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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by wine+artBig GrinD, if you enjoy Magritte, check out Giorgio de Chirico.


Grew up with this:

The Philosopher's Conquest


You never shared with me that your parents owned this.

Oh, no...going to the Art Institute. For some reason we did have a copy of this codpiece masterpiece... Wedding Dance

Interesting enough we had an expurgated version.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
To my good wine friend, DD and his continuing education about art.

Jim Dine ( great Neo - Dada artist) is gifting several hundred prints to some lowbrow museum this month... the London's British Museum. Cool

Ha! It's not the Louvre. Wink j/k - haven't been there or in Paris or London, for that matter.
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
London's British Museum. Cool


Is there another British Museum somewhere? Big Grin

Going to town on Saturday, and hope to talk the girls into seeing a Daumier exhibit at the Royal Academy...I think he is under appreciated and prescient, esp. his Don Quixote studies.


Well, the museum does not have to be in London... the U.K. is pretty large. Wink

Jabe,

Have you been to the Serpentine Sackler this year to see Zaha Hadid's architectural work?
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Originally posted by wine+art:


Have you been to the Serpentine Sackler this year to see Zaha Hadid's architectural work?


I have not, but thanks for the tip. I wanted to see a passed Bauhaus exhibit at the Barbican, but we just never made it...

London is out tomorrow, as the week has just been too tough...a few 11-hour days, a kid on amoxicillin, Halloween party...going to put the new au paire on a bus to Cambridge tomorrow and kick it on the home front....but I WILL see the Daumier!
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
I'm not sure if this is breaking news here...huge haul of works in Munich...German police recover 1,500 modernist masterpieces 'looted by Nazis'

I wonder what will emerge. German police apparently kept the find secret for two years, over concerns of restitution, claims and diplomatic issues.

I sincerely wish the best to the ancestors of the true owners of these works and that they are able to successfully reclaim what is theirs. Be damned those that supported this blatant thievry.
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
I'm not sure if this is breaking news here...huge haul of works in Munich...German police recover 1,500 modernist masterpieces 'looted by Nazis'

I wonder what will emerge. German police apparently kept the find secret for two years, over concerns of restitution claims and diplomatic issues.


Wow!

This is going to be messy.

It boggles my mind how Nazism was able to rise even after reading books on the subject.

What an amazing find of art though.
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Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
I'm not sure if this is breaking news here...huge haul of works in Munich...German police recover 1,500 modernist masterpieces 'looted by Nazis'

I wonder what will emerge. German police apparently kept the find secret for two years, over concerns of restitution, claims and diplomatic issues.

I sincerely wish the best to the ancestors of the true owners of these works and that they are able to successfully reclaim what is theirs. Be damned those that supported this blatant thievry.


+1.

Not only what was stolen by these thugs, but so many pieces were burned being tagged as degenerate art that can never be returned to their owner or their family.

The Swiss are dirty in all this cover-up as well.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
I'm not sure if this is breaking news here...huge haul of works in Munich...German police recover 1,500 modernist masterpieces 'looted by Nazis'

I wonder what will emerge. German police apparently kept the find secret for two years, over concerns of restitution, claims and diplomatic issues.

I sincerely wish the best to the ancestors of the true owners of these works and that they are able to successfully reclaim what is theirs. Be damned those that supported this blatant thievery.


First, I think you mean the descendants of the art owners, not the ancestors. But, in any event, the thievery of art and other belongings was so rampant, together with physical and other horrors.

It is incredibly difficult for the descendants to document the ownership of this art. We're talking alot of years ago. My grandparents were pretty well off in Vienna, but I have no idea if they had any significant art. When they came to the US, all my grandfather was able to escape with was his violin, his viola, and sheet music. And, his pride. My grandmother had baked a cake into which she put her wedding ring, so that survived, along with 6 spoons. That was it.

Just don't let anyone tell you that the average German person had no idea what was happening.
They knew. For sure.
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Originally posted by DoubleD:
Would this present an ethical dilemma for private collectors and museums if all of the sudden there are works of art that are appearing in the market? Is provenance something that buyers are always concerned about?


