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quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
We are considering a work by Ed Moses. One of our art consultants brought to our attention that the last several pieces we have bought are from artist all well into their 80's. We were asked if we are hedging our purchases. Big Grin

Seen lots of Moses' work around LA. He's a lesser known LA hero. Of course if I had a brain I would have bought something when we first enjoyed him about 20 years ago.


A L.A. artist indeed.

He has a solo exhibit coming to Santa Fe soon. ( Charlotte Jackson)
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
Just secured a booth at Spectrum for Art Basel week in Miami this Dec.

Thrilled, stoked


Winner

Wonderful news, fcs. What artist are you exhibiting? I'm trying to work in a trip in December ( Florida) to hook up with a friend. Hmmm... Smile


W + A, showing a wide range of work, mostly from lowbrow/Juxtapoz magazine genre.
Michael Sieben is from Austin, and is probably the most famous skateboard artist working today. Had a solo at the UTexas museum recently. Orig and prints.

Also D*Face, Shepard Fairey, Jim Phillips, Scott Teplin, Scott Musgrove as well as a few others, including work from yours truly Smile!

If you are in Wynwood Dec 3-7, look for space 802b at Spectrum or contact me so I can VIP your group:
Paul@sevenartsgallery.com
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
Just secured a booth at Spectrum for Art Basel week in Miami this Dec.

Thrilled, stoked


Winner

Wonderful news, fcs. What artist are you exhibiting? I'm trying to work in a trip in December ( Florida) to hook up with a friend. Hmmm... Smile


W + A, showing a wide range of work, mostly from lowbrow/Juxtapoz magazine genre.
Michael Sieben is from Austin, and is probably the most famous skateboard artist working today. Had a solo at the UTexas museum recently. Orig and prints.

Also D*Face, Shepard Fairey, Jim Phillips, Scott Teplin, Scott Musgrove as well as a few others, including work from yours truly Smile!

If you are in Wynwood Dec 3-7, look for space 802b at Spectrum or contact me so I can VIP your group:
Paul@sevenartsgallery.com


fcs, thank you for your reply, and I hope for the very best you and your gallery and exhibit in Miami.

I will email you shortly.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Took in the Alex Colville show at AGO yesterday. Wide-ranging and informative, it spans Colville's seven-decade career. I love the works that while appearing somewhat tranquil on the surface, hint at imminent or recent danger. Or at least a much deeper story that the viewer needs to piece together for themselves.

Like this

Or this.


Illustration is underrated as an art form. Those pieces are great...
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Took in the Alex Colville show at AGO yesterday. Wide-ranging and informative, it spans Colville's seven-decade career. I love the works that while appearing somewhat tranquil on the surface, hint at imminent or recent danger. Or at least a much deeper story that the viewer needs to piece together for themselves.

Like this

Or this.


Thanks for sharing, VinT.

I like the surreal like piece. Reminds me of Giorgio de Chirico.
Our recent trip to New York was in part to walk the great Breuer ( Lajko) building known as the Whitney Museum once more before its closing and relocation.

I love great architecture that is worthy of a visit even without any art. The Whitney has been such a treasure in its current location over the last four decades, and it will be missed as it is now closed. I have high expectations for their new building opening in May of 2015, and always look forward to seeing any work by the great Renzo Piano.

I have such fond memories of so many great exhibits over the years at the Whitney that have enriched my life like millions of fellow art enthusiast.
Recently got back from NYC and the Matisse cut out exhibit at MOMA is a must see if you love art and have access. The 1 hour earlier opening for museum members is needed to fully enjoy the exhibit. Joining the museum to get that less crowded time is worthy of discussion. I came away fully understanding how important this cut out period was in Matisse's evolution as a great artist. His oils are amazing but so are his cut outs.

IW
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Our 'signed limited edition' Chagall prints finally arrived and are safely on the wall. Were they actually signed by Chagall? Probably not, but we don't care. We are happy to have them as permanent guests in our home.

A ma femme

Lovers over Paris

Smile


VinT, congratulations to you and C.

I know we talked via email about these prints, but I cannot recall, do you know the year and the printers name?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Our 'signed limited edition' Chagall prints finally arrived and are safely on the wall. Were they actually signed by Chagall? Probably not, but we don't care. We are happy to have them as permanent guests in our home.

A ma femme

Lovers over Paris

Smile


VinT, congratulations to you and C.
I know we talked via email about these prints, but I cannot recall, do you know the year and the printers name?

