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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by billhike:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
No trip to Chicago is ever complete without a visit to the greatness of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Greatness, once again.

It's an ok place - a few interesting pieces. Wink


In my personal Top 10 for the USA.


And a walk along Canyon Road is not chopped liver!
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Originally posted by Board-O:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by billhike:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
No trip to Chicago is ever complete without a visit to the greatness of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Greatness, once again.

It's an ok place - a few interesting pieces. Wink


In my personal Top 10 for the USA.


And a walk along Canyon Road is not chopped liver!


Indeed. Don't overlook the Railyard district as well on your next visit.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by billhike:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
No trip to Chicago is ever complete without a visit to the greatness of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Greatness, once again.

It's an ok place - a few interesting pieces. Wink


In my personal Top 10 for the USA.

For art museums--Top 3.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by billhike:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
No trip to Chicago is ever complete without a visit to the greatness of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Greatness, once again.

It's an ok place - a few interesting pieces. Wink


In my personal Top 10 for the USA.

For art museums--Top 3.


And your Top 5, are?
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Originally posted by fcs:
I implore all of you who have any interest in art, collecting, and understanding the way big art galleries operate, to buy this book!!

Published last year, the data and information gathered is recent and intriguing.

Trying to get this guy to do a book talk, need to work my connections!

https://www.amazon.com/Selling...olving/dp/1621534626


Thanks fcs, just ordered for delivery tomorrow.

Also just emailed you an iPhone picture of a piece we bought recently.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by KSC02:
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
I'm not sure if this is breaking news here...huge haul of works in Munich...German police recover 1,500 modernist masterpieces 'looted by Nazis'

I wonder what will emerge. German police apparently kept the find secret for two years, over concerns of restitution, claims and diplomatic issues.

I sincerely wish the best to the ancestors of the true owners of these works and that they are able to successfully reclaim what is theirs. Be damned those that supported this blatant thievry.


+1.

Not only what was stolen by these thugs, but so many pieces were burned being tagged as degenerate art that can never be returned to their owner or their family.

The Swiss are dirty in all this cover-up as well.


We watched the Woman in Gold tonight and it got me to thinking about this. I admit i didn't do a lot of research but the only relavent article I could find (from Jan '16) Few Answers... is very disturbing. Basically, what one can surmise is 'they' generally got away with the looting.

w+a, you are a very keen participant in the art world. Are there any recent developments regarding restitution, pending litigation or, at the very least, displays of these works? Any other recent cases that found a similar fate, or have had a happier ending?
Spent the afternoon wandering in future, a collection of art, dance, music, sculpture and other installations spread over the 14 acres that make up the West Island of Ontario Place. Those who grew up in the area will remember this as the home of the Cinesphere, Wilderness Log Ride, and silos depicting northern Ontario. Time has taken its toll on the place. Crumbling buildings are rusted and overgrown, concrete channels that once guided faux log boats are collapsing and play spaces that used to be filled with screaming kids are empty and dark. This quasi-dystopian setting was perfect for a multi-layered art exhibition and for those who have a chance, it's definitely worth a wander. On 'til Sept 25th. Added bonus: the entire venue is licensed and if you're willing to pony up $8.50 for a beer, you can meander around the island with it. (I know that sounds sounds crazy to those outside Ontario, but this is a huge step forward for the KGBO).
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Originally posted by Italian Wino:
Saw DaVinci's Lady with an Ermine on exhibit in a castle in Poland last week. A Very important rare painting and it was a pleasure to finally see it.

IW


There are just so few paintings by this master and always special when you get to view one in person. This painting is generally accepted as one of his although there are still experts who differ.
We'll be spending this afternoon at the Pompidou for the extensive Magritte exhibition. Smile

My interest has also been piqued by an exhibit that will open today entitled Polyphonies, described as "the voice as a shapable material, involving the human body in its relationship with sound and space." They do some innovative work at the Pompidou; can hardly wait to see-- or hear-- what this is about.
We are looking forward to an afternoon and evening of art galleries here in Berlin before heading to London.

We will get a private viewing at Sexauer before their show opening on the 26th. We then will visit 5 other galleries with our tour host who is also a critic for the local newspaper.

We are excited to see both emerging artist as well as mid-career and established artist today. For D and me, the local art scene gives us much insight to the current vibe of any city.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I never expected to see a Raphael in Dresden.

Wow!


