This tread is for those interested in A/D on any level.

My interest in A/D is nascent, but hope to learn much in the future. I admit, I cannot name many architects by name anymore, but the ones I could have named waited far too long to answer RFIs! Designers always seemed much more willing to banter, about anything, really. Here it goes:

After 4 or 5 visits, this past Saturday, we finally got to see the Burghley House Interior. 16th century Elizabethan structure, with many, I'd imagine, remodels. Notable 18th cent. Italianate wall and ceiling frescos; very creative wood carvings and plastered coffered ceilings. Unexpected 'Purgatorial' staircase...seemed a bit out of place.

Sidebar, TOM 'mentioned' Brueghel the younger: among the mostly mundane portraits and religious works, I found myself lingering vis-à-vis with Rent Day. Happy to say I picked the painter, but likely a lucky guess.
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I guess we won't be talking about architectural designs for the average person's home. Because I would be interested to hear some thoughts on modifying the roof line of a cape cod. Smile


Big Grin

I'm dealing with an architect quite a bit these days. every time he shows up to my house with a new set of plans, my dreams of purchasing some Coche-Dury become further and further removed...
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I guess we won't be talking about architectural designs for the average person's home. Because I would be interested to hear some thoughts on modifying the roof line of a cape cod. Smile


Big Grin

I'm dealing with an architect quite a bit these days. every time he shows up to my house with a new set of plans, my dreams of purchasing some Coche-Dury become further and further removed...


ha! wait til you finally decide on something and move ahead with it, then see the costs associated with everything they missed when they issue the IFC set!
D and I are taking in the AIA Dallas tour of homes today. The homes range from 1140 sf to 6800 sf, all are designed with strong mid-century modern mindsets, and all are in very different parts of the city.

Today will be sunny, 68 and very little wind. A perfect day to explore great architecture and great interior design. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I guess we won't be talking about architectural designs for the average person's home.

DD, why would you say that? Confused

I was mistaken. When I first read the first two posts, I thought it would be mostly commercial buildings and million dollar mansions. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
D and I are taking in the AIA Dallas tour of homes today. The homes range from 1140 sf to 6800 sf, all are designed with strong mid-century modern mindsets, and all are in very different parts of the city.

Today will be sunny, 68 and very little wind. A perfect day to explore great architecture and great interior design. Cool


Better than staying in and watching the Cowboys (or the Giants). Spring Training is 3 1/2 months away!
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
D and I are taking in the AIA Dallas tour of homes today. The homes range from 1140 sf to 6800 sf, all are designed with strong mid-century modern mindsets ...

I really like the some of the elements of this style -- especially the clean lines -- for a kitchen and bathroom. Are the homes that you are touring usually mix more than one design style? I've been browsing this website for ideas, but I sometimes can't tell what the rest of the homes look like.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
D and I are taking in the AIA Dallas tour of homes today. The homes range from 1140 sf to 6800 sf, all are designed with strong mid-century modern mindsets ...

I really like the some of the elements of this style -- especially the clean lines -- for a kitchen and bathroom. Are the homes that you are touring usually mix more than one design style? I've been browsing this website for ideas, but I sometimes can't tell what the rest of the homes look like.


DD, every year is completely different.

D just got back from a run. We will head out shortly and I can report back later.

We have been buying for Santa Fe in nothing but mid-century modern so looking for ideas.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
D and I are taking in the AIA Dallas tour of homes today. The homes range from 1140 sf to 6800 sf, all are designed with strong mid-century modern mindsets, and all are in very different parts of the city.

Today will be sunny, 68 and very little wind. A perfect day to explore great architecture and great interior design. Cool


Better than staying in and watching the Cowboys (or the Giants). Spring Training is 3 1/2 months away!


Big Grin
The first structure I thought of after looking up mid-century modern was the Salk Institute (Louis Kahn), a building I have done a lot of work in (great Facilities crew there)...but I might consider the complex 'extreme mid-century modern mindset' Smile
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by wine+art:
strong mid-century modern mindsets

My favourite by a longshot. Would love to tour the case study homes one day.


mangiare,

www.hometourdallas.com

You will notice the womb chair quickly I'm confident. Wink


The only one I can see from the pics on an iphone looks like a knock- off. Could just be on a small screen. Is it possibe to find better pics of the homes?

Which home did you appreciate the most given the mid- century context.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Ed Bowers [i.e. FlWino]:


Work with designers, Architects, builders daily. I also do all project management and CAD.



Ed, are you moving towards any BIM using Revit for 3-D, 4-D or other software from Autodesk?


Still use Arch Desktop 2009. Upgrade of $ 4,500 is not in the cards. Still can get 3D views in 2009.
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by wine+art:
strong mid-century modern mindsets

My favourite by a longshot. Would love to tour the case study homes one day.


mangiare,

www.hometourdallas.com

You will notice the womb chair quickly I'm confident. Wink


The only one I can see from the pics on an iphone looks like a knock- off. Could just be on a small screen. Is it possibe to find better pics of the homes?

Which home did you appreciate the most given the mid- century context.


mangiare,

No more photos, and no photos allowed either.

All the homes showed very well. The jury did a great job vetting, from small homes to larger homes, but nothing too large.

The Kessler Wood was stunning and very modest in size, as was Wyatt Circle 1. The Browning property had a nice feel, but Kessler was our favorite.

We went to dinner after to compare notes, and first on our list was the same... very disappointed in the art overall.

An excellent day. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by wine+art:
strong mid-century modern mindsets

My favourite by a longshot. Would love to tour the case study homes one day.


mangiare,

www.hometourdallas.com

You will notice the womb chair quickly I'm confident. Wink


The only one I can see from the pics on an iphone looks like a knock- off. Could just be on a small screen. Is it possibe to find better pics of the homes?

