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quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
If you live close to Baltimore, there is an exhibit of Matisse and Diebenkorn at the Baltimore Museum of Art. I love Richard's work and wish I lived closer to Baltimore. While the two artists never met each other the influence that Matisse had on Richard's work is very obvious.


IW, the exhibit will be in San Francisco next. A viewing then off to the wine country might be in order. Wink

Diebenkorn was also heavily influenced by Hopper early in his career which is obvious in much of his work as well.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
If you live close to Baltimore, there is an exhibit of Matisse and Diebenkorn at the Baltimore Museum of Art. I love Richard's work and wish I lived closer to Baltimore. While the two artists never met each other the influence that Matisse had on Richard's work is very obvious.


IW, the exhibit will be in San Francisco next. A viewing then off to the wine country might be in order. Wink

Diebenkorn was also heavily influenced by Hopper early in his career which is obvious in much of his work as well.


I presume you saw the piece about this on Sunday Morning yesterday?
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
If you live close to Baltimore, there is an exhibit of Matisse and Diebenkorn at the Baltimore Museum of Art. I love Richard's work and wish I lived closer to Baltimore. While the two artists never met each other the influence that Matisse had on Richard's work is very obvious.


IW, the exhibit will be in San Francisco next. A viewing then off to the wine country might be in order. Wink

Diebenkorn was also heavily influenced by Hopper early in his career which is obvious in much of his work as well.


I presume you saw the piece about this on Sunday Morning yesterday?


I recorded the program but have yet to watch.
We went to the Picasso,Rivera exhibit at the LACMA yesterday...excellent, very nicely done.

Had fun with my kids in the John McLaughlin rooms, I asked them to each pick a painting, then tell me an idea or a feeling they get looking at it.

Found their lone Frida, and a portrait of her by Diego.

The LACMA is a world class art museum. We bought a yearly membership to motivate us to go again.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by Jabe11:


Found their lone Frida, and a portrait of her by Diego.



Only one Rivera and Kahlo? Frown


It's all about expectations. We weren't planning on seeing any Frida paintings. It was only when I realized the breadth and depth of the collection that I thought to search their online archive. So, yes, only one Frida, and we were quite excited to see this smallish, minor work. We are going to plan a trip to Mexico City one of these days, mainly to go to Casa Azul and the Dolores Olmedo.

Rivera, on the other had, was very well represented, maybe two dozen paintings, along with sketches, posters. In the exhibit, there were contemporary works by him and Pablo side by side, in similar styles, sometimes even the same year, punctuated by indigenous Meso-American art/artifacts.

Diego's portrait of Frida was not included in the exhibit, but left in the Art of the Americas building, along with several other of his works. There was a new artist I was turned into in this building, Rufino Tamayo.

The Diego/Rivera exhibit is on til May....you should go if your going to be in SoCal. I know you'd enjoy it. You can swing down afterward for an offline with the SD crew Smile
An article in the NYT about how the Metropolitan Museum of Art is in serious decline is disturbing. The Met is one of the greatest museums in the world.

The Met is $40M in debt, have already downsized their payroll and put on hold their expansion plans which would have been dedicated to both Modern and Contemporary art which is clearly needed.

I would not be surprised to see major changes at the top and selling off items in their vast collection to rebalance their books.

I also think the Met must identify where they fit in the world of art going forward for the next 50-100 years as the landscape of art museums looks uniquely different than it did even 20 years ago, both in America and the world.
And yet I heard from a reliable source that they spent (or are currently spending - I'm not sure if it has launched yet) in the neighbourhood of $700K on a new website.

A big mandate for museums and galleries these days is accessibility: not only programming that appeals to a wider audience beyond the core "cultural believer" (which means balancing education with entertainment), but also access to the collection outside the physical museum space (online digital archives).
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
And yet I heard from a reliable source that they spent (or are currently spending - I'm not sure if it has launched yet) in the neighbourhood of $700K on a new website.

A big mandate for museums and galleries these days is accessibility: not only programming that appeals to a wider audience beyond the core "cultural believer" (which means balancing education with entertainment), but also access to the collection outside the physical museum space (online digital archives).


Also, VR & AR.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Jeff Koons loses plagiarism lawsuit in France.

Richard Prince, take notice!



Hard to believe that an artist of Koons's stature, with the prices his sculptures command, would copy others' works. And yet this isn't the first time he's been found guilty of copyright infringement.

I wonder whether this is a case of all publicity is good publicity; these incidents don't seem to have negatively affected his reputation much at all.
Jean Michel Basquiat work sells for over $110M this week as New York continues to be the center of the art world.

With the exception of 2009 the bull market continues now for 20 years as Contemporary Art remains the star and fashion art (see Hirst) continues to struggle for survival.

The art world still revolves around the genius of Picasso ( billions a year) and Warhol remains uber important.

Art is history and history continues to drive the art market.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Jean Michel Basquiat work sells for over $110M

I saw this as a news alert yesterday. I noted it only because Metallica's Lars Ulrich had previously owned and sold some Basquiat works, and I was wondering if he made this sale - it would have likely doubled his career earnings as a musician! Eek
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Originally posted by billhike:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Jean Michel Basquiat work sells for over $110M

I saw this as a news alert yesterday. I noted it only because Metallica's Lars Ulrich had previously owned and sold some Basquiat works, and I was wondering if he made this sale - it would have likely doubled his career earnings as a musician! Eek


I know he sold The Boxer maybe 10 years ago for for $15M (?). The market continues to explode for Basquiat as there are just so precious few which happens when you die in your 20's.

