Architecture and Design thread

We saw a ton of Gaudi buildings/complexes while in Barcelona recently, including several that were withing walking distance of our hotel. Quite interesting and imaginative. Like Picasso, the guy was productive as hell in his chosen field. A shame the way he died.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by VinT:
Happy 148th birthday to Frank Lloyd Wright. A remarkable life full of ups and downs and a lasting legacy of work unlike any other architect, including IMO any current starchitect.


Your favorite architect?


i do love how falling water was nick named rising mildew by the elder kaufmann =).. beautiful house though and i love the clean designs compared to the mess that we call calatrava.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
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Originally posted by VinT:
Happy 148th birthday to Frank Lloyd Wright. A remarkable life full of ups and downs and a lasting legacy of work unlike any other architect, including IMO any current starchitect.


Your favorite architect?

Indeed. On the list of things I will do upon winning the lottery is rescue a FLW house and restore it to original condition.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Pietro Belluschi was one of the most important architects of the 20th century.


Because of things like Tiny House or things like the brutalist Julliard?

I see Brutalism getting more and more respect. I don't know if it's because the buildings have aged enough to admire in their historical context as opposed to despising them in a contemporary one or if people's views on architecture are just changing.
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Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Pietro Belluschi was one of the most important architects of the 20th century.


Because of things like Tiny House or things like the brutalist Julliard?



Rob, I was thinking because of his time as the dean of M.I.T. Architecture and Design and his lasting influence of so many, plus the 1000 plus buildings he designed.
I'm joining an architectural tour of what many think is the oldest church in the USA later this afternoon here in Santa Fe.

The San Miguel Chapel has recorded history from 1628, but it is believed to be much older than that. Santa Fe is covered with snow currently but a sunny and warmish day. Looking forward to hearing more about the history of the building.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm joining an architectural tour of what many think is the oldest church in the USA later this afternoon here in Santa Fe.

The San Miguel Chapel has recorded history from 1628, but it is believed to be much older than that. Santa Fe is covered with snow currently but a sunny and warmish day. Looking forward to hearing more about the history of the building.


Nice. I visited that in the late 80s with my parents. I don't remember much about it now, but I remember it was a good time.
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I'm joining an architectural tour of what many think is the oldest church in the USA later this afternoon here in Santa Fe.

The San Miguel Chapel has recorded history from 1628, but it is believed to be much older than that. Santa Fe is covered with snow currently but a sunny and warmish day. Looking forward to hearing more about the history of the building.


Nice. I visited that in the late 80s with my parents. I don't remember much about it now, but I remember it was a good time.


aphilla, it was we worth the time. The chapel is still holding services weekly, and part of the building still has dirt floors.
I had the pleasure of viewing ( and talking a few photos) the Schindler masterpiece in Newport Beach yesterday, the Lovell beach home.

The now 90 year old architecture has withstood the test of time and could look eye to eye with a Le Corbusier design without blinking.

I would love for someone to write an article about everyone that has lived in this architecture gem. Thank you Old Man for including this in our agenda.
Took the architectural tour again last week in Chicago. It had been several years since my last tour and Chicago had added several new and excellent buildings with several more breaking ground next year.

Always well worth the tour since the best sides of the buildings face the river.
You're gonna love Berlin. Brilliant modern architecture abounds and it seems as though they are building everywhere. The dome on the top of the Bundestag was a particular favorite of my son and I particularly in the late afternoon/early evening as the diminishing light reflects through it.

Make sure to submit your formal request to go up there asap. If they turn you down as demand can be high email back a nice letter about how much you would like to see it. That's what I did and it worked. Hopefully won't be necessary though.

And racers suggestion to rent bikes and spend time riding around the tiergarten was another high point. Comparable to Central Park in NYC but less crowded, less traffic and more natural setting. It would be on my don't miss list of you are up for a bike ride
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Originally posted by BOMBA503:
You're gonna love Berlin. Brilliant modern architecture abounds and it seems as though they are building everywhere. The dome on the top of the Bundestag was a particular favorite of my son and I particularly in the late afternoon/early evening as the diminishing light reflects through

Make sure to submit your formal request to go up there asap. If they turn you down as demand can be high email back a nice letter about how much you would like to see it. That's what I did and it worked. Hopefully won't be necessary though.