Each arrived with a suspect-looking 'Certificate of Authenticity', which I will check this weekend for the printer and date information.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
Our 'signed limited edition' Chagall prints finally arrived and are safely on the wall. Were they actually signed by Chagall? Probably not, but we don't care. We are happy to have them as permanent guests in our home.

A ma femme

Lovers over Paris

Smile


VinT, congratulations to you and C.
I know we talked via email about these prints, but I cannot recall, do you know the year and the printers name?

Each arrived with a suspect-looking 'Certificate of Authenticity', which I will check this weekend for the printer and date information.


Okay, sounds good.

They do not look like works from Albert Carman's in New York. ( 1940's)
Tate Liverpool - cool Warhol exhibit was on display. Highlight:...we watched this 5-minute film, "The Coat," by Keren Cytter, intriguing and bazaar; we were all a bit befuddled by it. As we were watching, my 3-year-old asked, as if he were requesting more carrots or to turn the light on in the bathroom..."What's happening to my mind?" Simply, priceless.
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
Tate Liverpool - cool Warhol exhibit was on display. Highlight:...we watched this 5-minute film, "The Coat," by Keren Cytter, intriguing and bazaar; we were all a bit befuddled by it. As we were watching, my 3-year-old asked, as if he were requesting more carrots or to turn the light on in the bathroom..."What's happening to my mind?" Simply, priceless.


Cool
Back from a recent trip...
Centre Pompidou, kids enjoyed this quite a bit, esp the Koons retrospective. The entire 6th floor was closed however (until April) Frown
Pinacotheque de Paris - A Klimpt/secessionist exhibition. What appeared to be the entire Beethoven frieze, Judith and a few lessen known works. Schiele and Kokoschka also represented. Highly recommended if in Paris, on display until mid June.
Musee Picasso - Wow!
Would have liked to have gone to another art museum (Musee de arte modern de ville de Paris, would have been the choice), but it was a short trip (5d/4n).
I've been very drawn to grand scale photos recently. Massimo Vitali has always appealed to me with his perspective from up high and the over-exposed expanses of his shots.

Recently I discovered Stephen Wilkes who takes thousands of shots of one scene throughout the day and evening. He then stitches elements of those shots together to create incredibly detailed and beautiful scenes that are part daylight and part nighttime. His print of Coney Island is one we would love to get someday.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I just read that William Louis-Dreyfus ( father of Julia) will start giving away some of his multi-billion dollar fortune. He is going to sell off his $50M art collection and give the proceeds to the Harlem Children's Zone. Cool


thanks for the info W&A. I thoroughly enjoyed the art in the documentary. Interesting perspective.
W+A, how about this Bjork/MOMA brouhaha?

And a plug for our MOCA from the LA Times, "In the meantime, to any museum that wants to do shows tied to popular culture and be taken seriously, may I suggest you pay a visit to Kahlil Joseph's video installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (an institution that has had its own issues in the past with staging exhibitions that are too much pop and not enough culture). Joseph's installation shows that ideas that emerge from the popular culture can be smart and relevant, not to mention downright hypnotic."
W+A mentioned the Droit de Suite, and for those that are unaware here is what that is:

a right recognized by the legislation of several member countries of the European Union whereby an artist, or his or her heirs, is entitled to a share of the price of a work of art if it is resold during the artist's lifetime or for 70 years after his or her death.

IW
I'm in Vegas this week and found myself in the Wynn on two different occasions. One of the Koons Popeyes is on display in the hallway with a pair of "custodians" on either side of the velvet rope. I spent a few moments each time trying to admire it, but I just can't do it. It's brash and gaudy to me. Perhaps if I cared to understand more of the background my appreciation for the piece might improve, but I just don't see it. It's almost phallic in that look at how big I am and as the owner some of that power surely most transfer to me.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm curious just how high the great Les Femmes d'Alger work will be sold for at auction today.

It can be argued this is the greatest work of Picasso's still in private hands.

Estimated to go as high as $140M

+$15M. Or at least that's the number I'm giving my bidder.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm curious just how high the great Les Femmes d'Alger work will be sold for at auction today.

It can be argued this is the greatest work of Picasso's still in private hands.

Estimated to go as high as $140M

+$15M. Or at least that's the number I'm giving my bidder.


I will take the over. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm curious just how high the great Les Femmes d'Alger work will be sold for at auction today.

It can be argued this is the greatest work of Picasso's still in private hands.

Estimated to go as high as $140M


$179.3M... An absolute steal!