Without googling the painting, I can say the two cherubs looking skywards, in the painting you must be speaking of, is an incredibly iconic image. It is so prevalent on tourist items in Italy, I was surprised when I first found out the painting was in Dresden.
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Originally posted by Seaquam:
We'll be spending this afternoon at the Pompidou for the extensive Magritte exhibition. Smile

My interest has also been piqued by an exhibit that will open today entitled Polyphonies, described as "the voice as a shapable material, involving the human body in its relationship with sound and space." They do some innovative work at the Pompidou; can hardly wait to see-- or hear-- what this is about.

Seaquam, enjoy, and please let us know if it's worth seeing.
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Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
We'll be spending this afternoon at the Pompidou for the extensive Magritte exhibition. Smile

My interest has also been piqued by an exhibit that will open today entitled Polyphonies, described as "the voice as a shapable material, involving the human body in its relationship with sound and space." They do some innovative work at the Pompidou; can hardly wait to see-- or hear-- what this is about.


Seaquam, enjoy, and please let us know if it's worth seeing.



Yes, absolutely worth viewing the Magritte exhibit! It shows some of the different motifs in his work and arranges them chronologically. One thing that surprised me was the size of some of his famous works-- I had assumed them to be large canvasses, given the "size" of his impact on surrealism, but they were actually fairly small. I really enjoyed the wit he displayed, as well as the expected innovation. I would love to have been able to spend an evening with the artist, hearing him discuss his motivations and experiences firsthand. You and C. will enjoy it, and no doubt talk about it for a while afterwards, perhaps in the very nice bar at the top of the Pompidou which I didn't know about until we went up there for the first time. Great views of Paris, too. Smile

The Polyphonies exhibit unfortunately was not ready, despite Oct. 19th being its announced opening day. We watched some of the sound engineers working on the exhibits, and it does look interesting. I hope you'll be able to tell me what it was like, especially one room with music stands and large 'rocks' placed on a big white gravel surface (at least that what it looked like from a distance). I'm assuming there will be specific music, or perhaps other sounds, to accompany this. I'd be interested to know what the audio portion is like, but not interested enough to go back.

The permanent collection at this museum is always worth enjoying as well, if you like contemporary art. In addition, something we hadn't expected is a current exhibit called "Kollektsia" which is a large display of contemporary Russian/USSR art from around 1950-2000, with some very interesting pieces, some utilizing unusual media, highly entertaining and informative.
We went to a museum new to me, Jacquemart-André Museum on Boulevard Haussmann, to see a fairly extensive Rembrandt exhibit.

The museum is a fantastic mansion, fully restored and very beautiful, in a commercial part of Paris. I was more intrigued by this magnificent property than by the Rembrandts. I think it's actually worth going to see this building no matter what the current exhibit may be. It's very easy to imagine what life would have been like for the exceedingly wealthy (this was originally the home to a banking family) a couple of centuries ago. Even the furnishings-- many original, others acquired and restored-- are fabulous.
Yesterday we went to see the Bernard Buffet exhibition at the Musée d'Art Moderne in the Palais de Tokyo.

We love the venue so we were going there anyway; I hadn't heard of Bernard Buffet previously, but am very glad we were introduced to his work-- powerful and primitive; some pieces were disturbing, others even more disturbing, his work is mainly bleak and challenging, with motifs that lean to death and mythology. His work is not easily forgettable once seen.

This show is on until Feb. 2017. Highly recommended. And the permanent displays in this incredible space should also be enjoyed; many impressive pieces from great artists, displayed in a unique and very beautiful setting.
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Originally posted by Seaquam:
Yesterday we went to see the Bernard Buffet exhibition at the Musée d'Art Moderne in the Palais de Tokyo.

We love the venue so we were going there anyway; I hadn't heard of Bernard Buffet previously, but am very glad we were introduced to his work-- powerful and primitive; some pieces were disturbing, others even more disturbing, his work is mainly bleak and challenging, with motifs that lean to death and mythology. His work is not easily forgettable once seen.

This show is on until Feb. 2017. Highly recommended. And the permanent displays in this incredible space should also be enjoyed; many impressive pieces from great artists, displayed in a unique and very beautiful setting.


Sea, I love BB's work. I have made serious bids on his work twice now but unfortunately came up empty.

I'm confident we will secure one of his works though. We should have pulled the trigger prior to his death. He was a brilliant printmaker.

I'm glad you enjoyed his art.

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