And racers suggestion to rent bikes and spend time riding around the tiergarten was another high point. Comparable to Central Park in NYC but less crowded, less traffic and more natural setting. It would be on my don't miss list of you are up for a bike ride


Thank you BOMBA. I appreciate your thoughts. Our airline tickets are bought.

We use a concierge service that we have had great success with including reservations at restaurants, wineries ( Unico) and private art exhibits that are not open to the public.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Took the architectural tour again last week in Chicago. It had been several years since my last tour and Chicago had added several new and excellent buildings with several more breaking ground next year.

Always well worth the tour since the best sides of the buildings face the river.


You did the boat tour? There are a number of walking tours also, I think.

We did the boat tour last night. I've been here 30 years and finally got around to it. Spectacular.

That high rise that is going up with the small foot print where most of the building overhangs, all the way up 30 or so stories, whew. I'm sure the engineering for it is fine, but still, I don't think I want to go in that building.
I know the boat tour is a lot of fun, but it really is a tourist's tour. The CAF's greatest tour is the "Historic Skyscrapers Tours" walking tour. Not only do you get up close and personal with beautiful old buildings like the Mondanock, Fischer and Reliance building, but you go inside to see the great Frank Lloyd Wright remodeling of the lobby of the Rookery and the amazing mosaic historical display in the Marquette building. If you've not done this tour your missing perhaps the most important elements of Chicago's famous architecture.
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Took the architectural tour again last week in Chicago. It had been several years since my last tour and Chicago had added several new and excellent buildings with several more breaking ground next year.

Always well worth the tour since the best sides of the buildings face the river.


You did the boat tour? There are a number of walking tours also, I think.

We did the boat tour last night. I've been here 30 years and finally got around to it. Spectacular.

That high rise that is going up with the small foot print where most of the building overhangs, all the way up 30 or so stories, whew. I'm sure the engineering for it is fine, but still, I don't think I want to go in that building.


aphilla, we have done both the walking and the river tours. I much prefer the river tour. The buildings are designed to face the river and only from the river and at a distance can you truly view the buildings.

I think the building you are talking about is the 150 North Riverside project designed by Goettsch Partners. It truly is an engineering marvel.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
aphilla, we have done both the walking and the river tours. I much prefer the river tour.

That's because you never did it with me when I was a volunteer for the CAF. We're at odds here. The buildings that made Chicago's reputation for architecture, from the late 19th century to the fifties, are mostly not visible from the river. These include all the buildings I mentioned--where Chicago was developing the language of the skyscraper (the Chicago School) up to the Mies' Federal Building. Almost nothing is visible from Burnham & Root (the unbelievably ahead of its time Reliance Building, William Le Baron Jenney (the godfather of the tall building), and Louis Sullivan (Wright's "Lieber Meister.") Get off that boat and walk!

Though out dated Chicago on Foot (last updated on 1994) this is an indispensable book that anyone who lives in and near Chicago, with an interest in architecture, should own.

Also highly recommended is Guide to Chicago's Historic Suburbs which gives about 40 walking tours outside of Chicago proper. Again way out of date, but the most important building of the area still stand. I walked almost all of them and was greatly rewarded.
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
aphilla, we have done both the walking and the river tours. I much prefer the river tour.

That's because you never did it with me when I was a volunteer for the CAF. We're at odds here. The buildings that made Chicago's reputation for architecture, from the late 19th century to the fifties, are mostly not visible from the river. These include all the buildings I mentioned--where Chicago was developing the language of the skyscraper (the Chicago School) up to the Mies' Federal Building. Almost nothing is visible from Burnham & Root (the unbelievably ahead of its time Reliance Building, William Le Baron Jenney (the godfather of the tall building), and Louis Sullivan (Wright's "Lieber Meister.") Get off that boat and walk!