I was outbid!
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm curious just how high the great Les Femmes d'Alger work will be sold for at auction today.

It can be argued this is the greatest work of Picasso's still in private hands.

Estimated to go as high as $140M


$179.3M... An absolute steal!

I was outbid!


It's always that last $300K, you're so close but mentally just can't do that little bit more... Big Grin
Went to Andrea Rosen, Gagosian, Mary Boone, Jonathan Levine, Hoerle-Guggenheim, and Freight/Volume yesterday.

Gagosian's shows are high-impact b/c of his use of scale. The shows always make you feel little because the works are so massive. Also reminds you of what is possible when a lot of money is combined with a talented artist's imagination
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
Went to Andrea Rosen, Gagosian, Mary Boone, Jonathan Levine, Hoerle-Guggenheim, and Freight/Volume yesterday.

Gagosian's shows are high-impact b/c of his use of scale. The shows always make you feel little because the works are so massive. Also reminds you of what is possible when a lot of money is combined with a talented artist's imagination


Cool See you soon now in Santa Fe.
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
Went to the Picasso museum in Barcelona today. I'm by no means knowledgable about fine art, but the man was prolific if nothing else.



Bill, I look forward to reading all about your trip. Sounds like you are having a grand time.

Picasso, the greatest artist since the High Renaissance, and glad you saw a few of his 50,000 works.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
We bought two new works this week, and may pick up one more today.

We really need to stop as we have far more than we can ever display, but nothing gives me more joy than art. Cool

How do you feel about having a W&A art wing in Scottsdale or Utah?


I like the Scottsdale idea! Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
We bought two new works this week, and may pick up one more today.

We really need to stop as we have far more than we can ever display, but nothing gives me more joy than art. Cool

How do you feel about having a W&A art wing in Scottsdale or Utah?


I like the Scottsdale idea! Cool


Please submit photos of proposed artworks for the Scottsdale wing of the W&A art collection. Allow 2-4 weeks of review by the Scottsdale Board of Directors for appropriateness of the artworks for display.
sunshades bart
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Today is the birthdate of in my opinion the greatest painter ( not artist) the world has ever known. Diego Velazquez would have been 416 today. Cool

I don't know, when we're talking about painters remember what Franz Liebkind said, "Hitler... there was a painter! He could paint an entire apartment in ONE afternoon! TWO coats!"
Dropped into the Franklin Bowles gallery in New York this past weekend and spent an hour with Matt Hannan, one of the consultants there, viewing the current exhibition along with some of the artists they represent and have on display.

The current exhibition is by Gottfried Salzmann, an Austrian artist, whose current exhibition is really impressive. He does some collage work, but the pieces that impressed me the most were from a series of watercolors of New York from the perspective of a helicopter. Beautiful pieces that kept me going back and discovering more each time I walked by. Being relatively naive in art and with a few watercolor painters in my family who have focused on wide sweeping natural landscapes, I've always associated watercolor with these types of scenes. But the detail Salzmann is able to achieve in these paintings is incredible and really opened my mind to where watercolor can be used.

One of the artists they rep is Eduardo Arranz-Bravo, a Spanish artist, who spent time painting with Miro. Being a huge fan of Miro, I was deeply impressed with Arranz-Bravo's pieces, which show some influence of Miro, but tend to explore more deeply the shades of the palate he is using, while using similar techniques to draw the eye to specific areas with hints of color or light. We are seriously considering the purchase of a piece of his that we loved and would like to have in our home.

The gallery also has some more minor Matisse, Picasso, Dali and Miro pieces. Matt was terrific and it was a pleasure to spend an hour with him learning about the Arranz-Bravo and Salzmann.

If you are in Soho, its certainly worth a drop in to see the current exhibition and some of the works of the artists they rep.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I was at an art event last night, and much of the buzz was around all the post-war art that has been acquired recently for the soon to be opening Broad Museum. These new purchases and their already stunning holdings should make for a special opening.

A few of the names I heard were, Twombly, Wool, Longo and Baldessari.

Sept. 20th. Let me know when you're coming.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I was at an art event last night, and much of the buzz was around all the post-war art that has been acquired recently for the soon to be opening Broad Museum. These new purchases and their already stunning holdings should make for a special opening.

A few of the names I heard were, Twombly, Wool, Longo and Baldessari.

Sept. 20th. Let me know when you're coming.


