Skip to main content

quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
W+A, do you have any experience with Lucie Beppler? German artist.


I do indeed. I think our piece is at our daughters house.

It is an etching that has a chalkboard look somewhat like some of Cy Twombly's works, yet I think it is on a heavy paper.

Are you a fan of Beppler?


Love her work. I really like Morellet's wire pieces which made me think of her.
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
My little gallery did its first Manhattan art fair on Mar 6-9.

Now I get why they're all the rage!
Expensive but worth it. Collectors come to you!

By the end of the week my voice was hoarse from all the hand selling I had done.

www.sevenartsgallery.com
we may be small but we move merch!


Congratulations, fcs. I hope you established a number of clients.

Dallas is having a serious art fair in a couple of weeks with a few of our favorite galleries ( and people too) coming to town.

One of my very favorite galleries will be bringing with them, Bacon Condo, Rauschenberg, Tamayo, Stella, Sultan, Ruscha, Dine, Kapoor, Motherwell, Lichtenstein and Morellet just to name a few.

I also have two wine dinners planed with the gallery owners I'm looking forward to. Wine + Art makes me a happy man! Cool

Congrats again.
All signs point to a visit to the Tate Modern on Sunday (i.e. days off, sitter)! We'll stroll through a good part of it, but any favourites you all recommend? I've been once, last year, to see the Lichtenstein exhibit, but we didn't see anything else. This time, we won't have our kids with us, so it will be a little more leisurely. TIA!
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11: We'll stroll through a good part of it, but any favourites you all recommend?

Weeping Woman

Yes, thanks. We happened to see this at the Tate Britain a couple of years ago....some sort of 'Picasso and his influence on British Artists' exhibit. Nude woman in a red armchair was also there.

LACMA created an exhibit around this painting when it was on loan there. I saw it in the evening when there was hardly anyone there and I was able to just stand in front of it alone. One of the art viewing highlights of my life.
Jabe, the photo you emailed me of your daughter really touched my heart, sincerely. It took me back to how we took our children to the finest museums, performing arts and book fairs all round the world from the time they were 5. (?)

They both grew to love and cherish the arts and letters. One walk through their homes and it would be obvious. I see the same in the future for your precious daughter.

Thank you for sharing.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Jabe, the photo you emailed me of your daughter really touched my heart, sincerely. It took me back to how we took our children to the finest museums, performing arts and book fairs all round the world from the time they were 5. (?)

They both grew to love and cherish the arts and letters. One walk through their homes and it would be obvious. I see the same in the future for your precious daughter.

Thank you for sharing.


I certainly thought you'd approve. While we are not perfect parents, we are sure we are doing some things right!
Tate Modern....I certainly appreciated the breadth of the collection. Some highlights for me...room 1 on the 2nd floor, I could have just experienced this room and been done; an oil on canvas by Giacometti, as well as a few of his sculpture; another by Modrian (a sort of tree-like image unlike his later iconic style); cubist room; an 'organic' sculpture by Henry Moore.

Rothko is still an enigma to me. I continually feel frustrated viewing color fields from his mature stage....Maybe that was his intent. There were some smaller transitional pieces that gave me glimpses,but offered...hmmm, nothing profound to me.
The Rothko room at the Tate has 4 or 5 large canvases, all of them are combinations of red hues. I felt I gave it a good effort to try and understand; the room was not crowded and we sat and viewed for a time. The images to me visually appeared as windows...or open windows....looking out on stark fields. The paintings were full of sadness. Maybe this exacerbating my feelings of frustration.
The Dallas Art Fair held last week was the finest thus far. The event is an invitation only event for galleries from around the world. Two of the gallery owners are dear friends of ours and both reported strong sales ( above 7 figures) for their galleries and others as well.

My general impressions ...

The finest galleries overall were from London, NYC, Santa Fe, Melbourne, Berlin, Houston, Bogota and Milwaukee. (I excluded the DFW galleries as we know them too well)

The galleries from Seoul, Calgary, LA, Tokyo, Milan, Paris, San Francisco and Geneva were disappointing overall.

The private preview gala on Thursday night was pouring Ruinart BdB freely all night and Nespresso was offering espresso to all as well. The dinners each night were a little crazy but much fun as well.

Looking forward to next years already!
Went to the wonderful Calder exhibit today. Made even more interesting with the Frank Gehry designed installation. Unexpected shadows, little nooks with sculptures you can just relax and look at. Like seeing canvases with the painted shaped popped out and set in gentle motion. Excellent.

