I love it, and it sure goes down easy. For some reason I trust a restaurant to serve me raw beef, but doing it myself gives me pause. Carpaccio is at least 25 miles away from me. Perhaps the best route to go is to ask the butcher for a prime piece of filet and see if they will slice it real thin.
Or you can slice it yourself. Just toss the beef in the freezer for 15-20 minutes or so to firm up some and make it easier to slice.
So you must make it at home then, Futronic? I never would have thought to put it in the freezer to firm it up, thanks. I guess what I am looking for is people or someone who has done it and lived to tell about it, and who did not get severe diarrhea.

I have this book that recommends freezing the beef for 14 days to kill pathogens, but I cannot imagine restaurants doing this and I think it would affect the quality of the meat.
I've only made it at home the one time, but it's easy.

Step 1 - find a good butcher that you trust and get a good piece of tenderloin.

Step 2 - see step 1.

Anyway, some people like to sear the outside of the tenderloin, then freeze it to firm up, then slice. Personally I don't bother.
spo brings up a good point about pathogens. It's my understanding that virtually all of the "raw" sushi that is eaten has been previously frozen, to kill undesirable critters, (i.e. bacteria and nematodes), and is required by law in the U.S.

Anybody know of similar regulations for raw mammal?
I look at it like a diet plan..

anytime I wish to be adventurous but knowing that I may possibly need to drop 10 pounds in a hurry...
step 3, have a very good slicer!

no the freezer thing works!

you can even smoke a center cutt tenderloin rare
then put it in the freezer -then slice

when i was working in Palm Beach we use to put most of the veal in the freezer and the slice !
no waste! an even slice's
Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
spo brings up a good point about pathogens. It's my understanding that virtually all of the "raw" sushi that is eaten has been previously frozen, to kill undesirable critters, (i.e. bacteria and nematodes), and is required by law in the U.S.

Anybody know of similar regulations for raw mammal?


Paging Een!
Bah, people need to have a little more faith in good butchers and produce purveyors.

If you're got a really good carving knife (thin, thin blade - not serrated!), that works wonderfully.
I called my local buther, not the carnaceria Razz and they said they would run it through the slicer for me, no problem. No cooking, nothing to clean, score. Cool
Why not get yourself an inexpensive mandoline? Personally, I'd go to Williams-Sonoma and get a decent stainless steel one. Every kitchen should have one.

I've got 2 Cuisinart food processors. My wife sometimes uses one when she's preparing doughs, but I don't recall the last time I used one for slicing. The mandoline is so much easier to use and to clean up.
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
Bah, people need to have a little more faith in good butchers and produce purveyors.



It's not like a good butcher can tell if beef is from "the wrong side of the nematode tracks." Many pathogens and other undesirables are smaller than even the best butcher can detect. But, it works for g-man, and beauty queens in South America. Not trying to be gross, just helpful (in my own special ib way, Wink ).

Yes, paging Een indeed.
Does this mean you also cook your pork to the federally suggested 160F (or worse, the 170F that is usually on a meat thermometer)

I'll leave the turkey to 185F alone.

Razz
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
Does this mean you also cook your pork to the federally suggested 160F (or worse, the 170F that is usually on a meat thermometer)


Razz


Nope, don't eat it. Razz Razz
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
Man, you're really missing out!


On what?


Proscuttio, cappicola, salami, pepperoni, pork chops, pork tenderloin, bacon is there anything I am forgetting?
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
I forgot pork rinds (chicarones)and pigs feet.


Well, in that case! Cool

More pork for you folks, I'll survive, somehow. Pork carpaccio anyone???
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
Proscuttio, cappicola, salami, pepperoni, pork chops, pork tenderloin, bacon is there anything I am forgetting?


head cheese
coppa
pancetta
trotters
My wife has made carpaccio a number of times, using the freeze it then cut it then method. To be honest, it is difficult to slice it as thinly as a restaurant by hand, but it's pretty close and tastes just as good.

What does everyone put on their carpaccio? We've used thinly sliced romano or parmagianno cheese, capers and either simple extra virgin olive oil or a dijon mustard blend.
ok sold.. just called the wife and asked her to pick up a tenderloin. If you do it at home, how long in the freezer prior to cutting?

Also, what are your favrotie wines with carpaccio?
For you at home chefs...meat should be chilled not frozen...two hours may be too long depending on the size of the filet.

2 minutes ago...meat was a little frozen, I tried to cut, now I am looking at two large cuts- on my thumb and ring finger. Don't think I need to go to the hospital but a bad start.

Feeling like an ass but I thought I'd share...now i need to go tend to the wounds- dripping blood on the keyboard.
quote:
Originally posted by jgreen:
For you at home chefs...meat should be chilled not frozen...two hours may be too long depending on the size of the filet.

2 minutes ago...meat was a little frozen, I tried to cut, now I am looking at two large cuts- on my thumb and ring finger. Don't think I need to go to the hospital but a bad start.

Feeling like an ass but I thought I'd share...now i need to go tend to the wounds- dripping blood on the keyboard.


Dull knife?
No..I sharpened it before cutting...meat just too frozen. If I'd have waited 5 minutes it would've been fine.


Also, rather than hammering, recommend using a rolling pin.

Tasted great (after applying band aids).
So, how did you serve it?

I personally like it with some thin Parmigiano, rucola, olive oil and pinoli (I think it translates into English as pine nuts). This also the way I'm used to get it served in Italy. Sometimes I throw in some 'sun-kissed' tomato.
How we served...in the center, arugula dressed with olive oil, sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Carpaccio with sea salt , fresh pepper, olive oil and capers. thats it...

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×