Hi,

I was looking for someone who would be willing to help me out with wine pairings for a site that I run. I’m completely ignorant of wines, so I would appreciate the assistance of someone that knows what they are doing.

I run a site that is dedicated BBQ and I would like to have a series of brief articles (maybe four) with each article pairing specific wines with a particular type of BBQ.

If you would be willing to help out, I would love to hear from you. I don’t want to post the url here as I’m not trying to spam the forums, but I would be happy to answer any emails sent my way.

Thanks for reading.

Eric Devlin
saberinc@verizon.net
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
best with a dry rub and no add'l saucing. Wink

Dry rub, look to the best from Argentina, trust me.
Their wines are made for such meat!

I've been looking for just the right pairing for a monstorous Vina Cobos. Thanks W+A! Wink
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
So apparently the Alabama white is a blend of mayo, vinegar and lemon juice with some other stuff including cayenne. Anyone want to take a whack at pairing with this? Confused
PH

Mayo, vinegar and lemon juice. All the ingrediants that do NOT pair well with wine.

Urrr..Gin and Tonic? Smile
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
So apparently the Alabama white is a blend of mayo, vinegar and lemon juice with some other stuff including cayenne. Anyone want to take a whack at pairing with this? Confused
PH

Mayo, vinegar and lemon juice. All the ingrediants that do NOT pair well with wine.

Urrr..Gin and Tonic? Smile



I never touch mayo. I know weird, but never. Red Face
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I never touch mayo. I know weird, but never. Red Face


Here as well. I will, on RARE occasion, order a grilled panini that is said to have a flavored aioli and then I will ask for them to go very light on the aioli. But mayo? Ew.


I'm right there with ya !
My #1 rule is BBQ generally needs a beer. #2, look to those cultures who exist soley on flame broiled meat or grilled meat and you'll find the answer. Argentina and Australia, Malbec and Shiraz. With grilled meat it's hard to beat Malbec in my opinion, or Bonarda or even an Argentinian Shiraz/Syrah (yes, they're out there and they're great).

Of course once you start slopping sugary, spicey sauces all over the place matching becomes very difficult indeed. At this point I reach for the very best Sam Adams lager or a Stella, January vintage.
First, certain things require mayo: BLT, turkey & avocado, tuna salad. However, please don't slop it all over my burger.

Second, I lived in Argentina for a while and the BBQ there is not like anything you have ever seen - Texas/Southern BBQ included.

Imagine large wood-fired grills covered with beautiful steaks, chorizo, pork, chicken, and parts of bovine previously believed to be inedible. Eek

And that's just the BBQ, dont get me started on the gnocchi.

Anyway, I had always believed that when it came to grilled meat it was Cab, Shiraz, and nothing else. However, Malbec is quickly becoming one of my favorite pairings - especially with a dry rub.

Now, if Winter would kindly get out of the way, I can get back to my patio.
When we do large tailgaters (200+) we have used cases of Yellowtail Shiraz magnums from Costco. Pretty good wine for our pit bbq, ribs, bisket, pulled pork and chicken. Also go through a couple kegs of beer. Folks have appreciated and enjoyed the Shiraz.
Zinfandel with BBQ is almost a no brainer, but I also think it depends on how much acids you are putting into the sauce. If you are putting in lots of vinegar and/or lemon then you could try a Riesling. I know...I know...I can hear you grumble now, but I find Rieslings make for great pairings when it comes to Asian-style BBQ sauces. An off-dry Riesling with sweet and sour - quite nice it is.
quote:
Originally posted by Walla2WineWoman:
Zinfandel with BBQ is almost a no brainer, but I also think it depends on how much acids you are putting into the sauce. If you are putting in lots of vinegar and/or lemon then you could try a Riesling. I know...I know...I can hear you grumble now, but I find Rieslings make for great pairings when it comes to Asian-style BBQ sauces. An off-dry Riesling with sweet and sour - quite nice it is.
I definitely have to agree with a riesling. It compliments a semi spicy BBQ sauce really well.
As others have noted Zinfandel is a very obvious choice but I have found one Zinfandel in particular works out in most of my BBQ situations. That is Martinelli Jackass Vineyard Zinfandel. It has the right balance of spice and jam and, at 16-17% alchohol, it has enough heat to compliment the BBQ style.

Just my humble opinion and experience.
quote:
That is Martinelli Jackass Vineyard Zinfandel. It has the right balance of spice and jam and, at 16-17% alchohol, it has enough heat to compliment the BBQ style.


That's enough heat to actually light your BBQ. Wink

If all people make are Hamburgers, Steaks and Ribs I guess there are stock wine answers like Zinfandel, beer and whatever for some, but I put seafood, veggies, Pork and everything in between on my grill (as others do here)with different seasonings so I pair my wine with the what I am cooking that day - inside or outdoors.

Having a "BBQ wine" or standard varietal means you need to learn to cook more things on your grill
besides cheeseburgers Razz

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