Can anyone suggest the best red wine to cook with? I am trying recipes that use wine. Most call for red wine, but I do not drink red wine often, and would prefer to use the right type of wine to cook with. Thank You!
Original Post
Cotes-du-Rhone or something from Jumilla like a Finca Luzon are what I often use. Since I pretty much never need a whole bottle for cooking, I want something I can enjoy while cooking.
Personally, I like to use wine that would go with the food being prepared, eg. Chianti in red pasta sauce.

But whatever you use, just don't use something you wouldn't drink. Some make the mistake of cooking with wine they dislike or has flaws, like being corked.
you're kidding, right? you do realize cork taint burns off which makes it almost the perfect wine *to* cook with, right? Roll Eyes

quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
But whatever you use, just don't use something you wouldn't drink. Some make the mistake of cooking with wine they dislike or has flaws, like being corked.
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
you're kidding, right? you do realize cork taint burns off which makes it almost the perfect wine *to* cook with, right? Roll Eyes

quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
But whatever you use, just don't use something you wouldn't drink. Some make the mistake of cooking with wine they dislike or has flaws, like being corked.


No, not kidding. I'd done the plastic baggie trick for corked wines, but did not know that the flavor/smell goes away completely with heat.

Have others had the same experience?
gman said the temp for actually burning off is 284 but i seem to recall it being much lower(i could easily be wrong).

i've also read that it binds to fat(oil, cream etc) which diminishes it's affect basically to undetectable but again, i am not stating that as a fact.

regardless, i am highly sensative to tca and i use it to cook with all the time and cannot detect it when i do use it. so maybe i've just diluted to the point of invisibility?
Cooking with corked wine seems kind of analagous to drinking pee. Apparently you can do both and neither will hurt you. That being said, I'll go with other options unless there aren't any!

Agree with Cotes du Rhone or other drinkable but not overly tannic wines. Inexpensive Pinot with Coq au Vin. etc.......

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Cooking with corked wine seems kind of analagous to drinking pee. Apparently you can do both and neither will hurt you.


Well, I can not state that neither will hurt you, as I have never cooked with corked wine. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Wine On Line:
Can anyone suggest the best red wine to cook with? I am trying recipes that use wine. Most call for red wine, but I do not drink red wine often, and would prefer to use the right type of wine to cook with. Thank You!


I love cooking with village level nebbiolo as they have nice acidity, fruit and are great to drink while cooking.
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
i've also read that it binds to fat(oil, cream etc) which diminishes it's affect basically to undetectable but again, i am not stating that as a fact.


A good chemist can probably break it down better, but the plastic baggie trick for TCA taint might yield similar results as cooking with a lot of oil, due to the non-polarity of the two, which helps remove TCA. Perhaps adding a corked wine to a lean red sauce might be dubious, while adding a corked wine to a rich creamy sauce might be just fine?
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
gman said the temp for actually burning off is 284 but i seem to recall it being much lower(i could easily be wrong).

i've also read that it binds to fat(oil, cream etc) which diminishes it's affect basically to undetectable but again, i am not stating that as a fact.

regardless, i am highly sensative to tca and i use it to cook with all the time and cannot detect it when i do use it. so maybe i've just diluted to the point of invisibility?
Maybe true. I can't stand the smell of a corked wine and won't cook with it because I don't want to taste anything that used to smell like that. Even if it doesn't anymore.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Umm...so, whe you have drank pee...
Razz


Well, it was not mine! Smile


Darn! I thought the Vichyssoise hid it well!
a freshly laundered vag can smell and taste like honey when just moments before it smelled of....oh never mind... Cool

quote:
Originally posted by Gigond Ass:
Maybe true. I can't stand the smell of a corked wine and won't cook with it because I don't want to taste anything that used to smell like that. Even if it doesn't anymore.
i wish gman would weigh in here, he had some interesting points yesterday via text message, espicially when i introduced onions and garlic into the equation...

quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by TBird:
i've also read that it binds to fat(oil, cream etc) which diminishes it's affect basically to undetectable but again, i am not stating that as a fact.


A good chemist can probably break it down better, but the plastic baggie trick for TCA taint might yield similar results as cooking with a lot of oil, due to the non-polarity of the two, which helps remove TCA. Perhaps adding a corked wine to a lean red sauce might be dubious, while adding a corked wine to a rich creamy sauce might be just fine?
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Umm...so, whe you have drank pee...
Razz


Well, it was not mine! Smile


Darn! I thought the Vichyssoise hid it well!


Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Umm...so, whe you have drank pee...
Razz


Well, it was not mine! Smile

Eek And you were giving a hard time to PH for him referencing his lavender teddy!

The hypocrisy!
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Umm...so, whe you have drank pee...
Razz


Well, it was not mine! Smile

Eek And you were giving a hard time to PH for him referencing his lavender teddy!

The hypocrisy!


Oh, I have a lot of stories from college. Red Face
There is no hard rule for picking a variety of wine. Some dishes might benefit from a wine with more fruitiness, others might benefit from a wine with more acidity. But many of our recipes calls for dry red wine, and in general, that includes Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Shiraz/Syrah, Zinfandel, Sangiovese, and Cabernet Franc.

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