I did not last evening, but the griller used aluminium foil for a bunch of items.

Under the marinanated chicken
Under the tomatos

Was wondering with the acid & the heat about the amount of taste transference there might be from the foil to the food.

I personally avoid any baked potato that is baked in foil.
Original Post
Never notice the flavor of aluminum on bbq, sauce and smoke tends to overpower. However I do pick up on it when people use it with tomatoes and mild fish. The acid definately reacts with the foil and you can see it transfer the aluminum onto the food (those little pits you see in the foil is the transfer of the aluminum flavor crystals onto your food).
I have never detected a difference and am a huge fan of wrapping things in foil and tossing them on the grill. I guess I'm going to do a side by side potato.


quote:
Originally posted by Erin Wino:
I did not last evening, but the griller used aluminium foil for a bunch of items.

Under the marinanated chicken
Under the tomatos

Was wondering with the acid & the heat about the amount of taste transference there might be from the foil to the food.

I personally avoid any baked potato that is baked in foil.
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
quote:
Originally posted by vin:
aluminum flavor crystals
Confused

Acidic foods, such as dishes with tomato sauce, fruit juices, vinegars, etc..., that are cooked or wrapped in aluminum foil and/or stored in the refrigerator can "eat" or corrode small holes in the foil wrap. Point in case is if you bake a lasagna and have aluminum foil touching the top you will see these little holes and when you remove the foil you will see little grey specks on the food. The specks (or as I like to call them aluminum flavor crystals) are not dangerous but some (I can) can taste the metalic flavor in the food. They teach you this in culinary school. You might not notice it w/ fish or veggies that are tossed on the grill due to their lesser cooking time (some people can pick up on the taste easier than others). You won't see it on a baked potato because of the lack of acid. In lots of professional kitchens you will see chefs (not smart ones) put a layer of plastic wrap before sealing w/ foil. This is worse. The plastic wrap breaks down in the heat and releases chemicals in the food. Parchment paper is the best thing to use to provide a buffer between the food and foil in these cases.
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
I was more confused by your terminology. Especially the flavor part, as I don't think of the metallic taste of aluminium as a "flavor".


I guess I'm sensitive to metallic flavors or taste Wink. I can taste blindly the differance in flavor between iodized salt and kosher. The iodized always taste metallic to me. I've won some money off of proving this before.
You should let food come to room temp before wrapping in plastic first anyway. But good tip, Vin, on using parchment under foil instead of plastic wrap.

One of my favorite things to eat is baked spuds where the skin gets nice and crispy in the oven. Scoop out the potato and discard! I'm all for a pat of butter in the skin with some S&P and eat away. Can't get that texture by wrapping a spud in foil.
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
I was more confused by your terminology. Especially the flavor part, as I don't think of the metallic taste of aluminium as a "flavor".

It is if you ever get that metallic, kinetic taste if metal hits your fillings just right. Eek

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