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I'm planning a fancy dinner and would like the main course, red wine braised short ribs, to look impressive. I want to serve them without the bone, and was considering putting the meat inside some homemade ravioli or "pasta pillows" vs. putting it under a flaky, baked puff pastry. If I go with the latter, I don't want the dish to look/taste like beef pot pie. Has anyone tried anything like this? Thanks in advance.
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I dunno... I don't think you have to hide short ribs to make them fancy. Like futronic suggested, add truffles-- or chanterelles, or morels, or all 3, if you want to dress them up. Once they're boneless, they're already fancy enough IMO.

Make an "island" of mashed potatoes in the middle, put the ribs and sauce around, stick a couple twigs of rosemary or thyme at the top of the potatoes... If that doesn't impress your hoity-toity friends, tell them to get the hell out of your house, call me, and I'll come over and eat it myself.

And I'll even bring my own wine and napkin, too!
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Seaquam; Oh baby! You know what I like! Is tha quoting Little Richard or who?


At first I thought you meant Little Richard brought his own wine and napkin to places. Big Grin Then I realized you were talking about "Oh baby, you KNOW what I like." That's from 'Chantilly Lace' by Jerry Lee Lewis.

That's the music from a better time, when wine was something we could easily steal from our parents' liquor cabinet and bad wine was as good as great.
All the feedback is much appreciated. Braised ribs are one of my favorite dishes; I have cooked them many times, and agree that de-fatting and reducing the braising liquid makes the best sauce to go with the meat.

I just think that a big chunk of reddish black meat, with or without an attached bone, is not the most elegant presentation. Thus the interest in putting the meat inside some big ravioli or under a puff pastry.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Seaquam; Oh baby! You know what I like! Is tha quoting Little Richard or who?


At first I thought you meant Little Richard brought his own wine and napkin to places. Big Grin Then I realized you were talking about "Oh baby, you KNOW what I like." That's from 'Chantilly Lace' by Jerry Lee Lewis.

That's the music from a better time, when wine was something we could easily steal from our parents' liquor cabinet and bad wine was as good as great.


Well Jerry Lee did put out a version in '72, but it was first recorded and wrote by The Big Bopper in 1958.
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Seaquam; Oh baby! You know what I like! Is tha quoting Little Richard or who?


At first I thought you meant Little Richard brought his own wine and napkin to places. Big Grin Then I realized you were talking about "Oh baby, you KNOW what I like." That's from 'Chantilly Lace' by Jerry Lee Lewis.

That's the music from a better time, when wine was something we could easily steal from our parents' liquor cabinet and bad wine was as good as great.


Well Jerry Lee did put out a version in '72, but it was first recorded and wrote by The Big Bopper in 1958.


How old are you people!!

Braised Short Rib done right tastes good...no doubt in Ravioli, reminds me of the Ruth's Criss app of osso bucco Ravioli they have....which is really nice!
My philosophy with braised short rib is whatever carbohydrate you use for the dish must have the ability to take up the juice/sauce from the meat. That said, given your two choices I'd go with puff pastry (a nice homemade ravioli rolled by hand with a wood roller on wood cutting board is another option...the porous wood creates small pockets in the pasta for sauce to absorb better). Personally though I would do some sort of mashed potato or polenta- something to soak up the love and goodness of the braise. A nice homemade polenta with a clean, good portion of braised short rib on it centered on a large plate can be quite "fancy" and definitely delicious!
Try rolling the braised ribs up in individual sheets of puff pustry - ike a Beef Wellington.

Make sure you make some ventilation holes in the pastry otherwise you'll be picking bits of exploded pastry out of your oven over the next 3 months.

Try using some of the solids from the braising liquid along with the ribs for extra flavour.

For dressing up the puff pastry brush with an egg wash and then sprinkle the case with some chopped rosemary and sea salt.
quote:
Originally posted by Javachip:
My question with the ravioli idea is, how do you get enough meat inside the ravioli to be able to appreciate the tenderness and flavor of the meat? I have not made homemade ravioli before.


That's easy. Make big ravioli. Use a 4" ring mold to cut the pasta. Depending on what course this is, that will determine how many to serve. I find 3 is more than enough for a first course.
quote:
Originally posted by Chilepepper:
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Seaquam; Oh baby! You know what I like! Is tha quoting Little Richard or who?


At first I thought you meant Little Richard brought his own wine and napkin to places. Big Grin Then I realized you were talking about "Oh baby, you KNOW what I like." That's from 'Chantilly Lace' by Jerry Lee Lewis.

That's the music from a better time, when wine was something we could easily steal from our parents' liquor cabinet and bad wine was as good as great.


Well Jerry Lee did put out a version in '72, but it was first recorded and wrote by The Big Bopper in 1958.


How old are you people!!





Why? What's the minimum age requirement??

Jeez, I feel like I'm being carded! Smile Thanks for making my day, Chile baby!!
I just had a "beef stew" at Mistral in Vancouver that was exquisite and beautifully presented and then I tried to copy it at home.

I did a red wine mirepoix braise on nicely trimmed short ribs. Skimmed the fat and reduced the braising liquid. I find that just using this reduced liquid produces a rather thin, acidic sauce so this time I mixed about a cup of that liquid with a cup of veal demi-glace. Made this into a gravy that had a tremendous depth of flavour. With a bit of dijon for balance and butter for sheen and I was quite happy.

I piled the short ribs on some steamed beets, and turnips and topped with new carrots. In a white bowl, this looked very nice.

My favourite soaker with this type of gravy is pomme frites but since I don't have duck fat or a deep fryer on hand, I did some thin sliced pan rosemary roasted potatoes that were well salted. I served these on a side plate to keep them nice and crisp and then dipped them into the gravy.

Turned out quite well, I thought.
Conscious:

Instead of braising solely in red wine, add a bunch of veal stock (or chicken stock if you don't have it). Then you don't have to worry about the demi-glace later, and your sauce is basically built in.

I strongly encourage use of homemade stocks, as purchased stocks (especially the popular tetra-pak kinds or using bouillon cubes) have lots of salt and could result in an excessively salty sauce as it reduces.
Hey Futronic,
I didn't specify that braising liquid did indeed contain a homemade chicken stock. While that balances the flavour, I don't find that I get the thickening that I'm looking for when I reduce that liquid. I find that a straight veal stock reduced significantly into a demi-glace has so much natural gelatin that it becomes very viscous and when I add some of the braising liquid I get the texture I want without adding flour.

Other's seem to prefer more of a jus, or don't mind adding flour to thicken the sauce, and in those cases reducing the braising liquid seems to work out well. I'm just addicted to demi-glace so I like to add it wherever I can Popcorn
Thanks to all for the comments. I finally opted for braised short rib ravioli. It was my first foray into homemade ravioli. Lots of fun, though I made the beginner's mistake of overfilling the ravioli, causing many of them to split open. The braising liquid reduced into a very nice savory sauce under the ravioli. I used Trader Joe's Organic Chicken Stock in the 32 oz. tetrapack (not low sodium), augmented with fresh parsley, carrot and celery during braising. The result was not too salty; in fact additional salt was needed at the table. Both ends of the wine world were represented: two bottles of Charles Shaw merlot for braising, and a bottle of Lafite Rothschild for drinking. Cheers!

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