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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by MJAlbers:
I watched the documentary on Beltracchi on Netflix last week...what a talent...what a shame!


MJ, I was just thinking about you. Have not seen you here or FB... Hope all is well.

I might be heading your way this year. I will contact you if I do.

All the best...
w+a, yes, please do reach out if you make it up here; it would be great to see you! I haven't been on FB for awhile, but all is well! Cheers!
Not really sure if this is the appropriate thread and I realize that this will unlikely have no meaning to those on here, but I felt compelled to share the loss of a great man in Columbus, OH. I just found out that Denny Griffith passed away today.

Denny was an artist and the recent past president of the Columbus College of Art and Design (CCAD). I was lucky enough to know Denny as his wife was my former boss. Together they have been a great positive influence on my life. Denny was one of the kindest, most compassionate and funniest people I have ever met. Beth and Denny both retired and were looking forward to their next adventure in life when he was diagnosed soon after with cancer. He spent the last year or so feverishly painting, and what will now be his last show opened at CCAD earlier this month. I'm no art afficiando, but I always enjoyed his paintings. But I enjoyed having him in my life more. Even though I hadn't seen him much since his battle began two years ago, I will miss him.
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Originally posted by eyesintime:
Not really sure if this is the appropriate thread and I realize that this will unlikely have no meaning to those on here, but I felt compelled to share the loss of a great man in Columbus, OH. I just found out that Denny Griffith passed away today.

Denny was an artist and the recent past president of the Columbus College of Art and Design (CCAD). I was lucky enough to know Denny as his wife was my former boss. Together they have been a great positive influence on my life. Denny was one of the kindest, most compassionate and funniest people I have ever met. Beth and Denny both retired and were looking forward to their next adventure in life when he was diagnosed soon after with cancer. He spent the last year or so feverishly painting, and what will now be his last show opened at CCAD earlier this month. I'm no art afficiando, but I always enjoyed his paintings. But I enjoyed having him in my life more. Even though I hadn't seen him much since his battle began two years ago, I will miss him.


Sorry to hear of your loss, eyesintime. Sounds like he was a special person in so many ways.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm sure no one other than me has been following the trail against the once great Knoedler & Co. art gallery but it has been so interesting.

An art gallery for 165 years in NYC and over 100 years in London and Paris and the amount of fraud which finally caused their demise is shocking to me.
Thanks for sharing w+a, I had not been following this. Sadly, I cannot imagine how many private and public art collections contain fraudulent works unknowingly.
Wine + Art, this is a great story. Happens all to often, unfortunately. Every couple of years we get a bombshell exposé about dealers crossing the line. Apparently Knoedler's director, Ann Freedman, started acquiring work for resale from a discredited LI art dealer, Glafira Rosales. There were several pieces Rosales had that were KNOWN fakes from previous cases. Rosales was also secretive about the provenance of the work, a major cause for suspicion, a Caveat Emptor deal-breaker in most people's eyes!

Either Freedman was working in collusion with Rosales, or she just had enough trustful buyers lined up that she just thought they would not question her authority. Hubris unchecked...
Where do you put your money in this uncertain economy? Seems many are putting their money in art.

I talked to two friends that own galleries here in Santa Fe and both said they are having their best January and February, ever. A friend and I bought the wine for a private opening for Dallas artist JD Miller a couple of weeks ago at his Samuel Lynne Gallery. JD told me he was leaving the next day to deliver $500,000 of his art to a couple in Aspen for their new home. This was the single largest onetime purchase for JD.

I read this morning that Ken Griffin just paid $500M for one de Kooning and one Pollock.
Here is the story about Ken Griffin spending 500M on two pieces of art

Billionaire art collector Ken Griffin has dropped $500 million on two paintings, effectively breaking the record for the most expensive private sale of art.

The 47-year-old hedge fund tycoon closed the deal last fall, according to Bloomberg, which had the story, reportedly paying Hollywood magnate David Geffen $300 million for Willem de Kooning's 1955 oil painting Interchange, and around $200 million for Jackson Pollock's Number 17A (1948).


The estimated sale of these paintings is a record for both of the Abstract Expressionist masters. For context, the de Kooning piece fetched a mere $20.7 million back in 1989—already an auction record for the artist at the time. According to the artnet Price Database, his current auction record is $32 million, set in 2013 at Christie's New York by Untitled VIII. Pollock's most expensive sale at auction to date is Number 19, which fetched $58.3 million at Christie's New York in 2013.


The $300 million price tag on the de Kooning matches the 2015 private sale of Paul Gauguin's Nafea Faa Ipoipo (When Will You Marry?). The seller, Swiss art collector Rudolf Staechelin, is rumored to have sold the record-breaking canvas to the Qatar Museums.

While this recent sale is sure to shock, it isn't necessarily surprising considering the collector in question. As founder of the investment firm Citadel, Griffin is the state of Illinois's wealthiest person, boasting a net worth of $6 billion.

Furthermore, Griffin has been an active force in the art world, serving as member of multiple museum boards including the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and the Art Institute of Chicago. Just last December, Griffin gifted the Museum of Modern Art in New York a lofty $40 million donation. According to Bloomberg, Griffin's art collection was valued at $2.3 billion before the most recent transaction.