On my radar for sure. Not only for the art, but the building as well.
We spent a few interesting hours today mainly enjoying the Alex Colville exhibit in the National Gallery in Ottawa. The attention to detail in his works is slightly reminiscent of Norman Rockwell, but a bit fuzzier. There's also an element of discomfort in most of his paintings, and sometimes it takes a bit of time to discover the source. Fascinating, but also a bit challenging I think.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
We spent a few interesting hours today mainly enjoying the Alex Colville exhibit in the National Gallery in Ottawa. The attention to detail in his works is slightly reminiscent of Norman Rockwell, but a bit fuzzier. There's also an element of discomfort in most of his paintings, and sometimes it takes a bit of time to discover the source. Fascinating, but also a bit challenging I think.

Your comments closely mirror mine.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
We spent a few interesting hours today mainly enjoying the Alex Colville exhibit in the National Gallery in Ottawa. The attention to detail in his works is slightly reminiscent of Norman Rockwell, but a bit fuzzier. There's also an element of discomfort in most of his paintings, and sometimes it takes a bit of time to discover the source. Fascinating, but also a bit challenging I think.

Your comments closely mirror mine.



I think we'll have a train and a horse to discuss in a couple of weeks then. And please bring your photo of w+a's new acquisition.
Between bouts of fine wine quaffing and stuffing ourselves with great food in Montreal this past weekend, we made time for two gallery visits. Musée des Beaux-Arts has a remarkable Rodin exhibition featuring 300 works, many never before seen in North America. I now have a greater appreciation of just what a creative force Rodin really was. Also on display was a 40+ year retrospective of works by Montreal artist Marion Wagschal, with whom we were unfamiliar before this show. Fascinating work whose dreamy qualities seemed influenced by Chagall, Goya and more than a touch of Lucien Freud. Highly recommended.

Our other visit was to view David Altmejd's fantastical constructs at Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal. After a few hours in the company of these surreal, painstakingly assembled works, some filling entire rooms, I'm certain our brains were sore from being stretched in so many new directions. Lots of fun as long as I'm not asked to interpret what it all means. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
We spent a few interesting hours today mainly enjoying the Alex Colville exhibit in the National Gallery in Ottawa. The attention to detail in his works is slightly reminiscent of Norman Rockwell, but a bit fuzzier. There's also an element of discomfort in most of his paintings, and sometimes it takes a bit of time to discover the source. Fascinating, but also a bit challenging I think.

Your comments closely mirror mine.

We took in the show twice during its Toronto run. I've always admired Colville's work and it was a thrill to see such a comprehensive retrospective. We always go early in the day when the gallery is relatively empty so we can spend time with each painting without constant distractions.

Colville's work always struck me as a bit off-kilter, both in terms of style and content. His figures seem to be pasted into the frame like a collage. So many of them have no cast shadows:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pini...896db93e681cd3c6.jpg

His stippled technique - not quite pointillism - also gives his paintings a surreal feel.

And then there's the content: he rarely shows faces. They're invariably turned away from the viewer, or have objects in front of their faces, or at the very least they're in profile, looking into the distance. I feel like a voyeur when I look at his paintings; the people in the paintings are unaware that I'm watching.

Then there are the exceptions - often self-portraits - which are the complete opposite, and the subject is staring down the viewer:

http://www.ago.net/assets/imag...stol-and-Man-660.jpg
I love Colville's work. If you are a fan, Christopher Pratt from Newfoundland is much in the same vein. His wife Mary is a fantastic artist herself (and probably the more famous) but Christopher's work really speaks to me.

Amazing man as well. I had lunch with him a number of years ago at his studio in St. Mary's where he showed me a number of paintings he wasn't happy with, some of which were really wonderful. He was burning them one by one as we ate. It was heart wrenching.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
I love Colville's work. If you are a fan, Christopher Pratt from Newfoundland is much in the same vein. His wife Mary is a fantastic artist herself (and probably the more famous) but Christopher's work really speaks to me.

Amazing man as well. I had lunch with him a number of years ago at his studio in St. Mary's where he showed me a number of paintings he wasn't happy with, some of which were really wonderful. He was burning them one by one as we ate. It was heart wrenching.


We were just talking about Mary Pratt a couple of days ago! Some of her works are currently displayed in the National Gallery in Ottawa-- jam jars that are remarkably realistic, like a very sharp photograph. We were pretty impressed, and went back to see them a second time before we left the gallery.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
I love Colville's work. If you are a fan, Christopher Pratt from Newfoundland is much in the same vein. His wife Mary is a fantastic artist herself (and probably the more famous) but Christopher's work really speaks to me.

