Bella Dumba, if I ever do become senile, I will still be a lot more intelligent than ribeye blending, blanching in flour, car tenderizing, cheddar cheese topping, brain dead Bella Dumba who can't select a loaf of bread without starting a series of ridiculously stupid threads.
Another safety tip Bella must have forgot to mention, don't forget to put the car in park after tenderizing the ribs.

Never heard of lamb baby back ribs but they sound like they would be pretty good. Maybe braised with some middle eastern spices and served with couscous? Let us know how you end up preparing them and how they turn out.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
Bella Dumba, if I ever do become senile, I will still be a lot more intelligent than ribeye blending, blanching in flour, car tenderizing, cheddar cheese topping, brain dead Bella Dumba who can't select a loaf of bread without starting a series of ridiculously stupid threads.
Shut up you old cranky impotent dentist.
quote:
Originally posted by ArieS:
I made some braised lamb neck a couple of weeks ago and it was really good Smile


Arie, I love braised lamb. My question about the ribs is whether to grill them like pork baby back ribs or braise them. Grilling should be easier. If I buy them, I'll probably try them both ways.
I really like my lamb kind of rare. I wonder how to pull this off with this particular cut. I know pork baby backs benefit from very slow, low heat cooking, but I'm not looking for any pink in my pork. What to do with these? I wouldn't want to cook the life out of them....

PH
With a high quality piece of pork, you don't have to be too hghly concerned any more if you like it a little juicier. You also don't have to cook baby back ribs all that slow either for a great dish. If you use a very hot sear first, you can finish them in the oven at a med-low temp (300-ish) for 30-40 minutes and be very happy with the results.

I found a very nice F&W recipe that whereas is not for ribs, still looks very good. Here it is.

Lamb Shanks, Osso Buco-Style

ingredients
1/4 cup vegetable oil
8 lamb shanks (1 1/4 pounds each), fat trimmed
Salt and freshly ground pepper
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
12 garlic cloves, finely chopped
4 medium onions, coarsely chopped
4 medium carrots, halved lengthwise and cut into 1-inch pieces
2 large celery ribs, cut into 1/2-inch dice
One bottle (750 ml) dry red wine
One 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
2 1/2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth
Three 3-inch-long strips of orange zest
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1/4 cup coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley

directions
Preheat the oven to 325°. In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the vegetable oil. Add 4 of the lamb shanks, season with salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat until well browned all over, about 10 minutes. Transfer the shanks to a large roasting pan. Repeat with the remaining vegetable oil and shanks. Pour off the fat.
Heat the olive oil in the same skillet. Add the garlic, onions, carrots and celery and cook over moderate heat until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the wine, bring to a boil over moderately high heat and simmer for 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes, stock, orange zest, oregano and 2 tablespoons of the parsley and bring to a boil. Pour the mixture over the lamb and cover with foil. Braise in the oven for about 3 hours, or until the lamb shanks are very tender.
Increase the oven temperature to 350°. Transfer the lamb shanks to a large, deep baking dish, cover with aluminum foil and keep warm. Pour the sauce and vegetables into a large saucepan; discard the strips of orange zest. Simmer the sauce over moderate heat, skimming the surface occasionally, until richly flavored, about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and pour it over the lamb shanks.
Cover the dish of lamb shanks with foil and bake for about 10 minutes, or until they are heated through. Set a lamb shank on each plate and spoon some of the sauce over and alongside. Garnish with the remaining 2 tablespoons of parsley and serve.
Board-O
A braise and a grill is dead easy and very little work.
1. Put the ribs in a roasting pan with liquid and seasonings of choice cover with foil and put in the oven for a couple of hours at 250
2. Take a nap.
3. Wake up and take ribs out.
4. Put them on the grill and apply sauce of choice.
5. Once ribs have crisped a little take them off and serve.
Easy and delicious.

Even easier than the braised lamb shanks as there is no browning or reduction of sauce. Don't fear the braise, even Bella could pull off these recipes Wink

If I can find this cut of lamb in my area I'll buy it and try it.

PH,
I like my lamb on the rare side too, but tough cuts like ribs and shanks need the long slow cook to melt the connective tissue so you end up with fall off the bone meat. Undercooked ribs are not much fun to eat.
Board-O,

I've enjoyed lamb ribs on many occasions.
I really like the tenderness of these ribs.
I find them to be delicious, especially when prepared by my aunt.

Unfortunately, my aunt has been ailing for quite some time and does very little cooking now, but her seasonings of garlic, rosemary, black pepper, worchestershire sauce; etc., is something I attempt to emulate a few times a year.
Board-O,

There is a recipe in Louis Osteen's book Charleston Cuisine for grilled lamb ribs. He used to be the chef at the Charleston Grill. I have had them and they are excellent. He uses racks as you describe, grills them, and serves them with a shallot-pepper butter. I will be happy to provide more details in the future if you are interested.
quote:
Originally posted by DebAnne:
Board-O,

I've enjoyed lamb ribs on many occasions.
I really like the tenderness of these ribs.
I find them to be delicious, especially when prepared by my aunt.

Unfortunately, my aunt has been ailing for quite some time and does very little cooking now, but her seasonings of garlic, rosemary, black pepper, worchestershire sauce; etc., is something I attempt to emulate a few times a year.


DebAnne,

Sorry your Aunt is ailing. Please do ask her if she's up to it, to try to share her recipe with us! Sometimes the oldest recipes are the best. Even if it's close, it'll be worth trying, I'm sure.

PH
Board-O,

It's my understanding the rack for roasting or chops with the strip of meat is from the back section of the lamb, towards where the ribs meet the backbone. The rack of ribs you are referring to is towards the breast on the rib cage, without the strip of meat. They would fit together top to bottom like a puzzle. I could be wrong on this as always, and would love clarification if necessary.
I've never had them, but if they look like baby back ribs, I put 3-4 stalks of celery in a large covered baker to use as a rack with flavor, a few bay leaves and about 2 cups of water. Place ribs on top with seasoning salt of your choice, cover and bake in a 300 degree pre-heated over for about 2 1/2 hours and then glaze them until the glaze has set on the ribs. I made a glaze with leftover pinot noir on put it on sme baby back ribs and they were tender, and the glaze was good.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
The butcher had these today. I've never seen them before. Anybody ever have them? How did you make them and how were they?

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