Then saw the truly overwhelming, and bizarre Diane Von Furstenberg: The Story of A Dress, also at LACMA. Two hundred mannequins essentially wearing one style of dress with different prints. Portraits, and other art works, featuring Furstenberg by artists from Warhol to Close. Stills from films showing Amy Adams in American Hustle wearing the dress and Cybil Shepard in Taxi Driver wearing another. Essentially Furstenberg designed a dress she would look good in and then sold it to the rest of the world.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by fcs:
W + A, what did you think of Julian's work?



fcs, walking out the door. Will write soon.


fcs, I enjoyed Julian's early work a great deal. He was in Houston early in his career and I saw a lot of his development. There was no surprise he became a major artist and Europe took him to a famous level.

I think he took his eye off the ball a little recently as he has been chasing other passions, but he does demand my attention nevertheless. He seems back, perhaps.
Hmmmm. I received an email this afternoon of an invoice ( paid) from a gallery we buy from for our records and the insurance company.

I called my wife who is in Santa Fe ( I'm in Dallas currently) to talk after I received the email, and she said nothing about buying a Joel Shapiro piece. I even called her back a few minutes later, and again nothing. Confused

Both of our birthday's are within the next week, so I guess she may have bought this as a gift, but I sure would feel better knowing for sure she did indeed buy the piece and nothing funny is going on. I can call the gallery, but would hate to spoil the surprise if that is her plan.

Hmmmm...
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
...I can call the gallery, but would hate to spoil the surprise if that is her plan.

Hmmmm...


The cat's already part way out of the bag, if D did pick this piece up. Make the call.

PH


Got into SF on Monday. I walk in to find the piece hanging. I ask D about it. She says she saw it, loved it, bought it and they came to the house to install it all in the same day. D says I just forgot to tell you... Big Grin

She then told me at dinner that night the gallery would be sending us the certified provenance papers and bill of sale for insurance riders. I did not bother to tell her I received all that the day she bought it. Wink
Renzo Piano is certainly a world class architect, but he's done LA no favors. First came the awful Broad Contemporary Art Museum addition to LACMA. That was followed up by another red hulk of a building, Reznick Pavilion addition a stone throw from the Broad. And now is this proposed adaptaive reuse of the next door neighbor Streamline Moderne May Company building. LA architect Zoltan Pali, who was working with Piano on the project resigned about two weeks ago.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Museum Building
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Renzo Piano is certainly a world class architect, but he's done LA no favors. First came the awful Broad Contemporary Art Museum addition to LACMA. That was followed up by another red hulk of a building, Reznick Pavilion addition a stone throw from the Broad. And now is this proposed adaptaive reuse of the next door neighbor Streamline Moderne May Company building. LA architect Zoltan Pali, who was working with Piano on the project resigned about two weeks ago.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Museum Building


I'm a huge fan of Piano, huge.

From the attachment you are showing, I would never have guessed Renzo.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Renzo Piano is certainly a world class architect, but he's done LA no favors. First came the awful Broad Contemporary Art Museum addition to LACMA. That was followed up by another red hulk of a building, Reznick Pavilion addition a stone throw from the Broad. And now is this proposed adaptaive reuse of the next door neighbor Streamline Moderne May Company building. LA architect Zoltan Pali, who was working with Piano on the project resigned about two weeks ago.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Museum Building


I'm a huge fan of Piano, huge.

From the attachment you are showing, I would never have guessed Renzo.

I thought you were (and for good reason.) Have you seen the two original additions he did at LACMA? Both are bad.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by The Old Man:
Renzo Piano is certainly a world class architect, but he's done LA no favors. First came the awful Broad Contemporary Art Museum addition to LACMA. That was followed up by another red hulk of a building, Reznick Pavilion addition a stone throw from the Broad. And now is this proposed adaptaive reuse of the next door neighbor Streamline Moderne May Company building. LA architect Zoltan Pali, who was working with Piano on the project resigned about two weeks ago.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Museum Building


I'm a huge fan of Piano, huge.

Have you seen the two original additions he did at LACMA? Both are bad.


I have not.
Our minimalist lifestyle in Santa Fe continues with a new acquisition of art.

The gallery ( and artist) came out today with 8 pieces to showcase works in the space we were interested in. We quickly selected two we knew would work, and selected one we are excited about.

As have said many many times, nothing in life that does not matter excites me more than quality art. Nothing. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our minimalist lifestyle in Santa Fe continues with a new acquisition of art.