Acquiring market-hot art, after all, is a common method for turning a profit—as long as the works come with flawless provenance, of course. Ten years ago, Geffen sold a painting by Jackson Pollock for a hefty $140 million, then the highest reported price ever paid for a painting.

Private sales tend to facilitate higher prices than the auction market, where the record for a single artwork remains a comparatively paltry $179.4 million, for Pablo Picasso's Les Femme d'Algers (Version "O").
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Originally posted by wine+art:
JD told me he was leaving the next day to deliver $500,000 of his art to a couple in Aspen for their new home.


This is a guy who paints in '3-D' with layered oil paint?

If so I have two pieces a floral one I always just considered decorative and an abstract one which I like a lot and is in my office right now. I remember these being under $1000. That was more than 10 years ago, maybe 15? Same guy? Sounds like I should raise my insurance rider on them.
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Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
JD told me he was leaving the next day to deliver $500,000 of his art to a couple in Aspen for their new home.


This is a guy who paints in '3-D' with layered oil paint?

If so I have two pieces a floral one I always just considered decorative and an abstract one which I like a lot and is in my office right now. I remember these being under $1000. That was more than 10 years ago, maybe 15? Same guy? Sounds like I should raise my insurance rider on them.


Paul, same guy. He went by Jay Miller 10+ years ago, now JD Miller. Depending on the size his works are $10,000 - $60,000+. Go to the Samuel Lynne Gallery ( Dallas) to see his current work. He and Phil Romano ( Fuddruckers, Macaroni Grill, EatZi's, heart stent early investor ) own the gallery.

JD's wife ( Lea Fisher) is also an artist represented by Samuel Lynne Galleries. JD's brother, Scott is a very successful photographer. All are really solid people and a lot of fun to be around.
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Originally posted by wine+art:

JD's wife ( Lea Fisher) is also an artist represented by Samuel Lynne Galleries. JD's brother, Scott is a very successful photographer. All are really solid people and a lot of fun to be around.


Thanks great info. I like the style of built up paint and 3-D a lot. One of my favorites is a New Orleans artist Natalie Boos who also adds glass, slate and other solid objects to her paintings. She paints in a style like early Michalopoulos but with layers and what I might call a little grittier tone, which to me makes it more authentic New Orleans.

She called me over New Years to say she's going to start painting again (she's been in Belize since 2012). I knew her stuff was going for 5x-8x what we paid for it and she said that was one reason she wanted to start painting again. Commercially it was always difficult for her, each painting took 3-9 months and was really impossible to do prints or lithos of. I remember many times visiting her and she'd only have 3 or 4 paintings for sale.

Both Miller paintings I have are square the flowers slightly smaller than the abstract, I'd guess 36 x 36 and 40 x 40.
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Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
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Originally posted by wine+art:

JD's wife ( Lea Fisher) is also an artist represented by Samuel Lynne Galleries. JD's brother, Scott is a very successful photographer. All are really solid people and a lot of fun to be around.




Both Miller paintings I have are square the flowers slightly smaller than the abstract, I'd guess 36 x 36 and 40 x 40.


Paul, nice. An insurance value of $20-$30,000 I would guess.
Viewing alert: Every Monday this month TCM is featuring films about art and artists. Now many of these films are pure shit, like the mostly fictionalized biopics about El Greco, Michelangelo, Van Gogh, etc. It might be worth a look to see the rarely shown Charles Laughton 1936 film, Rembrandt. Of interest is a rare on screen performance by theater superstar Gertrude Lawrence.

There is also a film W+A and I strongly disagree on, Picasso Summer, based on a Ray Bradbury story first published in Playboy. Never released in theaters it is available on DVD if you're looking for a present for W+A.

Finally there's one of my favorite low budget Roger Corman films, A Bucket of Blood. Nerdy Walter Paisley is a lowly busboy who suddenly has a talent for making very anatomically correct sculptures. At the same time people, mostly beatniks, seem to be disappearing. Is it simply another low budget Corman film or a satire on the late 50s state of modern art? You be the judge.
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Originally posted by fcs:
"Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict" is a terrific documentary, years of old audio and video interviews that were rediscovered in a box a few years ago by an art historian. Should be on Netflix in the next year or so.


fcs, I hope you are well.

D and I saw this film the opening weekend. Excellent indeed. We can't wait to see it again.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
Nice spotlight on the Dallas Art Museum's Jackson Pollock exhibit on CBS Sunday Morning.


The finest exhibit I have been to in many years and one of the very finest ever.

I have been twice and the DMA recently reported that over 20% of their attendance was for a second or third visit. On my second visit I sat on a Barcelona bench and just listened to peoples conversation for almost an hour. I wish there was a recording of the conversations in each room.... Fascinating in so many ways.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
Streaming on Netflix now is, Raiders of the Lost Art. Each episode looks at art that was lost or stolen and sometimes recovered. History Channel style documentary, but apparently unlike HC, well done. Some episodes include, "Hitler's Art Dealer" and "Vanishing Vermeers."


I've added this to my watch-list. Thanks.
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This just made my day! Cool

My children tend to be outliers ( thank goodness) and I worry we have a generation or two that no longer appreciates the Arts and Letters.

I took our three year old granddaughter to several galleries yesterday. When she comes to our home she always wants to do an 'art walk' with her Papa. This child will be well taken care of in our will. Big Grin

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