I would imagine it is going to be very difficult to determine who is rightful owner of many of these artworks. I hope there are ways for the public to see the art while they find the rightful owners.
Are we seeing an appetite change in the art world? Far too soon to know, and tomorrow night followed by an auction next week may just shed some light on a potential trend change.

While Giacometti did cover the reserve (barely) many others did not, including a Picasso and shockingly even a Modigliani. Both received $20M bids, but both failed to meet the set reserves. This coupled with a Kandinsky blowing the reserve out of the water by $7M+ is worthy of watching in my opinion.

Aberration or tipping point? We will have much more data by the end of next week.
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Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
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Originally posted by DoubleD:
Would this present an ethical dilemma for private collectors and museums if all of the sudden there are works of art that are appearing in the market? Is provenance something that buyers are always concerned about?


I would imagine it is going to be very difficult to determine who is rightful owner of many of these artworks. I hope there are ways for the public to see the art while they find the rightful owners.

Although I'm not sure the best way to handle the distribution of the art works, a good place for it to be placed in the interim would be something like the Holocaust Museums in DC, LA, etc.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
Each to their own and all...but I have to admit that Bacon triptych of Freud does less than nothing for me.

Oh the things I could do with $142.4mln.


Ha. The things you could do with the $15.4m buyers premium. Wink

I thought $100m, but this caught a number of people by surprise.


I read Gagosian went to $101mln and Hong Gyu Shin went to $87mln.

Also of interest Koon's Orange Balloon Dog went for $58.4mln (high estimate was $55mln) to a telephone bidder. That's the highest price for a living artist now I believe.

Oh and going through $15.4mln would be fairly easy. Smile Pay off the mortgage in Chicago and Toronto, nice little reno/extension at the cottage, find a good building lot within 5 miles of where we are now and build a house (quite frankly if I’m blowing the money I’ve always wanted a Shope Reno Wharton house. They could redo the cottage as well), new 911 Turbo S and an Evanta Aston Martin DB4 Zegato recreation, replace our MB wagon with a new E63S wagon, 100 cases of wine or so, an FP Journe Octa in Platnium and a Patek 3738 & 5164, a couple of Hermes bags for my wife along a new pair of diamond studs, go to Poole for a few suits, G&G for some shoes and furnish the new house, and well by then all of that money is probably gone…

Now $140+ million,that would take a serious undertaking to blow! Devilish I'm sure I would be up for the task.
Last edited by robsutherland
I feel a tinge of pride around the Koon's sculpture.

Two years ago I came across small reproductions of the "Balloon Dog" at a local home furnishings shop. They had a light purple one, and an orange one. I thought they were great, and purchased the pair for my wife.

They were produced in limited numbers, but as I understand it, it was an open edition in the sense that they weren't "numbered".

Fast-forward almost 2 years, and I see the original "Balloon Dog" in a WSJ article with an auction estimate of $45M. Mind you, the original is 10-feet tall, and mine are 10 inches tall, but I can't help but feel a little pride knowing a chose a sculpture simply because I enjoyed it - having no idea who the artist was, and what the original would soon sell for.
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Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
I feel a tinge of pride around the Koon's sculpture.

Two years ago I came across small reproductions of the "Balloon Dog" at a local home furnishings shop. They had a light purple one, and an orange one. I thought they were great, and purchased the pair for my wife.

They were produced in limited numbers, but as I understand it, it was an open edition in the sense that they weren't "numbered".

Fast-forward almost 2 years, and I see the original "Balloon Dog" in a WSJ article with an auction estimate of $45M. Mind you, the original is 10-feet tall, and mine are 10 inches tall, but I can't help but feel a little pride knowing a chose a sculpture simply because I enjoyed it - having no idea who the artist was, and what the original would soon sell for.

My old snotty persona would have had something negative to say here.
Elements of my life converged. I am an unabashed fan of pre-1980 Playboy magazine. I am particularly fond of the early 60s to early 70s--yes my formative years. I used to buy them in the mid-60s in a downtown Chicago subway station when I was 13 and started subscribing when I was 14. Somewhere else I will give the details of why I think this magazine was so important--yes I used to read it cover to cover.

