high blood pressure and insomnia are not reported related. Weakness is, and is common, like chronic fatigue syndrome.  Unfortunately, no treatments are available for long COVID.  Meds are only to help with symptoms.

My younger son got it a few days ago at summer camp.  Symptoms aren't too bad, but he lost his sense of taste.

At this point, I am the only one in my immediate family who hasn't been diagnosed with Covid at some point.  Is it really possible I am the "last man standing" or I wonder if I got it but was one of the lucky asymptomatic people.

Although I am the only one in the family who got all 4 jabs.  Maybe this vaccine thingie works??

Rothko, I got all 4 jabs and I'm pretty sure I picked it up on one of my 4 trips during May.  Didn't even realize it for a while.  Then my very mild cold like symptoms slowly started and ramped up over 7 days.  By the time I realized I might have it I was already past it.  But thinking about it in retrospect I do believe I had it.

The latest Omicron variants are just now kicking into high gear.  Stay vigilant but be ready.  The odds are against you sorry to say.

my order of symptoms are,

mild itchy throat, a light cough for 1 day, then i started getting bad GI issues, then on day 2 my bones started getting achy so i grabbed the rapid test.  It was very light but tstill distinct, so i grabbed a second one and same result.

i am super dehydrated right now and my gout got triggered so that kinda sucks

I know this is anecdotal but I know of at least six people that have gotten COVID in this last six weeks and the one thing I can think of they all have in common was they travelled right before or when they caught it.  All six.  Flying versus driving didn't matter.

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker: "I concur, the aircraft is the safest place you can be."

i mean who woulda thought that sitting in a metal can with 300 other people packed together would be the safest place against corona.

I caught it - no traveling though.  Boosters work - Stef had a second booster and I did not because they refused to give it to me as I was then 2 weeks under 50 and I was not able to get one since we got back from the trip due to my trial schedule etc.   Well my symptoms, while not bad, were worse than hers and lasted longer which is the opposite of how our immune systems usually work

@jcocktosten posted:

I caught it - no traveling though.  Boosters work - Stef had a second booster and I did not because they refused to give it to me as I was then 2 weeks under 50 and I was not able to get one since we got back from the trip due to my trial schedule etc.   Well my symptoms, while not bad, were worse than hers and lasted longer which is the opposite of how our immune systems usually work

i mean .. you did just hit 50 =P

So far as I know, I haven't gotten it yet.  Of course, you can get COVID and be asymptomatic, so it's hard to know.  I still wear a mask at grocery stores, and, of course, on airplanes and at airports.   A couple lawyers I know got it recently, were symptomatic, and had to postpone trials.  The newest strain is quite transmissible, apparently.

It's confusing. We started with Greek letters. Then we have BA.1, BA.2, etc. Why not keep using Greek letters? Why BA instead of CD or EF?

@irwin posted:

So far as I know, I haven't gotten it yet.  Of course, you can get COVID and be asymptomatic, so it's hard to know.  I still wear a mask at grocery stores, and, of course, on airplanes and at airports.   A couple lawyers I know got it recently, were symptomatic, and had to postpone trials.  The newest strain is quite transmissible, apparently.

It's confusing. We started with Greek letters. Then we have BA.1, BA.2, etc. Why not keep using Greek letters? Why BA instead of CD or EF?

apparently there's some sense in the madness.  The strain family depends on the genetic marker they're using to track.

Ba.1 Ba.2 have the same genetic tracking marker but have mutations elsewhere.

So i'm getting over it a little right now, just to list out my symptoms for those mildly curious:

mild itchy throat, a light cough for 1 day, then i started getting bad GI issues, then on day 2 my bones started getting achy so i grabbed the rapid test.  It was very light but tstill distinct, so i grabbed a second one and same result.

Day 1 light cough, itchy throat, i thought nothing of it, had GI issues develop at night

Day 2 really bad GI issues, bones and joints got really achy.  Night time was alot of cold sweats and a terrible headache

Day 3 was the worst, bed ridden, terrible headaches, constant hot and cold body temp change, coughing, chest pains

Day 4 Still have headaches and night sweats but no more GI issues, coughing and sneezing

Day 5 head is very clogged, mild coughing, occassional sneezing, able to properly sleep without the cold sweats.  Still taking advil for the headaches.

so it feels like i'm on the mend thankfully.  Will take a rapid test probably in 2 days to see if i'm still testing positive.

@g-man posted:

So i'm getting over it a little right now, just to list out my symptoms for those mildly curious:

mild itchy throat, a light cough for 1 day, then i started getting bad GI issues, then on day 2 my bones started getting achy so i grabbed the rapid test.  It was very light but tstill distinct, so i grabbed a second one and same result.

Day 1 light cough, itchy throat, i thought nothing of it, had GI issues develop at night

Day 2 really bad GI issues, bones and joints got really achy.  Night time was alot of cold sweats and a terrible headache

Day 3 was the worst, bed ridden, terrible headaches, constant hot and cold body temp change, coughing, chest pains

Day 4 Still have headaches and night sweats but no more GI issues, coughing and sneezing

Day 5 head is very clogged, mild coughing, occassional sneezing, able to properly sleep without the cold sweats.  Still taking advil for the headaches.

so it feels like i'm on the mend thankfully.  Will take a rapid test probably in 2 days to see if i'm still testing positive.

Sorry to read you had such a rough go of it. I had moderate cold symptoms — mostly similar to bronchitis with post nasal drip and some sinus soreness — tested negative at-home but positive at the PCR doctor. Began Paxlovid 40 hours after 1st symptoms, symptoms lasted 3 more days and after that it was just a coughing fit at night which got progressively more mild every night for 2 weeks.

Everyone in my family got it, looking back my wife probably first last weekend. she had massive GI issues and then fatigue so we thought it was food poisoning at first. Then my 12 year old on Monday came home with a migraine. Monday night I woke up in the middle of the night with my arm throbbing where I had all my vaccines (last one was in January) and feeling like I just got hit by a truck. Rapid tests for everyone and we all had it. Seven year old never had symptoms, my wife still can barely keep her eyes open but is otherwise fine once the GI cleared up after about 24 hours, 12 year old slept for a day and now has a cough but felt fine from Wednesday onwards. For me Monday and Tuesday we're rough, massive body aches and fatigue, then my chest felt like I just did a run in -40 dry cold. Constant burning and short of breath, but otherwise getting better. That's still there but lessening daily. Now I feel almost back to normal with a moderately tight chest but the kicker is yesterday afternoon over the course of about 5 hours I completely lost my sense of smell. Zero left. Can open a jar of coffee, take a huge wiff and can't smell a thing. Can identify sweet, bitter, sour, salty but can't taste beyond that.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×