Hi there, 

I want to buy a case of Bordeaux wine to drink on my Sons birthday when he becomes 18 or 21. He was born in 2012. 

Besides that it has to be a great wine, I want to put an impressive wine on the table  

I consider Ch. Mouton Rothschild, Ch. Lafleur but Petit Cheval also might be an option but will a wine like that make it till 2033? 

Budget is up to € 550 a bottle. 

Advise is very welcome.

Kind regards,

Jan Willem

 

 

Original Post

I mean, to be honest, there is a mountain of quality difference between Petit Cheval and Lafleur.  Yes, the Petit Cheval will make it another 10+ years, but it is just no where near the quality of Lafleur (or Mouton).  

Of the high end, Lafleur is my favorite right bank wine.  (I've never had a good vintage of Petrus or any vintage of Le Pin, though.)  However, Haut-Brion is my favorite Bordeaux overall and can be a little less expensive than other similarly situated in stature Bordeaux (both banks).

There are a lot of left bank wines less expensive that Petit Cheval I would choose above it: Montrose, Cos d'Estournel, Leoville Las Cases, Pichon Baron.  And Palmer is a bit more than Petit Cheval but much less than first growths.

Note: I haven't had any major chateau 2012s yet.  I'm basing all of this upon older vintages.  I have had 2012 Poujeaux twice, however, and it seems to be a decent, probably slightly early maturing vintage.

Edited to add:  You are looking for a case.  I'm not certain when the other 11 bottles are to be consumed.  All of these wines will be in fine form in 2030 or 2033.  2045 is a different story.  If the idea is one bottle a year for 12 years starting in 2033, your best bet may be a first growth or else Leoville Las Cases.

Last edited by winetarelli

Regardless of vintage, you'll never go wrong with Haut Brion. Outperfoms in middling to poor vintages and shines just as bright as its peers in good to great ones. 

robsutherland posted:

Regardless of vintage, you'll never go wrong with Haut Brion. Outperfoms in middling to poor vintages and shines just as bright as its peers in good to great ones. 

I co-sign this.

If your intention is to impress and you have that sort of budget, I would go with the Lafite.  Even if you don't drink it, it will significantly appreciate in value assuming reasonable storage conditions.  Older vintages of Chateau Montrose continue to impress me- I would personally go with that. Agree with Haut Bion comments.

i don't think you intended to include Petite Cheval in this list- I think you intended to include Cheval Blanc which is the grand cru from that producer.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×