Anyway as a fan I picked up the now out of print digital version of the 1950s and 1960s. In the January 1962 issue there was an article entitled, The Fine Art of Acquiring Fine Art. I can email anyone a pdf copy if you'd like.

Earlier this week I was mailed a copy of the best free magazine around--Taschen's magazine and catalog. It comes out quarterly and is a must get. And low and behold (whatever that means) there was this article to promote a new book on Playboy: What if...you had followed Playboy's art buying advice from 1962?.

A fun article.
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Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
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Originally posted by The Old Man:

My old snotty persona would have had something negative to say here.


Criticism is always welcome. I've just recently become interested in the "art world".

Now, negative comments for the sake of being negative... well, I don't need to tell you where you can shove that Wink

Indeed.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
Elements of my life converged. I am an unabashed fan of pre-1980 Playboy magazine. I am particularly fond of the early 60s to early 70s--yes my formative years. I used to buy them in the mid-60s in a downtown Chicago subway station when I was 13 and started subscribing when I was 14. Somewhere else I will give the details of why I think this magazine was so important--yes I used to read it cover to cover.

Anyway as a fan I picked up the now out of print digital version of the 1950s and 1960s. In the January 1962 issue there was an article entitled, The Fine Art of Acquiring Fine Art. I can email anyone a pdf copy if you'd like.

Earlier this week I was mailed a copy of the best free magazine around--Taschen's magazine and catalog. It comes out quarterly and is a must get. And low and behold (whatever that means) there was this article to promote a new book on Playboy: What if...you had followed Playboy's art buying advice from 1962?.

A fun article.


Wow!! That was a blast!

Thanks for sharing.
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Elements of my life converged. I am an unabashed fan of pre-1980 Playboy magazine. I am particularly fond of the early 60s to early 70s--yes my formative years. I used to buy them in the mid-60s in a downtown Chicago subway station when I was 13 and started subscribing when I was 14. Somewhere else I will give the details of why I think this magazine was so important--yes I used to read it cover to cover.

Anyway as a fan I picked up the now out of print digital version of the 1950s and 1960s. In the January 1962 issue there was an article entitled, The Fine Art of Acquiring Fine Art. I can email anyone a pdf copy if you'd like.

Earlier this week I was mailed a copy of the best free magazine around--Taschen's magazine and catalog. It comes out quarterly and is a must get. And low and behold (whatever that means) there was this article to promote a new book on Playboy: What if...you had followed Playboy's art buying advice from 1962?.

A fun article.


Wow!! That was a blast!

Thanks for sharing.


Very very cool, Old Man.

America was just discovering art in many ways still in the 50's - 60's, and it was not until after WWII that America became the center of the art world. Up until the 20th century fine art owned by Americans was mostly European, and only owned by the very well - heeled.

If one looks at the three big auctions last week alone, it is amazing how much influence Peggy Guggenheim and Clement Greenberg had and even have to this day.
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Originally posted by wine+art:Very very cool, Old Man.

America was just discovering art in many ways still in the 50's - 60's, and it was not until after WWII that America became the center of the art world. Up until the 20th century fine art owned by Americans was mostly European, and only owned by the very well - heeled.

If one looks at the three big auctions last week alone, it is amazing how much influence Peggy Guggenheim and Clement Greenberg had and even have to this day.

I also love this 17 minute film used to train Sear's employees in the art of selling art:

The Vincent Price Collection of Fine Art

You'd be surprise at some of the original art Sears was selling.
I went to the Menil Collection in Houston yesterday for the first time and really enjoyed it. They had a very interesting selection of modern art along with some ancient art. In addition they had a quite large retrospective of Wols and a showing of Luc Tuymans art. I was quite taken by Tuymans work, very interesting and different. He used oils, but the appearance had almost a chalky look to it.

I also visited the Rothko chapel, and maybe it was because of the overcast weather, but it really didn't do a lot for me.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I had a chance for a pre-screening of the Hopper exhibit at the DMA that just opened.

Hopper was an excellent painter, printmaker and etcher. His works always make me think of words that would describe him as a person, sophisticated, smart, frank, lonely, detached, demure, isolated, withdrawn and serious.


