Anyone ever had vin jaune?

quote:
FRUITIÈRE VINICOLE D'ARBOIS VIN JAUNE

Of course. In fact, over the past 5 years or so it's become the trendy thing to have. Sort of like Gruner Veltliner about 15 years ago.

I'm not sure that one is imported to the US right now. There have been a few tastings organized by the regional marketing group in attempts to find importers and a number of the producers have actually been picked up, so the wines from the area are easier to find.

The wines are a little pricy to my thinking. Many would have had to be around $40 or so on the shelf. The ones people are curious about are made from Savagnin and they're done in a manner similar to a fino sherry, but they're more expensive than a good fino and not quite as good. The interest is mostly the geek factor rather than the quality of the finished wine IMO. They're not fortified like sherry is so the alc levels are a little lower, but they're still pretty much up there.
I haven't tried this particular wine but I have had Vin Jaune before and disliked it to such an extent that I couldn't finish the bottle. I used the remainder in a chicken recipe that was indigenous to the region.It tasted like nothing I'd ever had before or since.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
The ones people are curious about are made from Savagnin and they're done in a manner similar to a fino sherry, but they're more expensive than a good fino and not quite as good.


Agreed, I much prefer the fino sherries I've tasted.

I echo the comments of the others Bman. Very oxidative, unique, but not to my liking.
So bman, I just looked thru some notes from 2010 and I tasted seven of that producer's wines and not a vin jaune. That winery is a co-op of some 120 growers - not a bad thing per se, and they're one of the larger producers in the region, but their wines weren't as good as some. At least to me. Their vin de paille was even a bit harsh.

Juravinum is another co-op but I found their wines overall a bit more elegant.

Better yet were some of the family operations, a few of them quite new. De la Borde for example, was started in 2003 and Daniel Dugois in 1983. Rolet and Desire Petit have been around for 80 and 60 years respectively.

Domaine Bourdy OTOH, is one of the oldest wine growing families in France, dating to the late 1400s.

Most are pretty hard to find. Puffney however, seems to be all over in NYC. I'd try one of those. But frankly, I like the Jura dry wines better for the most part.
love vin jaune, but just don't drink it enough. actually, tried a '88 Puffeney Vin Jaune on Saturday that was completely thrilling. amazing complexity and nuance to the palate with lots of orchard fruit, roasted nut flavors and spice.

while they aren't cheap as a genre, they're wildly under priced given their quality.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×