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Hello All -

I'm just wondering if anyone else out there likes Gewürztraminer (in dry and sweet guise)? I really love the rose, grapefruit, spicy elements of this varietal and find that it's a great wine if you're just sitting around reading or watching a movie. Really nice with spicy dishes - back at school, I used to have it with spicy instant noodle (still do today, I confess...) Good QPR suggestions are very welcome...

Best wishes in the new year,

The Economist.
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My wife and I love the stuff! It's perfect with all types of Asian and other spicy food, which we either cook or buy quite often. In fact, I have a bottle in the fridge right now, waiting to accompany a vegetarian dinner of Spiced Black-Eyed Peas with Yogurt and Ginger from the Williams-Sonoma Beans & Rice Cookbook (don't scoff -- it's really good!).

I buy Gewürztraminer by the case from Navarro. All of Navarro's wines are very good to excellent, with high QPRs, and their Gewürztraminers are consistently among the best domestic bottlings avaiable.

Navarro makes two versions of Gewürztraminer, an Estate ($19) and what they call a Cuvee Traditional ($14). Very reasonably priced, especially if you're a member of their Pre-Release Club (about $2 off per bottle) and buy in quantity (an additional 10% off per case, 15% off three or more). And they recently offered $0.01 shipping.

They also make two superb dessert wines from the grape, a Late Harvest with 11% residual sugar and a Cluster Select Late Harvest at 21% residual sugar, and this year they made a sparkling Gewurtz, which I haven't yet tried.
quote:
Originally posted by The Economist:
Hello All -

I'm just wondering if anyone else out there likes Gewürztraminer (in dry and sweet guise)? I really love the rose, grapefruit, spicy elements of this varietal and find that it's a great wine if you're just sitting around reading or watching a movie. Really nice with spicy dishes - back at school, I used to have it with spicy instant noodle (still do today, I confess...) Good QPR suggestions are very welcome...

Best wishes in the new year,

The Economist.


My favorite QPR Gewurztraminer is the Cesconi Traminer from Alto Adige, Italy -- About $18, 91+ wine.
I really like the typical character of Gewürztraminer. Until a few years ago the basic rule for me was Gewürztraminer=Alsace.

But now my favourite area is Alto Aldige. For example the ones from St. Michael Eppan (both the regular and the St. Valentin) and Cantine Terlano (also makes one of the worlds best Sauvignon Blanc IMO).

I find the Gewürztraminer one of the few wines that pair well with Chinese (in particular Cantonese) dishes.
quote:
Originally posted by Jochems:


But now my favourite area is Alto Aldige.


Jochems, I also enjoy Alto Aldige a great deal. I do not feel their wines can stand up to the single vineyard selections of Alsace, but they also do not cost $80+ either.

For me, the best of the best is still Alsace without question, but Alto Aldige are must buy. Smile
There's lots of drinkable Gewurtz being made in different regions, but the best are always from Alsace. Z-H, Weinbach, Mann, Boxler, Trimbach, Deiss, Ostertag, and others produce some great ones. Price has slowly been creeping up for the best, though; while still great wines, they are no longer the bargains they once were. (I guess we can say that about a lot of wines.)
quote:
Originally posted by VT2IT:
Alsacian Guewurz is the just about the only French wine I buy, although I purchase more from it's original home in Alto Adige. The Kofererhof is good but the J. Hofstatter Kolbenhof can give ZH a run for their money.


I did not know that Gewurz originated in the Alto Adige region of Italy. Thanks for teaching me something VT2IT. I'll also have to try the two you mention, although neither are showing any products in the inventory of our monopoly right now.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
There's lots of drinkable Gewurtz being made in different regions, but the best are always from Alsace. Z-H, Weinbach, Mann, Boxler, Trimbach, Deiss, Ostertag, and others produce some great ones. Price has slowly been creeping up for the best, though; while still great wines, they are no longer the bargains they once were. (I guess we can say that about a lot of wines.)


I normally go for The Alsacian or german. However the price is getting up there. One US producer [Hermann Wiemer] makes a good one for about $ 18.00
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
latour67,
I recently got a hold of an '06 Leon Boesch Gewurtztraminer Alsace that was pretty darn tasty with the flavor profile you mentioned.


If that is the one offered by Garagiste at $13.99, I've been looking for an occasion to pop one. Now I'm even more curious.

Someone should mention that they do a good job in Oregon with a riper,richer style of Gewurtz.
Recent ones I've tried are Belle Pente and Sineann. Andrew Rich, I think, is even better.

The big volume producers in Washington put out creditable Gewürztraminer at bargain prices. That includes Chateau Ste. Michelle, Columbia, Covey Run, and Hogue, which are all widely distributed and commonly discounted.
quote:
Originally posted by pape du neuf:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
latour67,
I recently got a hold of an '06 Leon Boesch Gewurtztraminer Alsace that was pretty darn tasty with the flavor profile you mentioned.


If that is the one offered by Garagiste at $13.99, I've been looking for an occasion to pop one. Now I'm even more curious.

Yes, pape du neuf, it is. I have a friend whose wife only drinks dry or slightly off dry whites, so I popped it mainly for her. She kept asking if I had any more. Unfortunately, I only bought 2 bottles and can't get any more. Frown
You guys should check out NZ Gewurztraminer.

Considering NZ Gewurztraminer has taken out more international awards than any other region for the varietal it may be worth checking out. Even the most expensive NZ Gewurztraminer is cheaper than the top Alsace houses.

I am not sure what is available your side of the Pacific so will suggest as many as possible.

My picks
Stonecroft Old Vine (% star wine)
Vinoptima (also does a late harvest which is amazing- 5 star wine)
Dry River (5 star wine)
St Clair Godfrey's Vineyard (4 star wine)
Torlesse (for a cheaper wine- 4 star wine)
Omihi Rd ( 4 star wine)
Revington (4 star wine)
Johanneshoff (5 star wine)
Nobilo Icon (4 star wine)
Villa Maria Ihumtao Single Vineyard Reserve (5 star wine)

Because youa ll do a 100 point system below is the approx values
4 star = 88+
5 star = 94+

The star ratings are an average of Winestate , NZ Cuisine Magasine and Decanter ratings (whom use a twenty point system where only a 19 or 20 qualify for 5 stars)

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