I know he's best known for his works like "Nighthawks", "Chop Suey" and "Office in a Small City", and they are all wonderful works but its his landscapes which have always tugged at my heart.

If you could give me ANY painting in the world, "Corn Hill" and ESPECIALLY "The Lee Shore" would be in the top 4-6.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
it is amazing how much influence Peggy Guggenheim and Clement Greenberg had and even have to this day.
I know very little to comment here, but I feel compelled to show some love to these two. I would also show some love to Harold Rosenberg. Wow! Influence is probably an understatement. On a personal level, my heart lies in almost a 50 year period from 1900-1950. It's certainly not to show an absence of appreciation outside this timeframe. This was just such a special time in my opinion for ART! And with all due respect, when it comes to casting a shadow of influence, or in this case a total eclipse on the artworld and how artists themselves would evolve and "express", the work of Picasso is nothing less than paramount.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:


If you could give me ANY painting in the world, "Corn Hill" and ESPECIALLY "The Lee Shore" would be in the top 4-6.


Ah, what a great potential question. Wink


Off the top of my head and in order:

1)Turner – The Fighting Temeraire
2)Pissarro – Montmatre - Morning, Grey Weather (Though I would take ANY of them)
3)Homer – Sponge Fishermen
4)Hopper – The Lee Shore
5)Pissarro – Avenue l’Opera - Morning Sunshine (Though I would take ANY of them)
6)Manet – Serving Girl
7)Hopper – Corn Hill
8)Sargent - Gassed
9)Homer – Banana Tree (Nassau)
10)Bingham – Fur Traders Descending the Missouri

Though you could of course add dozens. It's hard not to add Rousseau's Surprised!, something by Botero, a Heade Thunderstorm, Klee Vast or Highways & Byways, Rivera's The Flower Vendor, a Monet parliament etc.....
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Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:


If you could give me ANY painting in the world, "Corn Hill" and ESPECIALLY "The Lee Shore" would be in the top 4-6.


Ah, what a great potential question. Wink


Off the top of my head and in order:

1)Turner – The Fighting Temeraire
2)Pissarro – Montmatre - Morning, Grey Weather (Though I would take ANY of them)
3)Homer – Sponge Fishermen
4)Hopper – The Lee Shore
5)Pissarro – Avenue l’Opera - Morning Sunshine (Though I would take ANY of them)
6)Manet – Serving Girl
7)Hopper – Corn Hill
8)Sargent - Gassed
9)Homer – Banana Tree (Nassau)
10)Bingham – Fur Traders Descending the Missouri

Though you could of course add dozens. It's hard not to add Rousseau's Surprised!, something by Botero, a Heade Thunderstorm, Klee Vast or Highways & Byways, Rivera's The Flower Vendor, a Monet parliament etc.....


Well played, Rob.
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Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
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Originally posted by wine+art:

You know that would never happen, though I wish I was. ( we are iced in) I was only saluting the start of such a grand event.


I feel your pain... I had to leave my shirt sleeves rolled down today. It wasn't so much the 76F temps, but the wind chill that got me...

Winter man, I tell ya'...


LOL that made me laugh - despite the -6 windchill here this morning.
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Originally posted by Italian Wino:
W+A

It will be mine eventually. Currently my father is enjoying it on the wall in his dining room. If you find yourself in Rochester, NY you will have to get together and share some vino and talk about art with my dad.

IW


IW, very nice.

I would love to share an evening with your dad someday. I thought about going to the PGA but not an easy place to get to. Wink
We had a niece and nephew in laws in town for a bit. They toured around the UK, spending most of their time seeing the insides of pubs and subsequently sleeping it off. During some down time, they asked us to show them around some museums. Thusly, toured some highlights of the British Museum, and a great look at the National Gallery (such an amazing museum...there is so much to appreciate, I never tire of the place).

A highlight for me, however, was a revisit to the Courtauld Gallery. I love this small but powerhouse of a museum.
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Originally posted by VinT:
Ended the year with a few pleasurable hours at AGO taking in The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918. Favorite work today was The Yellow Cow by Franz Marc.