The gallery ( and artist) came out today with 8 pieces to showcase works in the space we were interested in. We quickly selected two we knew would work, and selected one we are excited about.

As have said many many times, nothing in life that does not matter excites me more than quality art. Nothing. Cool

Nothing?

Something that excites me
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our minimalist lifestyle in Santa Fe continues with a new acquisition of art.

The gallery ( and artist) came out today with 8 pieces to showcase works in the space we were interested in. We quickly selected two we knew would work, and selected one we are excited about.


As have said many many times, nothing in life that does not matter excites me more than quality art. Nothing. Cool


Have you been to the Namingha gallery in Santa Fe? http://www.namingha.com/
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our minimalist lifestyle in Santa Fe continues with a new acquisition of art.

The gallery ( and artist) came out today with 8 pieces to showcase works in the space we were interested in. We quickly selected two we knew would work, and selected one we are excited about.


As have said many many times, nothing in life that does not matter excites me more than quality art. Nothing. Cool


Have you been to the Namingha gallery in Santa Fe? http://www.namingha.com/


Irwin, the gallery is less than a 10 minute walk from our home.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Our minimalist lifestyle in Santa Fe continues with a new acquisition of art.

The gallery ( and artist) came out today with 8 pieces to showcase works in the space we were interested in. We quickly selected two we knew would work, and selected one we are excited about.


As have said many many times, nothing in life that does not matter excites me more than quality art. Nothing. Cool


Have you been to the Namingha gallery in Santa Fe? http://www.namingha.com/


Irwin, the gallery is less than a 10 minute walk from our home.


What do you think of their work? We bought a piece when we were out there a number of years ago.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The top 5 of the night were, Newman, Bacon, Rothko, Warhol & Warhol. These 5 alone sold for more than $334M. Cool

Just to clarify, none of these 5 works were Modern or Contemporary pieces.

I'll bite.


OM, not sure I understand the comment. Are you asking about my comment about genre? If so...

Newman was a Color Field painter with Abstract Expressionism leanings. Bacon was a Surreal Figurative painter. I think of Rothko as an Abstract Expressionist with Color Field leanings, and then there is the King of Pop, the great Warhol.

Modern is truly from 1906-1956, and contemporary is just that. I understand the terms/genres are thrown around rather loosely, but it drives me nuts. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The top 5 of the night were, Newman, Bacon, Rothko, Warhol & Warhol. These 5 alone sold for more than $334M. Cool

Just to clarify, none of these 5 works were Modern or Contemporary pieces.

I'll bite.


OM, not sure I understand the comment. Are you asking about my comment about genre? If so...

Newman was a Color Field painter with Abstract Expressionism leanings. Bacon was a Surreal Figurative painter. I think of Rothko as an Abstract Expressionist with Color Field leanings, and then there is the King of Pop, the great Warhol.

Modern is truly from 1906-1956, and contemporary is just that. I understand the terms/genres are thrown around rather loosely, but it drives me nuts. Wink

But isn't for example, Pop Art a subset of Contemporary and Ab Exp a subset of Modern? And isn't there a general problem with the term Contemporary anyway? If Contemporary is of the time, then there will never be another major genre. Confused
OM, the lines are blurred for sure. Contemporary art is just that, art from the current generation without a true defended movement, thus devoid of a common philosophy.

Movements are well defined. Some last for only a short period like Impressionism ( thank goodness) and other movements are more major and long lasting, including serious influence on future art. Movements have a common philosophy.

Clear as mud? Big Grin

The Modern & Contemporary has become a too easy and lazy catchphrase that is just not accurate.
To: The Old Man,

I would love a pdf of the original copy of The Fine Art of Acquiring Fine Art. I've been looking for it for some time now. Let me know if the offer is still available to email a pdf! Thanks so much.

Judy

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Elements of my life converged. I am an unabashed fan of pre-1980 Playboy magazine. I am particularly fond of the early 60s to early 70s--yes my formative years. I used to buy them in the mid-60s in a downtown Chicago subway station when I was 13 and started subscribing when I was 14. Somewhere else I will give the details of why I think this magazine was so important--yes I used to read it cover to cover.

Anyway as a fan I picked up the now out of print digital version of the 1950s and 1960s. In the January 1962 issue there was an article entitled, The Fine Art of Acquiring Fine Art. I can email anyone a pdf copy if you'd like.

