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At Frank Lloyd Wright's designed Kentuck Knob today in PA, besides the great house the current owner's (Peter Palumbo) sculpture collection is mind blowing. Starting with this first piece in 1992 by Andy Goldsworthy there is now a second. In addition three Anthony Caro's, a Chicago fav Harry Bertoia, an Oldenburg and 24 more works. But if there weren't enough there's also a unbelievable furniture collection: From Wright's long destroyed Imperial Hotel a Peacock chair, a George Jetson looking office chair from the Price Tower in Oklahoma and another Wright chair from 1904. A Wright children's' chair from the Coonley Playhouse. How about six, yes six, Josef Hoffman chairs? Alvar Alto's, leather Eames chairs, it just goes on and on. Not enough? There's even a working Rennie Mackintosh clock. I was just there for the building, I didn't know about the other stuff and it's just about as signnificant.
This pretty much sums up my feeling up visiting the Pittsburgh Andy Warhol Museum's new show.

I did not know that it had traveled, in another form, first. When doing my planning for the trip I saw that there would be a Weiwei exhibit at the Warhol. I was a bit disappointed because I'm not a fan. And indeed a number of Warhol's works were removed for the show.

However, an art highlight for us in Pittsburgh was The Mattress Factory. A good old collection of funky re-adapted buildings with cite specific art installations. Among the highlights were David Bowen's Space Junk and Sarah Oppenheimer's Scary Matta-Clark like cut through the building with it's inserted sculptural form.

A truly fascinating place that is highly recommended.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
This pretty much sums up my feeling up visiting the Pittsburgh Andy Warhol Museum's new show.

I did not know that it had traveled, in another form, first. When doing my planning for the trip I saw that there would be a Weiwei exhibit at the Warhol. I was a bit disappointed because I'm not a fan. And indeed a number of Warhol's works were removed for the show.

However, an art highlight for us in Pittsburgh was The Mattress Factory. A good old collection of funky re-adapted buildings with cite specific art installations. Among the highlights were David Bowen's Space Junk and Sarah Oppenheimer's Scary Matta-Clark like cut through the building with it's inserted sculptural form.

A truly fascinating place that is highly recommended.


Thanks for the post!

As for Allen and his review, I have never been a fan of his. Always seemingly devoid of wit and imagination IMO. I'm glad he no long is with Financial Review.
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Originally posted by wine+art:

Heading to the Nasher Sculpture Garden to see the Joel Shapiro exhibit this weekend.




What a fantastic venue for displaying art! We loved walking around outside there, a very special place seemingly removed from the hustle and bustle just outside its walls. Nice to have a place like that in your town, huh?
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Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:

Heading to the Nasher Sculpture Garden to see the Joel Shapiro exhibit this weekend.




What a fantastic venue for displaying art! We loved walking around outside there, a very special place seemingly removed from the hustle and bustle just outside its walls. Nice to have a place like that in your town, huh, eh?


Sea, special indeed.

Their evening concerts are wonderful in such a grand setting and they have many ( free) events for children of all ages. Our 3 year old granddaughter loves going there.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by sunnylea57:
Bowie's art collection is up for auction:

http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/a...d-bowie-art-sothebys

I love Auerbach's Head of Gerda Boehm.


I wonder why all the art is being sold? Confused

A somewhat eclectic collection with excellent pieces for sure. I think the Basquiat will far exceed their estimate.

Iman wants to cash out while he's still fresh in people's minds?

The auction will include over 400 pieces. Here's a slideshow with many of the same images as in the GQ article, but half a dozen more at the end.

http://www.sothebys.com/en/new...s-private-collection

And the auction catalogues can be ordered here:

http://www.sothebys.com/conten...rder-catalogues.html
sunnylea, you might be correct but seems odd to me unless she just did not enjoy the art. The value will have little to zero affect due to him owning it. His collection has a strong buyers base solely on the artist themselves, not because he owned it. Who knows....

I'm more than confident that in the event of my or my brides death we will not sell the art. Wink
For fans of Diebenkorn this four volume catalog coming out in the fall will be nothing but stunning.



BERKELEY, CA.- The Richard Diebenkorn Foundation and Yale University Press today announced the October 18, 2016 publication of Richard Diebenkorn: The Catalogue Raisonné, the definitive resource on the singular American artist’s unique works, including sketches; drawings; paintings on paper, board, canvas; and sculptural objects. This seminal, magnificently produced four volume, 2,000 page reference contains more than 5,000 works illustrated in stunning new color photography and exhaustively documented, including many works published for the first time. An art historical and publishing event, the catalogue, $400.00, is the culmination of more than twenty years of work the Diebenkorn family initiated shortly after the artist’s death and will ensure his place in the history of 20th century art.

“The complexity, the passion, the struggle—it's all here," says independent curator and author Jane Livingston, who edited the catalogue with Andrea Liguori, Managing Director of the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation. “He was brilliant and wanted to be understood,” she adds, remarking that Diebenkorn’s handwritten studio notes made between the 1950s and 1970s and reproduced in their original form will provide new information about his approach to artmaking. In addition to a bibliography and list of exhibitions, the catalogue contains a richly illustrated chronology by Daisy Murray Holman that features the voices of the artist; his wife Phyllis Diebenkorn (d. 2015);
and many others, much of which is previously unpublished.

For specialists and enthusiasts alike, the catalogue features essays by scholars of Richard Diebenkorn: art historian, curator and former Director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Gerald Nordland, author of Richard Diebenkorn (Rizzoli, 1987) who writes about the early years; museum professional, curator and scholar Steven Nash, co-organizer of Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953–1966 (2013) at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, who writes about the artist’s representational work; Chief Curator Emeritus of Painting and Sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art John Elderfield, who organized The Drawings of Richard Diebenkorn (1989) and writes about the Ocean Park paintings; and former Curator of Modern Prints and Drawings at the National Gallery of Art Ruth E. Fine, who writes in the catalogue about the artist’s drawings.

Adds Ms. Livingston: "We were stunned by how monumental his output had been. The majority of the works Diebenkorn produced—well over half—never left the artist’s possession.” She asserts that many of these drawings and paintings on paper, never before reproduced or seen, are "heartbreakingly beautiful, completely fresh, exciting and important, among the best things he ever made” and “will be a revelation to even the most knowledgeable Diebenkorn aficionado.”

The artist's widow inspired a fresh editorial approach that departs from other catalogues raisonnés and, says Ms. Livingston, sets a new standard. "Phyllis [Diebenkorn] wanted viewers to have that experience of reading a book—looking at beautiful pages and stumbling upon the works." To that end, brief essays by Ms. Livingston are embedded among the works in Volumes Two, Three and Four, illuminating the circumstances of his life at different times and discussing aspects of his work as it evolves. And, she says: “Every Ocean Park painting and most of the other major paintings are reproduced one to a page."

The catalogue raisonné was printed at Trifolio Press in Verona, Italy, using their proprietary color technology, which provides a range and depth of color that has not been possible until now. It has been produced in association with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Ms. Livingston organized the highly acclaimed retrospective The Art of Richard Diebenkorn (1997) at the Whitney Museum of American Art and authored the accompanying exhibition catalogue. The author of many books on painting, sculpture and photography, she served as Curator of 20th-century Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Associate Director and Chief Curator of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

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