Nice to see Marc mentioned. He is an artist that has been under the radar the past several decades for some reason.

I'm a fan of German expressionism and Marc was the founder of Der Blaue Reiter as well. Thanks for sharing.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Nice to see Marc mentioned. He is an artist that has been under the radar the past several decades for some reason.

I'm a fan of German expressionism and Marc was the founder of Der Blaue Reiter as well. Thanks for sharing.

In this selection of works, I actually preferred Marc's pieces to those of his Blue Rider co-founder Kandinsky. I can't help but wonder how spectacular Marc's artistic life might have been had it not been cut tragically short while fighting in WWI.
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Originally posted by VinT:
I can't help but wonder how spectacular Marc's artistic life might have been had it not been cut tragically short while fighting in WWI.

Another prolific artist of the period of Expressionism, who died at the young age of 28, was Egon Schiele. Well worth acquainting yourself with this artist (and his work) if you have not already (IMHO).
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Originally posted by KSC02:
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Originally posted by VinT:
I can't help but wonder how spectacular Marc's artistic life might have been had it not been cut tragically short while fighting in WWI.

Another prolific artist of the period of Expressionism, who died at the young age of 28, was Egon Schiele. Well worth acquainting yourself with this artist (and his work) if you have not already (IMHO).


Well, if we are talking German Expressionism, I must mention Kirchner, Macke, Nolde, Beckman, Dix and Grosz as well. Cool

German Expressionism had a major impact on cinema as well. I'm thinking Old Man is having a slow day, so I will wait to see if he will post on this topic before jumping in. Wink
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Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
I can't help but wonder how spectacular Marc's artistic life might have been had it not been cut tragically short while fighting in WWI.

Another prolific artist of the period of Expressionism, who died at the young age of 28, was Egon Schiele. Well worth acquainting yourself with this artist (and his work) if you have not already (IMHO).


Well, if we are talking German Expressionism, I must mention Kirchner, Macke, Nolde, Beckman, Dix and Grosz as well. Cool

German Expressionism had a major impact on cinema as well. I'm thinking Old Man is having a slow day, so I will wait to see if he will post on this topic before jumping in. Wink

First, the Rifkind Center at LACMA has a remarkable collection of German Expressionism highlighted by over 7,000 works on paper. In film my favorite two works, and certainly the most famous, are The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Nosferatu. Both are typical of the great German silent era with their sharp off-kilter sets and high contrast lighting. Hitchcock was always a fan of the director of the later work--F. W. Murnau. Interesting that Murnau also directed the extremely sad The Last Laugh with the great Emil Jennings.

Now I must riff: Emil Jennings other well known movie is The Blue Angel co-staring Marlene Dietrich. Dietrich was already 29 when she became a star in her first talking movie. She'd already appeared in 19 (!) silent movies. In this film she sang, for the first time, her signature song, Falling In Love Again. The film was directed by Josef Von Sternberg who became Dietrich's mentor in Hollywood and they made six more films together.

Sternberg commissioned one of the two great Austrian born, immigrants to Los Angeles architects--Richard Neutra (whose Lovell city house is in L.A. Confidential) to build the Von Sternberg House in 1935. An apocryphal story that Neutra told was that the bathroom doors were not to have locks to prevent high-strung actors and actresses of the day from locking themselves in and committing suicide. Later Ayn Rand lived there and it later it was knocked down, for a development in 1972.

Let's continue the connections: Neutra, when he lived in the old country, worked for the architect Erich Mendelsohn of Germany. In the early twenties Mendelsohn designed Einstein Tower a solar telescope observatory. Mendelsohn's work is often said to reflect German Expressionist ideals and this building his best example of that style. However that title may go to the Second Goetheanum by Rudolf Steiner.

Back jump: Von Sternberg is buried in the tiny Westwood Memorial Cemetery behind tall office buildings on Wilshire. Marilyn Monroe is buried there as is her star from Some Like It Hot Jack Lemmon. And nearby our beloved director of same, and many other great movies, Billy Wilder. I was visiting again Saturday and was amused by Rodney Dangerfield's tombstone with the quote, "There's goes the neighborhood."
Last edited by The Old Man
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
I can't help but wonder how spectacular Marc's artistic life might have been had it not been cut tragically short while fighting in WWI.