Amazing man as well. I had lunch with him a number of years ago at his studio in St. Mary's where he showed me a number of paintings he wasn't happy with, some of which were really wonderful. He was burning them one by one as we ate. It was heart wrenching.


We were just talking about Mary Pratt a couple of days ago! Some of her works are currently displayed in the National Gallery in Ottawa-- jam jars that are remarkably realistic, like a very sharp photograph. We were pretty impressed, and went back to see them a second time before we left the gallery.

Was this the show that's been traveling the country for the past 2 years? If so, it was remarkable! We saw it at the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg. Another major retrospective like the Colville show.

It was interesting to watch the films where she demonstrated her methodology - she takes photographs and projects them onto the canvas as her guideline - and directly addressed her detractors who have said she's more of a copyist than an artist.

Really it's not much different than artists who draw a grid on the canvas as well as on their original source material... Or those who painstakingly measure the location of key points in the source material so that they can replicate the proportions on the canvas.

I've tried all three methods my own paintings, and I've painted without any guidance. It really depends on what I'm trying to achieve.

Ultimately, what Mary Pratt achieves when she applies the paint to the canvas isn't something that just anyone with a projector can achieve. It takes real skill and talent. Her ability to capture refracted and reflected light is phenomenal.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
I love Colville's work. If you are a fan, Christopher Pratt from Newfoundland is much in the same vein. His wife Mary is a fantastic artist herself (and probably the more famous) but Christopher's work really speaks to me.

Amazing man as well. I had lunch with him a number of years ago at his studio in St. Mary's where he showed me a number of paintings he wasn't happy with, some of which were really wonderful. He was burning them one by one as we ate. It was heart wrenching.

Very cool, Rob! I agree about the throughline from Colville to Christopher Pratt. I met him briefly a year or two ago when he had a show at a gallery in Yorkville.
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
Wife and I just spent 4 fantastic days in Santa Fe with W + A and his lovely wife. Great food, great art, hiking, the works.

However, W + A, you gave us both hangovers, so any buyer's remorse over art sold to you is cancelled out by the excessive wine you made us drink Razz

Thanks again, mate. Super fun week!


It was a great few days, fcs. We look forward to your next visit.

The three pieces we bought from you are at the framers, and the sculpture will be installed next week we have be advised. Cool
Took in the current "Picturing the Americas" exhibition today at the Art Gallery of Ontario, along with the Emily Carr exhibition. Not a huge fan of Carr, but it was worth it to see her progression as an artist - her move from fastidious and rather boring landscapes to bold, cubism-inspired works in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and her later loose, fluid work (literally, as she painted with a mix of oil paint and gasoline).

The Americas exhibition of landscapes was exhaustive and often repetitive. But a few pieces jumped out. My favourite, by leaps and bounds, was the massive Niagara Falls (1878) by William Morris Hunt. Impossible to get a sense of its power - and the paint technique - from this little image:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/w..._-_Niagara_Falls.jpg

I also loved the exquisite realism of Albert Bierstadt’s Yosemite Valley (1868):

https://upload.wikimedia.org/w...Yellowstone_Park.jpg

...and Georgia O’Keeffe’s Black Mesa Landscape, New Mexico/Out Back of Marie’s II:

http://artseverydayliving.com/...ack-of-mary-s-ii.jpg

We also headed up to the top floors to see the exhibit by Stephen Andrews, a Toronto photographer and contemporary artist.

And for me, no visit to the AGO would be complete with a stop to once again see Kent by Chuck Close. Mesmerizing.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
Wife and I just spent 4 fantastic days in Santa Fe with W + A and his lovely wife. Great food, great art, hiking, the works.

However, W + A, you gave us both hangovers, so any buyer's remorse over art sold to you is cancelled out by the excessive wine you made us drink Razz

Thanks again, mate. Super fun week!


It was a great few days, fcs. We look forward to your next visit.

The three pieces we bought from you are at the framers, and the sculpture will be installed next week we have be advised. Cool


Superb! I would love to see both of them. Send pics to the fan club!
quote:
Alberto Gálvez


like his color choices, limited palette and "quiet" tones.


Just saw that Broad Museum storage picture. First painting I saw was that big George Condo piece. Do any of you have an opinion on this guy's work?
I see the varied technique, but his subject matter is one portrait after another. My $.02
After a quick trip to Seattle to view the actual works on display, we bought a beautiful piece of sculpture by Washington State's Will Robinson. We already have one of his works, but there were 4 in this exhibition that I loved and had trouble choosing from, though cost and display space severely limited me to just one.