Modigliani"s work is also so very limited due to his early death and his time spent sculpting.
Gotta' say: I'm an interested observer, but I can't claim to understand it. I've genuinely fallen in love with Clyfford Still, since his museum was placed in Denver. That I get, but when I look at "Irony of Negro Policeman" or "God, Law," it seriously looks like something I'd expect from a 2nd-grader. It's listed as "abstract art." Really? What's abstract about that?

Confused
stick, always good to see you posting.

Think of JMB as you might as a person in your profession, meaning the more you understand music at its most basic form, the more you appreciate their work.

I have always thought of JMB as a neo-expressionist artist or even an American Die Neue Wilden styled artist. When dealing with concepts of fear, politics, oppression and sexuality often the most basic and even primitive forms of art offers a raw experience by stripping away known or expected visuals.
mrs bman and I visited the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts yesterday and saw Chagall Colour (note correct spelling) and Music. They were letting too many people into the exhibit which made it tough to move around and see the pieces. I wasn't aware that Chagall had done so much more than paint, such as set and costume design, stained and painted glass and puppets.

While we were there we also saw two other exhibits:

-Wedding Bliss for All à la Jean Paul Gaultier, a number of way-out-there wedding dresses, which was very interesting, and

-MNEMOSYNE When Contemporary Art and the Art of the Past Meet which had a couple of very cool pieces but most of which left us cold
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
mrs bman and I visited the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts yesterday and saw Chagall Colour (note correct spelling) and Music. They were letting too many people into the exhibit which made it tough to move around and see the pieces. I wasn't aware that Chagall had done so much more than paint, such as set and costume design, stained and painted glass and puppets.




Bman, Chagall's stained glass can be stunning. We have certainly not seen all of it, but 2 unforgettable examples are in the Cathedral in Reims, Champagne, and my favourite-- "The America Windows" in the Chicago Art Institute. I must have stood in front of the latter for almost half an hour; I was mesmerized by the content and the beautifully back-lit deep blue colour (my wife gave up on me and left, so I had to try to find her later in that massive museum; it was worth the little dispute we had afterwards Smile.) Next time you're in Chicago, I highly recommend seeing this.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
mrs bman and I visited the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts yesterday and saw Chagall Colour (note correct spelling) and Music. They were letting too many people into the exhibit which made it tough to move around and see the pieces. I wasn't aware that Chagall had done so much more than paint, such as set and costume design, stained and painted glass and puppets.




Bman, Chagall's stained glass can be stunning. We have certainly not seen all of it, but 2 unforgettable examples are in the Cathedral in Reims, Champagne, and my favourite-- "The America Windows" in the Chicago Art Institute. I must have stood in front of the latter for almost half an hour; I was mesmerized by the content and the beautifully back-lit deep blue colour (my wife gave up on me and left, so I had to try to find her later in that massive museum; it was worth the little dispute we had afterwards Smile.) Next time you're in Chicago, I highly recommend seeing this.


Thanks, SeaQ. I cannot imagine your wife ever being angry with you about anything though, she is the sunniest person I've ever met! Or were you made at her? (you're a pretty sunny guy yourself so still hard to imagine.....)

Not sure when we will be in Chicago next though, mrs bman seems to feel that she has seen and done it sufficiently for the foreseeable future. It might take some kind of wine event to persuade her otherwise!

Never been to Reims but now that her love of champagne has begun to change my lack of love for same, perhaps we will go there one of these days!
Gustav Klimt was little more than a footnote in an undergraduate art course, but after my trip to Vienna last month, he has vaulted to my top ten list -- not that he cares much. Standing before his Beethoven Frieze, perhaps like Seaquam viewing Chagall in Chicago, I lost track of time, pondering the work in its historical context as other tourists came and went. And to think, it was meant as a temporary display that was almost discarded.
quote:
Originally posted by Javachip:
Gustav Klimt was little more than a footnote in an undergraduate art course, but after my trip to Vienna last month, he has vaulted to my top ten list -- not that he cares much. Standing before his Beethoven Frieze, perhaps like Seaquam viewing Chagall in Chicago, I lost track of time, pondering the work in its historical context as other tourists came and went. And to think, it was meant as a temporary display that was almost discarded.

This was a great show: Gustav Klimt: Five Paintings from the Collection of Ferdinand and Adele Bloch-Bauer.
These were the ones returned to the family in LA that were stolen by the Nazis during WWII.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
Bman, Chagall's stained glass can be stunning. We have certainly not seen all of it, but 2 unforgettable examples are in the Cathedral in Reims, Champagne, and my favourite-- "The America Windows" in the Chicago Art Institute. I must have stood in front of the latter for almost half an hour; I was mesmerized by the content and the beautifully back-lit deep blue colour (my wife gave up on me and left, so I had to try to find her later in that massive museum; it was worth the little dispute we had afterwards Smile.) Next time you're in Chicago, I highly recommend seeing this.

Seaq, did you have a chance to walk past Chagall's public mosaic artwork in the Chase Bank Plaza in Chicago?
Chagall's The Four Seasons

VM

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