Another prolific artist of the period of Expressionism, who died at the young age of 28, was Egon Schiele. Well worth acquainting yourself with this artist (and his work) if you have not already (IMHO).


Well, if we are talking German Expressionism, I must mention Kirchner, Macke, Nolde, Beckman, Dix and Grosz as well. Cool

German Expressionism had a major impact on cinema as well. I'm thinking Old Man is having a slow day, so I will wait to see if he will post on this topic before jumping in. Wink

First, the Rifkind Center at LACMA has a remarkable collection of German Expressionism highlighted by over 7,000 works on paper. In film my favorite two works, and certainly the most famous, are The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Nosferatu. Both are typical of the great German silent era with their sharp off-kilter sets and high contrast lighting. Hitchcock was always a fan of the director of the later work--F. W. Murnau. Interesting that Murnau also directed the extremely sad The Last Laugh with the great Emil Jennings.

Now I must riff: Emil Jennings other well known movie is The Blue Angel co-staring Marlene Dietrich. Dietrich was already 29 when she became a star in her first talking movie. She'd already appeared in 19 (!) silent movies. In this film she sang, for the first time, her signature song, Falling In Love Again. The film was directed by Josef Von Sternberg who became Dietrich's mentor in Hollywood and they made six more films together.

Sternberg commissioned one of the two great Austrian born, immigrants to Los Angeles architects--Richard Neutra (whose Lovell city house is in L.A. Confidential) to build the Von Sternberg House in 1935. An apocryphal story that Neutra told was that the bathroom doors were not to have locks to prevent high-strung actors and actresses of the day from locking themselves in and committing suicide. Later Ayn Rand lived there and it later it was knocked down, for a development in 1972.

Let's continue the connections: Neutra, when he lived in the old country, worked for the architect Erich Mendelsohn of Germany. In the early twenties Mendelsohn designed Einstein Tower a solar telescope observatory. Mendelsohn's work is often said to reflect German Expressionist ideals and this building his best example of that style. However that title may go to the Second Goetheanum by Rudolf Steiner.

Back jump: Von Sternberg is buried in the tiny Westwood Memorial Cemetery behind tall office buildings on Wilshire. Marilyn Monroe is buried there as is her star from Some Like It Hot Jack Lemmon. And nearby our beloved director of same, and many other great movies, Billy Wilder. I was visiting again Saturday and was amused by Rodney Dangerfield's tombstone with the quote, "There's goes the neighborhood."


Bow Big Grin
Very happy to find out that Richard Hudson, Mia Pearlman and especially Jaume Plensa are on the short list to do the art installation outside of the new office building under construction across the street from me. The space for it is up to 57x19 meters and it's a big budget so it should hopefully be a great piece though I struggle to think much can outclass the wonderful "Rising" by Zhang Huan that went up last year with the new Shangri-la hotel.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
Very happy to find out that Richard Hudson, Mia Pearlman and especially Jaume Plensa are on the short list to do the art installation outside of the new office building under construction across the street from me. The space for it is up to 57x19 meters and it's a big budget so it should hopefully be a great piece though I struggle to think much can outclass the wonderful "Rising" by Zhang Huan that went up last year with the new Shangri-la hotel.


Cool
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
Very happy to find out that Richard Hudson, Mia Pearlman and especially Jaume Plensa are on the short list to do the art installation outside of the new office building under construction across the street from me. The space for it is up to 57x19 meters and it's a big budget so it should hopefully be a great piece though I struggle to think much can outclass the wonderful "Rising" by Zhang Huan that went up last year with the new Shangri-la hotel.

As one who lives in a city with some of the worst public art, who also turned down a major Nancy Rubins, this piece of crap kitsch represents our best:
Kiss
I'm jealous.
I saw the Magritte exhibit at the MOMA yesterday. It was a pretty large collection of his works. Despite the crowds, it was a very worthwhile 2.5 hrs spent. I wish the narratives in the audio guide were a bit more in depth and more insightful about the use of recurring objects in his works. The exhibit ends today.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I saw the Magritte exhibit at the MOMA yesterday. It was a pretty large collection of his works. Despite the crowds, it was a very worthwhile 2.5 hrs spent. I wish the narratives in the audio guide were a bit more in depth and more insightful about the use of recurring objects in his works. The exhibit ends today.