In any event, a few of you know that I've been looking to acquire a large sculpture for our entranceway for some time now. I'm very excited that the quest is finally over. Now I just have to be patient until mid-October for delivery. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
Congrats Seaquam!

+1

Looking at the works via the link provided I cannot help but notice a seemingly phalic influence in several of his pieces. Not all, certainly, but more than enough to be notable. Now I'm not suggesting that you have sought out such a piece for your home entrance...but if you did so be it and I applaud your style. Wink

That said, I also appreciate his use of natural materials and their interweaving to contemporary shape. Well Done, Seaquam. I've no doubt that the piece will be stunning upon entry to your home.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
Congrats Seaquam!

+1

Looking at the works via the link provided I cannot help but notice a seemingly phalic influence in several of his pieces. Not all, certainly, but more than enough to be notable. Now I'm not suggesting that you have sought out such a piece for your home entrance...but if you did so be it and I applaud your style. Wink

That said, I also appreciate his use of natural materials and their interweaving to contemporary shape. Well Done, Seaquam. I've no doubt that the piece will be stunning upon entry to your home.


First off, congratulations to Sea and S.

Sea, I could not help but notice you failed to mention your new piece for your bathroom you sent me. Razz

Please forward me a photo of your new sculpture. Also, I'm guessing VinT shared a picture with you of our new 6' sculpture.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:

Looking at the works via the link provided I cannot help but notice a seemingly phalic influence in several of his pieces. Not all, certainly, but more than enough to be notable.




Uh-oh! The piece we bought is indeed a bit phallic, but it also has a large round hole in it. Now I feel a bit confused and disoriented by this purchase.

I think I may have to discuss this with my therapist. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
Uh-oh! The piece we bought is indeed a bit phallic, but it also has a large round hole in it. Now I feel a bit confused and disoriented by this purchase.

I think I may have to discuss this with my therapist. Big Grin

Big Grin

Thank you for the link sent, Seaquam. I beautiful piece indeed and much less phallic than other works I viewed.

The painting in your bathroom however... Eek
Entertaining indeed! I would be concerned, however, of anyone spending an extraordinary length of time there and might feel inclined to check the surrounding porcelin afterwards Wink

A super piece, btw.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
...the Alfred Taubman art collection... One of the very finest personal collections I know of.

Curious upon what you base your statement, w+a. Diversity, specific artists, specific pieces, themes?

There are several individuals whose collections would completely eclipse the Taubman collection.
So simply, sincerely, curious.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
...the Alfred Taubman art collection... One of the very finest personal collections I know of.

Curious upon what you base your statement, w+a. Diversity, specific artists, specific pieces, themes?

There are several individuals whose collections would completely eclipse the Taubman collection.
So simply, sincerely, curious.


K, oh my goodness. If D was not telling to me to open the next bottle.... Soon, my dear friend. Big Grin
K, I have been a fan of his collection for well over 30 years. I seriously doubt he owns a single piece of art that I would not only love, but admire. The sheer depth for me from what I consider to be the finest periods in all of art ( too may ebbs and flows, and we know which we are now under) is beyond impressive.

High Renaissance, German Expression, Emerging Modern, true Modern, ( 1906-1956) Dada, sculpture, NY school, Abstract Expressionist, finest Pop, slight touches of American and limited contemporary. Equally important for me are the periods he chose NOT to collect. Wink

A few if I may ... Raphael, Durer, Gainsborough, Cezanne, Homer, Modigliani ( so few in private collections) Picasso, Klee, Villon, Schiele, Feininger, Richter, Stella, Ruscha, Hopper, Johns, Pollack, Warhol, de Kooning and a few Rothko's to boot.

It appears the two day sale will break the all time auction record well north of $500M. I'm curious what the family has elected to keep!
Preview of the Broad's first show

I've seen a lot of the Broad collection over the years and this part of the review sums up some of my feelings about his opening of this monument to himself (remembering that originally he had promised his collection to LACMA:

quote:
Dead ahead off the escalator, Koons' big, multicolored flower sculpture is laid out at the public's feet — a fond welcome offering. Machined in stainless steel, these giant tulips, pristine and perfected, will never wilt, unlike nature's fragile kind.

They're beyond death. Koons flips the traditional role still-life flowers play, symbolizing mortality.