Which home did you appreciate the most given the mid- century context.


mangiare,

No more photos, and no photos allowed either.

All the homes showed very well. The jury did a great job vetting, from small homes to larger homes, but nothing too large.

The Kessler Wood was stunning and very modest in size, as was Wyatt Circle 1. The Browning property had a nice feel, but Kessler was our favorite.

We went to dinner after to compare notes, and first on our list was the same... very disappointed in the art overall.

An excellent day. Cool


I like some of the modern architecture in homes, they look cool. But with some I wonder how comfortable I would be living in them. Were any of them like that?
ThistlinTom, I get to see many luxury homes in my line of work and I would live in a well done mid-century modern one (not to be confused with modern) all day long.

W&A, it's a real womb chair.
From the limited pictures, I like Browning Lane and Wyatt Circle 1. The use of wood, stone, and glass in Browning Lane adds a lot of texture and warmth to something that could be perceived as cold. Love the table in Wyatt Circle 1- looks familiar Wink
I enjoy mid-century modern, it has an inherent warmth to it that most Deco or International Style homes don’t. I understand Industrial Chic and New Modernism and they can be striking as well but I very much gravitate to homes with a high degree of inviting warmth and comfort. Very few IS-modern homes and pretty much zero PoMo homes gives me that. I think the heavy use of wood in mid-century modern, new modernism, Wright homes etc. gives you that warmth and feeling of “home” instead of “house”.

Aesthetically and comfort wise, I like living in Edwardian and Victorian homes the best. It’s like wearing an ancient, moth eaten sweater that feels great despite the holes. While clean modernism can be more calming, I find Edwardian/Victorian more comforting. I love the perfection of Georgian but it can be stifling.
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
The first structure I thought of after looking up mid-century modern was the Salk Institute (Louis Kahn), a building I have done a lot of work in (great Facilities crew there)...but I might consider the complex 'extreme mid-century modern mindset' Smile


Worked at the Salk Institute for 2 and a half years. Very cool design. I haven't been back since the expansion. I hope they did a good job with the new structure.
quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
The first structure I thought of after looking up mid-century modern was the Salk Institute (Louis Kahn), a building I have done a lot of work in (great Facilities crew there)...but I might consider the complex 'extreme mid-century modern mindset' Smile


Worked at the Salk Institute for 2 and a half years. Very cool design.


The great Louis Kahn. A great building indeed.

The Kimbell in Ft. Worth ( first phase) is also a wonderful Kahn building if you ever visit DFW.
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:
ThistlinTom, I get to see many luxury homes in my line of work and I would live in a well done mid-century modern one (not to be confused with modern) all day long.

W&A, it's a real womb chair. Yes it was. In fact, all their mid-century furniture was bought from certified vintage sales. I noticed the pieces were somewhat to very worn. The architect told me this was the desire of the owners.


From the limited pictures, I like Browning Lane and Wyatt Circle 1. The use of wood, stone, and glass in Browning Lane adds a lot of texture and warmth to something that could be perceived as cold. Love the table in Wyatt Circle 1- looks familiar Wink Very limited photo's as you know, and impossible to get a true feel of scale without visiting each home. but your eye did catch some of the finest choices.
Some very interesting comments about the AIA Dallas home tour. Thanks to all for sharing their insights.

One of the reasons I prefer mid-century modern over modern or contemporary is scale. I often find modern and contemporary to be far more suitable for commercial, museums and public spaces. I find the scale of mid-century modern very conducive for residential.

My opinion. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by GreenDrazi:
I suppose you mid-century (whatever the heck that is) types prefer Rococo over Baroque too.


Rococo burns better so I prefer it.

If I had to live in it, I would go baroque as I would have a little more time of sanity before I lost my mind.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob_Sutherland:
quote:
Originally posted by GreenDrazi:
I suppose you mid-century (whatever the heck that is) types prefer Rococo over Baroque too.


Rococo burns better so I prefer it... we can only hope!

If I had to live in it, I would go baroque as I would have a little more time of sanity before I lost my mind.


Either is what hell looks like to fans of mid-century modern.
I'm not happy with the architect I've been working with. I gave her a budget, she did the work, I paid and now after getting 3 bids, the project is 3x what I told her my budget was. Mulling on how to proceed and how willing I am to have her start over or litigate.
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
I'm not happy with the architect I've been working with. I gave her a budget, she did the work, I paid and now after getting 3 bids, the project is 3x what I told her my budget was. Mulling on how to proceed and how willing I am to have her start over or litigate.


Tanglenet, did you have any meetings with her during the design? If so pay the bill as you knew what was going on, otherwise litigate. Hope you had a contract specifying what your budget was, design style size etc. Maybe she can offer cheaper alternatives. Who were the bidders? Her folks or yours? IMHO she is an idiot!!
quote:
Originally posted by Ed Bowers [i.e. FlWino]:
quote:
Originally posted by tanglenet:
I'm not happy with the architect I've been working with. I gave her a budget, she did the work, I paid and now after getting 3 bids, the project is 3x what I told her my budget was. Mulling on how to proceed and how willing I am to have her start over or litigate.


Tanglenet, did you have any meetings with her during the design? If so pay the bill as you knew what was going on, otherwise litigate. Hope you had a contract specifying what your budget was, design style size etc. Maybe she can offer cheaper alternatives. Who were the bidders? Her folks or yours? IMHO she is an idiot!!


Standard AIA contract. The scope of work was outlined by her but the (my) budget for the cost of the project was not. I don't think she's incompetent, I think she doesn't care if the project was built or not as she was going to be paid upfront for the drawings, submittal for approval, working with the structural engineer, etc.

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