Very nice, DD.

Are you a fan of Giorgio de Chirico by chance?
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Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Very nice, DD.

Are you a fan of Giorgio de Chirico by chance?

Unfortunately, I can't say I am only because I am not knowledgeable of the Surrealist artists outside of the well-known names. It's kinda like saying I only drink Silver Oak and Opus One. Smile


DD, de Chirico is well known. Not Dali, yet excellent.

If you enjoyed the surrealist from Belgium with the Bowler hat, look into de Chirico.

Magritte had great influence in the film industry as well, and you see such in films by Bertolucci, Luc Godard and others.

Rene also had great influence on the brilliant Miro.

I'm glad you enjoyed!
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Looks like they are motivated by pricing and making money more than acquiring art for art's sake

Mad A negative influence to an otherwise beautiful thing. Sure to f*** up the market for a while.

That said, there are many 'works of Art' and excellent artists that will remain off their radar.
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Looks like they are motivated by pricing and making money more than acquiring art for art's sake

Mad A negative influence to an otherwise beautiful thing. Sure to f*** up the market for a while.

That said, there are many 'works of Art' and excellent artists that will remain off their radar.


A slippery slope for sure.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:

I'm still praying for a fire.


Having visited this collection with you in its proper/intended setting, and understanding the travesty involved in the relocation, I have always been curious about your strong feelings regarding this.

Would you truly wish these works destroyed?

PH


Completely and totally.

There is not a fiber of my soul that does not believe Dr. Barnes would not do it himself if able before allowing this to happen. The works were his, and his alone.

I have read much about Dr. Barnes, and this is his worse nightmare. To hell with the thieves.
quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
Just acquired a very colorful 1951 Proof lithograph (Madame de Pompadour) from Matisse and trying to figure out the best place to hang it. Anyone else a fan of Matisse's litho's?

IW


IW, well played and thanks for the text photo!

A place to hang... the picture will give you something new and different each time you relocate it over the decades to come. Enjoy your new work of art from the second greatest artist of the 20th century. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
We will be in Miami in a few weeks, but sadly only for a few short days. Any must-see gallery recommendations?


Vin, Jorge will offer better insight than I will, but here are a few thoughts.

Miami continues to emerge as a serious art market with a true sense of edginess I enjoy. The Design District / Wynwood area has a few I enjoyed and even bought from. Several galleries are artist owned.

Castillo Gallery
Snitzer Gallery
Mitrani ( photography)
Wynwood Walls
Spinello ( can be very provocative depending on who is exhibiting)
Avant Gallery ( safe option in most cases)

As I said, Vin, Jorge will offer more insightful options.

Enjoy your time away from the brutal winter and buy something! Cool
VinT, I just stumbled upon this.

Email me, jorge at artisanmg dot com

w+a's recommendations are solid.

If you can get into town on Saturday, March 8th, you'll be here for our monthly art walk "Second Saturdays". This isn't some cheesy fufu art show, it's a really fun party-style night out with a bunch of open galleries, displays, artists-in-action, etc. for blocks and blocks. Very cool night out, my wife and I try to make it every month.

More importantly, the PAMM just opened last December, and it's stunning. Not to mention, the restaurant in the museum, Verde, is fantastic (Stephen Starr restaurant). The museum is a must visit, IMO.

Shoot me a note with where you're staying, who you're traveling with (wife, kids, friends, etc), and what you're into. I'll give you some suggestions.
Last edited by jorgerunfast
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
VinT, I just stumbled upon this.

Email me, jorge at artisanmg dot com

w+a's recommendations are solid.

If you can get into town on Saturday, March 8th, you'll be here for our monthly art walk "Second Saturdays". This isn't some cheesy fufu art show, it's a really fun party-style night out with a bunch of open galleries, displays, artists-in-action, etc. for blocks and blocks. Very cool night out, my wife and I try to make it every month.