He further invokes the legendary tulip mania of 17th century Holland. The era also marks the art market's modern emergence. Paintings and tulip bulbs became mediums of fevered commercial exchange.

"Tulips" tells us something we don't always want to hear. The prospect of immortality, however vain, can be vested in precincts of incalculable wealth and extraordinary power. Like pyramids, say. Or the Broad.

The sculpture's witty placement underscores the narrowness of the collection. It's mainly rich in blue-chip art, defined by market value decided through consistent years of sales and confirmed at auction.

The market, subject to commercial limitations, is hardly infallible. It leaves a lot out. That's why the show's "sweep" feels choppy, and why about 80% of the 92 artists featured in the collection's new catalog are male, which the art market favors.

It's also why the show stresses art from New York and Europe, where art's primary trading floors are located, but not Los Angeles, where the collection was assembled. Ironically, in "Tips for Artists Who Want to Sell," his cheeky 1966-68 sign painting, L.A.'s John Baldessari gives the sardonic lowdown. "Paintings with cows and hens collect dust," it declares, "while bulls and roosters sell."

Markets always distinguish between what's salable and what's not, but they can't calculate quality.
Thanks for the post, Old Man.

My wife and I attended the last show ever at the old Whitney Museum in NYC last year, and it was a major Koons exhibit.

I have often struggled with Koons, and often think of his work as kitsch.

I did gain some appreciation of his work as I do most of the time when viewing a major exhibition, but still not too sold overall. I did find his pornographic series more interesting than I expected and listening to the comments in the Adult Only room very funny.

Speaking of pornographic, I read today that feminist filmmaker Candida Royalle died this weekend.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Thanks for the post, Old Man.

My wife and I attended the last show ever at the old Whitney Museum in NYC last year, and it was a major Koons exhibit.

I have often struggled with Koons, and often think of his work as kitsch.

I have the same feeling for Koons, but my daughter of course likes him. I did, however, like this unrealized piece that I thought was just for LACMA. Steam Locomotive

Better use of the money than Levitated Mass.
Last edited by The Old Man
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I have often struggled with Koons, and often think of his work as kitsch.

While I am not a fan of kitsch I do appreciate many of Koons' works.


Do you prefer Koons or Hirst, in general?

I, personally, appreciate more of Koons' works.
I cannot get my head around Hirst at all. His pieces do not inspire any real emotion in me which is critical. No emotion = not true art (for me)
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
The only Koons work I really enjoy is his BMW art car. Of course there are better Art Cars (the first four Calder, Stella, Lichenstein and Warhol) but...

While I would never ache for any of either of their works, Hirst does speak to me more.


Rob, have you ever visited the BMW Art Car exhibit? It is wonderful.

I'm in complete agreement with the Koons v Hirst debate. I can/will live very well without either, but if pushed, Hirst.

My wife and I stayed at the Ritz in Dublin ( Powerscourt) and they own several Hirst works, including his Spin series which I liked. Did not love, but liked. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
The only Koons work I really enjoy is his BMW art car. Of course there are better Art Cars (the first four Calder, Stella, Lichenstein and Warhol) but...

While I would never ache for any of either of their works, Hirst does speak to me more.


Rob, have you ever visited the BMW Art Car exhibit? It is wonderful.

I'm in complete agreement with the Koons v Hirst debate. I can/will live very well without either, but if pushed, Hirst.

My wife and I stayed at the Ritz in Dublin ( Powerscourt) and they own several Hirst works, including his Spin series which I liked. Did not love, but liked. Wink

Well the Broad will be Koon/Hirst Central.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
The only Koons work I really enjoy is his BMW art car. Of course there are better Art Cars (the first four Calder, Stella, Lichenstein and Warhol) but...

While I would never ache for any of either of their works, Hirst does speak to me more.


Rob, have you ever visited the BMW Art Car exhibit? It is wonderful.

I'm in complete agreement with the Koons v Hirst debate. I can/will live very well without either, but if pushed, Hirst.

My wife and I stayed at the Ritz in Dublin ( Powerscourt) and they own several Hirst works, including his Spin series which I liked. Did not love, but liked. Wink

Well the Broad will be Koon/Hirst Central.


I'm curious to see the architecture of the California and Michigan new museums.

I'm in California most years, but just never have any reason to head to Michigan. I was in Michigan for business several times a year in the 80's - late '90's, but all the companies left the state.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Eli Broad, "Contemporary art is the art of our time."

Isn't this from the Department of Redundancy Department?

.


Old Man, my guess as Broad rarely if ever misspeaks about art.