Earlier this week I was mailed a copy of the best free magazine around--Taschen's magazine and catalog. It comes out quarterly and is a must get. And low and behold (whatever that means) there was this article to promote a new book on Playboy: What if...you had followed Playboy's art buying advice from 1962?.

A fun article.
Sorry to be linking so many things, but I did find this article about 60% fascinating:

Art of the 1%

I will say I hate this whole 1% thing (which I'm thinking was the only meme that stuck from the ridiculous Occupy Movement.) But I like this quote at the top of the article:
quote:
When you’ve got the big house, and you’re driving a Jaguar, what differentiates you from every asshole dentist in the Valley? Art was a way for Eli to distinguish himself.
—Shelley De Angelus, Eli Broad’s former curator.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Sorry to be linking so many things, but I did find this article about 60% fascinating:

Art of the 1%

I will say I hate this whole 1% thing (which I'm thinking was the only meme that stuck from the ridiculous Occupy Movement.) But I like this quote at the top of the article:
quote:
When you’ve got the big house, and you’re driving a Jaguar, what differentiates you from every asshole dentist in the Valley? Art was a way for Eli to distinguish himself.
—Shelley De Angelus, Eli Broad’s former curator.


Thanks for the link I always love a good Walmart/Walton trashing article. It makes my day.
In my search for an anniversary gift I've discovered the 20th century Swedish pottery "scene" - Gustavsberg, Lindberg, Kage, etc. I picked up a nice Gustavsberg Argenta vase for the mrs. a couple weeks ago. She is of Swedish heritage so between that tie-in and my strange fondness of pottery I'm pretty excited and can see the collection growing over the years.
Just wanted to add that my wife LOVED her pottery gift when she opened it last night. Is it the height of art? Surely not, but the look on her face when she read the history and found out it was from Sweden was unforgettable. I had forgotten that on her Swedish side, her ancestors settled in Red Wing, MN when they came to the states and worked the pottery/clay mines including a tragic accident to her great (great) grandfather. We have one of the Red Wing cookie jars out on the counter. Many times when I buy her gifts of "art" sometimes it seems that I enjoy it more than she, that was not the case this time and it felt great. Thought I'd share.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Went down to the National Gallery of Art in Washington today. They have a very nice exhibit on Degas/Cassatt, and a few new Van Goghs they recently acquired, plus a Wyeth exhibit.
Fun time.



Irwin, thanks for the warning. Wink

I'm in your neck of the woods later this year, and will seek out other art. Big Grin


Razz

Say what you will, I love that art. Vivacious.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Went down to the National Gallery of Art in Washington today. They have a very nice exhibit on Degas/Cassatt, and a few new Van Goghs they recently acquired, plus a Wyeth exhibit.
Fun time.



Irwin, thanks for the warning. Wink

I'm in your neck of the woods later this year, and will seek out other art. Big Grin


I did get a Kandinsky tie!
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Went down to the National Gallery of Art in Washington today. They have a very nice exhibit on Degas/Cassatt, and a few new Van Goghs they recently acquired, plus a Wyeth exhibit.
Fun time.



Irwin, thanks for the warning. Wink

I'm in your neck of the woods later this year, and will seek out other art. Big Grin


I did get a Kandinsky tie!


Bow Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Went down to the National Gallery of Art in Washington today. They have a very nice exhibit on Degas/Cassatt, and a few new Van Goghs they recently acquired, plus a Wyeth exhibit.
Fun time.



Irwin, thanks for the warning. Wink

I'm in your neck of the woods later this year, and will seek out other art. Big Grin


Razz

Say what you will, I love that art. Vivacious.


Ha.... you and millions of others as well. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Went down to the National Gallery of Art in Washington today. They have a very nice exhibit on Degas/Cassatt, and a few new Van Goghs they recently acquired, plus a Wyeth exhibit.
Fun time.



Irwin, thanks for the warning. Wink

I'm in your neck of the woods later this year, and will seek out other art. Big Grin


Razz

Say what you will, I love that art. Vivacious.


Ha.... you and millions of others as well. Wink


I agree though, many love it to the exclusion of all else. Not healthy or terribly informed/thought out... It's certainly easy art to enjoy.
Just returned from a week in Rome. A greater love now for Caravaggio, Michelangelo, Rafael, & Bernini. all true masters. Caravaggio has been a growing favorite for a few years now. Seeing several of his works "live" has solidified his standing with me. I have considered what I've seen for several days now and two words keep coming up to to help me process his art: light & gravity. What a wonderful artist.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×