More importantly, the PAMM just opened last December, and it's stunning. Not to mention, the restaurant in the museum, Verde, is fantastic (Stephen Starr restaurant). The museum is a must visit, IMO.

Shoot me a note with where you're staying, who you're traveling with (wife, kids, friends, etc), and what you're into. I'll give you some suggestions.

Sent. Thanks, Jorge!
We are both back in Dallas and a wonderful day and week ahead with highs in the 70's and sunny.

Today and tomorrow we will be enjoying the weather and The Nasher XCHANGE. This is a celebration of The Nasher being open for 10 years now. Ten artist were commissioned to create ten public art/sculptures works that were embedded withing the city, some where one might expect to find a public sculpture, and others where one might never expect to find such.

Needless to say, we are looking forward to our discoveries. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
VinT, I just stumbled upon this.

Email me, jorge at artisanmg dot com

w+a's recommendations are solid.

If you can get into town on Saturday, March 8th, you'll be here for our monthly art walk "Second Saturdays". This isn't some cheesy fufu art show, it's a really fun party-style night out with a bunch of open galleries, displays, artists-in-action, etc. for blocks and blocks. Very cool night out, my wife and I try to make it every month.

More importantly, the PAMM just opened last December, and it's stunning. Not to mention, the restaurant in the museum, Verde, is fantastic (Stephen Starr restaurant). The museum is a must visit, IMO.

Shoot me a note with where you're staying, who you're traveling with (wife, kids, friends, etc), and what you're into. I'll give you some suggestions.

Sent. Thanks, Jorge!


Just replied. Let me know if it doesn't arrive for whatever reason.
The artist painted them on the street to spread art to the masses, not to be ripped out of the wall and sold to highest paying bidder at auction. Sure, if it is your property, I guess you can do whatever you like with it, regardless of whether or not it violates the spirit of the piece. The success of auctions like these proliferates this type of behaviour, not only from property owners, but anyone looking to make a quick buck. For example, there is a guy right now in NYC going around ripping down Invaders and selling them on Craigslist.

Why exactly would someone see this as a positive, short of having a large Banksy or other high profile artist's work on the side of a building they own?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our congress introduce a (new version) bill yesterday to bring a droit de suite like process to art in America like France.

I'll admit it--I had to look it up. Apparently California already had something like this since 1976. It was called the "California Resale Royalty Act." It was struck down in 2012 for complex legal reasons. Now it appears it my become federal law.

For better or for worse CA often leads the country. Ack
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our congress introduce a (new version) bill yesterday to bring a droit de suite like process to art in America like France.

I'll admit it--I had to look it up. Apparently California already had something like this since 1976. It was called the "California Resale Royalty Act." It was struck down in 2012 for complex legal reasons. Now it appears it my become federal law.

For better or for worse CA often leads the country. Ack


Total BS!
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
From business man to major LA art force:

Stanley Grinstein is dead at 86

My wife and I popped in there about 17 years ago and we were given a wonder tour for about 40 minutes. There were these 4 foot high Rauschenberg clear plastic window shade combines that we could have bought for about a thousand dollars. What are the worth now?!


Thanks for the post, Old Man.

Grinstein brought excellent art at affordable pricing to so many, and also helped L.A. become a wonderful and serious art market.

I'm sorry, you passed on anything from Rauschenberg? Razz
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Newly restored Pollack "Mural" and some Greenberg dust up.

Pollack's "Mural" at the Getty.


Thanks for sharing, Old Man.

Until this one piece of art, America was not seen as a serious art nation, yet this one piece started the tilt towards America becoming the art capital of the world that it is today.

This true breakthrough and seminal work is the most important American painting of all-time.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Newly restored Pollack "Mural" and some Greenberg dust up.

Pollack's "Mural" at the Getty.


Thanks for sharing, Old Man.

Until this one piece of art, America was not seen as a serious art nation, yet this one piece started the tilt towards America becoming the art capital of the world that it is today.

This true breakthrough and seminal work is the most important American painting of all-time.

Never seen. I will go.