I also would say contemporary art is the art of today. I don't think that has been the case until the last 10-15 years, maybe 20 at the most. (?) While there has/will be always been contemporary art, I would suggest it has only recently become the darling of the art collecting community recently in general. ( look at Art News top collectors edition) I think there are reasons for this.

When D and I started collecting art seriously about 25-30 years ago we focused on Modern art, ( 1906-1956) AE, NY School, expressionist and some Pop. As baby boomers started aging and acquiring more art, the world became flat (BRIC) and the internet changed art collecting like nothing before the market for many genres just dried up and what was available became too expensive for the vast majority. Steve Martin's book An Object of Beauty makes this case in spades. As you know, Martin is a very serious collector and even at his level it has changed what he collects. When Marc Chagall died in 1985 one could still buy a nice while not museum quality work of his for under $7500 as we did. This for many reasons is just not the case anymore.

Our very modest collection of 150+ works is now over 70% contemporary I would guess, maybe more. I will share a story from Martin's book and as you may know, Martin refers to actual art collectors in his book. While an art enthusiast is viewing a massive collection of modern and contemporary art in a mansion on Long Island he is asked why this genre is his favorite? The man replies his favorite is not modern or contemporary but High Renaissance. When asked then why do you collect modern and contemporary he replies because he can fill his home with art that he enjoys buying the finest modern and contemporary art, but if he collected art from the High Renaissance he would only have one or two works of art to enjoy. While everyone has different amounts they spend on art, I think this is the case for all of us that art is their passion.

Thus, I also think contemporary art is the art of today, and now even museums are focusing on it thanks to people like Broad and others. Cool
I read about an emerging artist in the New York Times a couple of years ago, and we went to see his work at the Bernstein Gallery in NYC. His name is Peter Demos.

I have been tracking his career ever since and decided to pull the trigger this past weekend and bought two of his works.

As always, now the problem... What must go into storage to create new space. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
I read about an emerging artist in the New York Times a couple of years ago, and we went to see his work at the Bernstein Gallery in NYC. His name is Peter Demos.

I have been tracking his career ever since and decided to pull the trigger this past weekend and bought two of his works.

As always, now the problem... What must go into storage to create new space. Cool


interesting, his work has me feeling very reminiscient of

https://www.kleientertainment..../gallery/concept-art

very cool stuff
Anyone going to this upcoming exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art? Should be a good one. We will be in Cleveland for a day and thinking of attending.

Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse



Sun, 10/11/2015 to Tue, 01/05/2016

The Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Hall and Gallery



The Cleveland Museum of Art and the Royal Academy of Arts in London are organizing an innovative exhibition that examines the role of gardens in the paintings of Claude Monet and his contemporaries. Arguably the most important painter of gardens in the history of art, Monet was also an avid horticulturist who cultivated gardens wherever he lived. As early as the 1860s, a symbiotic relationship developed between his activities as a horticulturist and his paintings of gardens, a relationship that can be traced from his early years in Sainte-Adresse to his final months at Giverny. “I perhaps owe it to flowers,” he wrote, “that I became a painter.”

While Monet remains the touchstone, the exhibition also looks broadly and deeply at the garden theme in modern art through the inclusion of paintings by other Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, and avant-garde artists of the early 20th century. The exhibition will lead visitors through the evolution of the garden theme, from Impressionist visions of light and atmosphere to retreats for reverie and dreams, sites for bold experimentation, sanctuaries of refuge and healing, and, ultimately, signifiers of a world restored to order—a paradise regained. Framing these paintings in the context of broad artistic movements, as well as social and political events, will offer unprecedented paths for understanding the garden as a multifaceted, universal theme in modern art.

Painting the Modern Garden: Monet to Matisse is organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Royal Academy of Arts in London.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
Well I'll be camped out at the Art Gallery of Ontario for the month of November as the JMW Turner exhibition opens at the end of the month.

Over 50 paintings on loan from the Tate.

See you there. Cool
I thought it was strange that they'd have another Turner exhibition so soon after the last one. Then I looked it up: the last one was in 2004. Time flies.
Turner was overlooked and somewhat controversial during his life. He was a wealthy man from birth and perhaps never played the game well. I know he took a lot of flak for his watercolor paintings which I thought was silly.

He was a great printmaker for sure. The DMA had well over 100 of his works for a major exhibition a few years ago. It was a very special exhibition and I think he is still a little overlooked in many ways.

Gents, enjoy this true artist!