i opted for a bottle of NV Lanson's Black Label, and a 2010 John Anthony Sauvignon Blanc Church Vineyard. I liked the Lanson more as a wine, but the JA worked better with the food.

Indy, I thought about, and read about, reds. I just couldn't see how it would work, and after my meal, I can't see how a red would've complimented the dish. It was a spicy cioppino, made with clams, mussels, scallops, swordfish, rosemary roasted tomatoes, clam stock, champagne, etc. I eyed a tempranillo, but for my palate, this kind of dish begs for a crisp white with plenty of acidity and a "cool" character to balance it out.

anyway, thanks as always for the ideas. Next time I'll make this for a group, and see how it doe with a red, but I was pretty happy with the wines i opened.
With a red, you'd have to be really careful. Tannins and heat can be very unpleasant. Big or super-ripe fruit would overpower the dish. Higher than typical acidity in the wine will help it from being overpowered. Cioppino can also negate a lot of complexity. I'd look for a rustic traditional Italian.

That said, the best pairing I've had was an Arcadian Chardonnay. The acidity stood up to the tomatoes, and the complexity played very well with the fish.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
Cioppino and Anchor Steam is a great match.


Cioppino is a dish native to the San Francisco Bay Area. I think it should be served with a drink native to the area as well. Anchor Steam is a great call. We usually have a lot of SCM Chardonnay and Pinot Noir open when serving Cioppino. I prefer the white, others though mix and match. yhn is always way at the other side of the table so I'm never sure what he's drinking.
They would have been drinking Zin/Mataro blends for reds and, Sauvignon Blanc and Colombard/Chenin blends for whites. Chardonnay would have been drunk mainly in the South Bay since it was planted at Almaden and the Mountain Winery(Mount Eden Clone) and in Livermore (Wente Clone).

Pinot Noir was bottled only at the Mountain Winery. Almaden had some in the field and it went into a 'Gamay' blend with Pinot St George and other red grapes.

Just because we think of those grapes as 'fancy' now, doesn't been they were thought of as such then. Cabernet Sauvignon was rarely planted and not much desired by anyone in the 19th century. Bring it on I know this stuff Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
They would have been drinking Zin/Mataro blends for reds and, Sauvignon Blanc and Colombard/Chenin blends for whites. Chardonnay would have been drunk mainly in the South Bay since it was planted at Almaden and the Mountain Winery(Mount Eden Clone) and in Livermore (Wente Clone).

Pinot Noir was bottled only at the Mountain Winery. Almaden had some in the field and it went into a 'Gamay' blend with Pinot St George and other red grapes.

Just because we think of those grapes as 'fancy' now, doesn't been they were thought of as such then. Cabernet Sauvignon was rarely planted and not much desired by anyone in the 19th century. Bring it on I know this stuff Smile


That's pretty interesting. You hear people talking about wine and food pairing and often going with the local wines with specific regional dishes. It's interesting to see how quickly (in less than 100 years) the typical profile of what a regional wine can change. Probably what constitutes regional dishes can change too. Or maybe that's just a new world phenom.
Cioppino is pretty subject to specific locals too. Here in the South Bay there are more tomatos and garlic than you'd find in the North Bay. There are also people who insist that the crab should go in the stew and others who think it should be seperate. I call those groups the 'wrong' group and the 'right' group and you'll get a debate from each side.

Local Portuguese consider it 'their' dish here too, so Italian wine is kind of an insult.

Good question about regional chang too. Last week we had friends from Brittany cook Gallettes in our home for friends. Buckwheat flour, ham, goat cheese and fresh eggs. Chenin Blanc. Makes you think though the food had to follow the wine and that we do pairing backwards trying to match a wine to the food.
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Cioppino is pretty subject to specific locals too. Here in the South Bay there are more tomatos and garlic than you'd find in the North Bay. There are also people who insist that the crab should go in the stew and others who think it should be seperate. I call those groups the 'wrong' group and the 'right' group and you'll get a debate from each side.


This must be unique to the bay area. I can't imagine there would be any disputes like that over Bouillabaise in Marseilles or Cassoulet in Toulouse. You must be a contentious lot out there. Razz


quote:
Good question about regional chang too. Last week we had friends from Brittany cook Gallettes in our home for friends. Buckwheat flour, ham, goat cheese and fresh eggs. Chenin Blanc. Makes you think though the food had to follow the wine and that we do pairing backwards trying to match a wine to the food.


That's actually pretty believable. If you live in a place where you've got a great wine wouldn't you adjust your recipes so as not to stomp on its characteristics and then refine from there?

Wine guy at Eataly suggested frappato or vernaccia. Tried a frappato blend (Occhipinti SP68) and it was ok -- it needed time to breathe and was better by the end. Also had open a St. Cosme Cotes du Rhone blanc 2017 Les Deux Albion. Thought that was (very approximately) like a vernaccia. It really sang with the cioppino -- despite being a little flat without food on its 2nd day open. I'd go for a floral but not flabby white next time, CdR or try actually vernaccia.

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