I just went through several top 40 to top 75 lists, not one of them mentioned go, which I liked a lot.  And only one of about 6 lists mentioned Metropolitan.  

I'm not saying go is the best film of all time, but it is a genuinely solid movie and half the films on these lists are dreck.  Obviously, Metropolitan is almost as much a filmed play -- but it is excellent.

Any other oft-overlooked favorites?  Or favorites that everyone likes?

Last edited by winetarelli
Original Post
winetarelli posted:

Any other oft-overlooked favorites?  Or favorites that everyone likes?

I'm not sure about being overlooked or that everyone likes, but Love Actually is an annual movie for us.   The scene at Selfridge's between the late Alan Rickman and Rowan Atkinson is one of my all-time favorites.

winetarelli posted:

Also, only one list had Trading Places, though I'm not certain I identify that as much with Christmas...

How could that not be Christmas?

winetarelli posted:

I just went through several top 40 to top 75 lists, not one of them mentioned go, which I liked a lot.  And only one of about 6 lists mentioned Metropolitan.  

Until your post, I'd never heard of either one of those movies.  Perhaps I'll give them a look.

thelostverse posted:
winetarelli posted:

I just went through several top 40 to top 75 lists, not one of them mentioned go, which I liked a lot.  And only one of about 6 lists mentioned Metropolitan.  

Until your post, I'd never heard of either one of those movies.  Perhaps I'll give them a look.

go is a very good film.  It is Doug Liman's follow-up to Swingers.  And while it never received cult status, I enjoyed it as much.

 

Metropolitan is Whit Stillman's first and best (imo) film.  There are aspects of it that are brilliant in how his bright, upper class, 18 year olds talk to each other.  I saw it for the first time when I was 19 or 20 and couldn't believe someone had actually gotten the cadence and attitudes of speech so right.

We rewatched Scorsese’s Hugo last night. In 3D. Such a charming film that made even non-film buffs appreciate the groundbreaking work and sheer ingenuity of Méliès. I love how Scorsese wrapped up a film history lesson and a plea for film preservation/restoration in a thoroughly entertaining Hollywood family film.

It was a nice antidote to The Irishman which we watched the night before. Not a bad film, but not great. Disappointing after reading all the hype. In his canon of mob movies, it was no Goodfellas. Or even Casino. As Mrs Sunnylea said, we’ve seen this film before... and better. Even Ray Donovan has more compelling storytelling and acting.

One positive: I was expecting the digital de-aging to be distracting but I thought it was remarkably well done. Didn’t bother me at all. 

Historically we've always watched Going My Way and The Bells of St. Mary's during the holiday season. Since being little on my grandfather's lap I've always had a soft spot for Der Bingle and I could watch Ingrid Bergman in a dish soap commercial. 

The other two must watches are The Snowman and A Child's Christmas in Wales. The Snowman is a beautiful little thing, wonderfully scored by Howard Blake and produced by John Coates which always makes me chuckle. A Child's Christmas in Wales is of course a poem by the great Dylan Thomas and the film adaptation features Denholm Elliott.

winetarelli posted:
thelostverse posted:
winetarelli posted:

I just went through several top 40 to top 75 lists, not one of them mentioned go, which I liked a lot.  And only one of about 6 lists mentioned Metropolitan.  

Until your post, I'd never heard of either one of those movies.  Perhaps I'll give them a look.

go is a very good film.  It is Doug Liman's follow-up to Swingers.  And while it never received cult status, I enjoyed it as much.

 

Metropolitan is Whit Stillman's first and best (imo) film.  There are aspects of it that are brilliant in how his bright, upper class, 18 year olds talk to each other.  I saw it for the first time when I was 19 or 20 and couldn't believe someone had actually gotten the cadence and attitudes of speech so right.

Probably saw for first time in 1994 - when as recent college grads, FKG and I moved to NYC for her first job in fashion industry and law school for me.

This and Kicking and Screaming were in regular rotation in those days (substantial cast overlap  - and Chris Eigeman was basically in everything good in the early/mid 90s

If you like Metropolitan - be sure to see Barcelona and the Last Days of Disco - 

jcocktosten posted:
winetarelli posted:
thelostverse posted:
winetarelli posted:

I just went through several top 40 to top 75 lists, not one of them mentioned go, which I liked a lot.  And only one of about 6 lists mentioned Metropolitan.  

Until your post, I'd never heard of either one of those movies.  Perhaps I'll give them a look.

go is a very good film.  It is Doug Liman's follow-up to Swingers.  And while it never received cult status, I enjoyed it as much.

 

Metropolitan is Whit Stillman's first and best (imo) film.  There are aspects of it that are brilliant in how his bright, upper class, 18 year olds talk to each other.  I saw it for the first time when I was 19 or 20 and couldn't believe someone had actually gotten the cadence and attitudes of speech so right.

Probably saw for first time in 1994 - when as recent college grads, FKG and I moved to NYC for her first job in fashion industry and law school for me.

This and Kicking and Screaming were in regular rotation in those days (substantial cast overlap  - and Chris Eigeman was basically in everything good in the early/mid 90s

If you like Metropolitan - be sure to see Barcelona and the Last Days of Disco - 

Metropolitan > Barcelona > The Last Days of Disco. But I like all of them (and love Barcelona and Metropolitan).

 

And, yeah, I don’t know why Chris Eigeman didn’t stay relevant. 

Last edited by winetarelli

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