Though out dated Chicago on Foot (last updated on 1994) this is an indispensable book that anyone who lives in and near Chicago, with an interest in architecture, should own.

Also highly recommended is Guide to Chicago's Historic Suburbs which gives about 40 walking tours outside of Chicago proper. Again way out of date, but the most important building of the area still stand. I walked almost all of them and was greatly rewarded.


I overwhelmingly prefer the buildings from the late '60's-70' - to the some 40+ buildings under construction today.

Load bearing brick buildings were too limited overall in design due to engineering. The buildings SOM and others designed devoid of load bearing exteriors are just offer far more imagination. Curtain wall is Chicago.

You do enjoy living in the past! Wink
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I overwhelmingly prefer the buildings from the late '60's-70' - to the some 40+ buildings under construction today.

Load bearing brick buildings were too limited overall in design due to engineering. The buildings SOM and others designed devoid of load bearing exteriors are just offer far more imagination. Curtain wall is Chicago.

You do enjoy living in the past! Wink

I must point out that all the great buildings of the Chicago School, except for one, do not use exterior load bearing walls but use steel skeleton structures--in fact William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building--1885!--is considered the first of these in the world. The men I listed grappled with the problem of how a skyscraper should look. It's their success in this that led to Chicago's undisputed role of being architecture capital of America.

As for living the the past I know for a fact that your favorite Spanish painter died a long time ago. Wink Wink
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Originally posted by The Old Man:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
I overwhelmingly prefer the buildings from the late '60's-70' - to the some 40+ buildings under construction today.

Load bearing brick buildings were too limited overall in design due to engineering. The buildings SOM and others designed devoid of load bearing exteriors are just offer far more imagination. Curtain wall is Chicago.

You do enjoy living in the past! Wink

I must point out that all the great buildings of the Chicago School, except for one, do not use exterior load bearing walls but use steel skeleton structures--in fact William Le Baron Jenney's Home Insurance Building--1885!--is considered the first of these in the world. His Manhattan Building--1891--is the oldest existing steel frame building in the world. The men I listed grappled with the problem of how a skyscraper should look. It's their success in this that led to Chicago's undisputed role of being architecture capital of America.

As for living the the past I know for a fact that your favorite Spanish painter died a long time ago. Wink Wink
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Originally posted by wine+art:


I think the building you are talking about is the 150 North Riverside project designed by Goettsch Partners. It truly is an engineering marvel.


That's the one. It was funny how everyone was pointing at it and talking about it when we went past twice and then the docent finally talked about it the last time we went by it.

I am sure it's an engineering marvel, and structurally sound, but it hits a serious phobia button for me.

My wife, niece, and I agreed that the Aqua building is pretty special. I was looking at it quite a bit earlier this year when I was at a meeting down the street. I was glad to get more background on it during the tour.
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Originally posted by aphilla:
I am sure it's an engineering marvel, and structurally sound, but it hits a serious phobia button for me.

That's the one that caught my eye when we were on the boat tour a couple weeks ago, and I'm with you - amazing feat but made me think "uh, no".
i must admit that i am getting very tired of all the new copy cat designs nowadays that feature glass walls for public spaces

everything is see through and transparent

I find this incredibly lazy and uninspired.

They use a poor excuse that it's the building as a whole, but i digress.

what makes a work classic isnt the ugly use of glass everything but what potentially hides the mysteries from outside to in.
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Originally posted by wine+art:
Seeing pictures of Dresden only 15 years ago and walking the streets now makes my head spin.

Well done, Dresden!


I know what you mean. Both Dresden and Cologne gave a lot latitude to architects in reconstruction. Both are underrated destinations IMHO.
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Originally posted by g-man:
i must admit that i am getting very tired of all the new copy cat designs nowadays that feature glass walls for public spaces

everything is see through and transparent

I find this incredibly lazy and uninspired.

They use a poor excuse that it's the building as a whole, but i digress.

what makes a work classic isnt the ugly use of glass everything but what potentially hides the mysteries from outside to in.


My former company had an office like this in the EU and claimed it allowed them significantly reduce energy needs. When they built a new HQ building in the US they used the exact same design.

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