Skip to main content

vs we always inject too. I've found that this is the best way to prepare the turkey:

The night before: Put wrapped bird in fryer, fill with water to submerge the turkey. Remove turkey and note water level. This is the level at which you will fill with oil when frying. After opening turkey and removing giblets, lift up the skin (do not tear or puncture) and inject all over with marinade (we use either Chef Williams' Creole Butter or Garlic and Herb). Make sure you inject all over the breast, wing, leg. Use about 1 oz. of marinade per pound of turkey. Once done injecting, pour remaining marinade over skin and rub around to coat entire bird. Refridegrate overnight.

The day of: Take the bird out 30 mins prior to frying and place upright on the stand (to let any loose marinade drain). Preheat the PEANUT oil to 350F (it takes about 30 mins, ambient temp depending). Once preheated, *slowly* lower the bird into oil. (I use a "bouncing motion": lower in a few inches, hold, pull up, lower in a few more inches, etc.). During the time, the oil will drop. Get the heat back to 350 ASAP. Fry for 3 mins per pound. AFter cooking time is done, remove to a cutting board, tent with foil and let sit for 15 mins. Cut and serve!!!

Man, I can't wait until Thursday!!!
I'm doing a secondary turkey, to complement the main one my sister-in-law's doing in the oven.

Mine is [going to be] brined Weds noon to Thursday am, then smoked outside in my weber kettle - it kicks the oven bird's a$$.

I just use american white turkey - fresh, not frozen. The group we're eating with wouldn't care about an artisanal heirloom turkey.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
[QUOTE]By the way, every Thanksgiving there are about 20 house fires in the US from deep frying turkeys.


Yes, I'm always amazed by this statistic.

Rule #1 - After a hurricane, don't put your generator inside the house

Rule #2 - Don't put the turkey fryer inside the house or even inside the garage

Rule #3 - If there is an 80% chance of rain on Thanksgiving day, just don't plan of frying the turket since it may make one disobey Rule #2
quote:
Originally posted by gator1993:
Rule #3 - If there is an 80% chance of rain on Thanksgiving day...
Yeah, last year I had to stand out in the pouring rain watching over the fryer. Not only that, but it was windy, so I had to make sure the flame didn't blow out. Thanks goodness this year's forecast is sunny and cold. We'll even have a fire going in the fireplace. Perfect!!!
Thanks for the tips, my friend also said to wrap the ends of the legs and wings with aluminum foil to prevent burning.
quote:
Originally posted by mwagner7700:
vs we always inject too. I've found that this is the best way to prepare the turkey:

The night before: Put wrapped bird in fryer, fill with water to submerge the turkey. Remove turkey and note water level. This is the level at which you will fill with oil when frying. After opening turkey and removing giblets, lift up the skin (do not tear or puncture) and inject all over with marinade (we use either Chef Williams' Creole Butter or Garlic and Herb). Make sure you inject all over the breast, wing, leg. Use about 1 oz. of marinade per pound of turkey. Once done injecting, pour remaining marinade over skin and rub around to coat entire bird. Refridegrate overnight.

The day of: Take the bird out 30 mins prior to frying and place upright on the stand (to let any loose marinade drain). Preheat the PEANUT oil to 350F (it takes about 30 mins, ambient temp depending). Once preheated, *slowly* lower the bird into oil. (I use a "bouncing motion": lower in a few inches, hold, pull up, lower in a few more inches, etc.). During the time, the oil will drop. Get the heat back to 350 ASAP. Fry for 3 mins per pound. AFter cooking time is done, remove to a cutting board, tent with foil and let sit for 15 mins. Cut and serve!!!

Man, I can't wait until Thursday!!!
No, Bella. You put the frozen turkey in the hot oil, but use a ten foot extension to drop the bird into the fryer so you don't burn yourself. Use a frozen Peking duck for a real treat.

You know, you complain when people make fun of the abject stupidity of your posts, then continue in the same vein. As difficult as it may be for you, try to think once in a while before hitting the "Post Now" button.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I've never had a fried turkey, but after reading this thread I am drooling over the thought.


Rothko, a fried turkey is great. If you are a white meat lover like me, it enables one to enjoy moist white meat, unlike most roasted turkey's that most people cook where the breast gets so dry that it requires 3 quarts of water after each bite to recover from.
The one downside to frying a turkey is the gravy. In previous year's either us, or our parents have also made a roasted turkey... so the gravy came from those drippings. However, this year we're only frying the turkey, hence no pan drippings.

I plan on browning the giblets in a half of stick of butter, then adding 1 chopped carrot, celery stalk, and onion. Sautee them until softened. Next I'll add 6 cups of water and 3 cups of low-sodium chicken broth and reduce to the stock is about 4 cups. Since I'll do this the night before, I'll put the strained stock in the fridge. The day of, I'll melt 5 tablespoons of butter and mix in 5 tablespoons of flour to make a roux. I'll slowly add the stock, and that will be the gravy. Hopefully it'll work... but I'm sure the flavor will suffer from lack of pan drippings and bits. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by kumazam:
you cook anything with this method it'll taste good... uhhhh, it's DEEP fried Roll Eyes


That's what I'm talking about. I'll deep fry just about anything. At the State Fair this year I tried deep-fried Twinkies. Never much of a Twinkie fan, but deep-fried, mmmmmmmmmm good. They batter them then fry. I even deep-fry my pancakes when I make them. Nice and crunchy.
quote:
That's what I'm talking about. I'll deep fry just about anything. At the State Fair this year I tried deep-fried Twinkies. Never much of a Twinkie fan, but deep-fried, mmmmmmmmmm good. They batter them then fry. I even deep-fry my pancakes when I make them. Nice and crunchy.


Holy cholesterol Batman!

I got chest pains reading this.
quote:
Originally posted by kumazam:
that "King of the Hill" episode, the house fire eventually starts when they get the idea to deep fry a can of beer Big Grin


Big Grin Big Grin Ya, I remember that episode, Dale is classic.

Hunter, a few years back my old boss told me to go have my cholesterol checked because he saw me bring in lunch every day; usually 3 Wendy's hamburgers, or a couple deep-fried chicken sandwiches, or something comparable. I did, he just about dropped when I told him it was 154. You've got to like good genes. All my grandparents have lived into their 90's. My grandma turns 100 this next birthday. Of course, they weren't eating deep-fried turkeys and Twinkies every other day. Big Grin
I've done it twice and the results were outstanding. I am not much of a fan of turkey but this when done right is truely wonderful. The meat remains moist and tasty, even the white meat and the skin is incredible. It is extremely dangerous however. I fried mine at 375 degrees. A 13 pound bird took 55 minutes. Here are a few safety tips. Have a fire extinguisher ready. Don't fry near your house. No pets or children near it. Watch it constantly and no alcohol before or during cooking. Turn the gas off when lowering or raising the turkey so that any oil dripped over the side doesn't ignite. Work with another person to help you raise and lower it without standing directly over it so that you don't get scalded if it splatters. Make the turkey as dry as possible before starting. Lower slowly, when you first start, every bit of moisture in the bird will turn to steam and the oil will bubble vigorously. If you see that you have too much oil, stop. If it drips over the side it will ignite. You can re-use the oil but you must raise the temperature 25 degrees the second time to compensate for the impurities from the first cooking. The oil is expensive, about $27 at Costco. Good luck. BTW, I'm roasting in the oven this year. It's too cold outside.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×