I just can't seem to get my wife to enjoy a glass of wine with me. It seems as though I've tried them all and every time I think she's going to like one, she doesn't. The closest I can get to her drinking a glass of wine with me is when I mix up a pitcher of Sangria. She likes it because it’s sweet. With Valentine's Day around the corner, I'd like to bring home something sweet that she will like instead of the same old Sangria (not that there's anything wrong with it). Any suggestions?
Original Post
Pour her a glass of a nice Loire sweetie like a Delesvaux SGN or a Baumard QdC. If she doesn't care for these, ditch her. Cool

PH
Sergio,

As much as i hate to agree with Board-O on anything I would highly recommend a german Reisling, the freshness and the high acidity, low alcohal and the residual sugars normally appeal to less agreeable tastes in wine, especially if sweetness is a requirement, depending on your budget i often buy any of the Markus Molitor reislings for my wife who is in a similar situation, also you may want to try a young Sauterne
I have yet to find people who don't appreciate at least the occasional sauternes... except for those odd people who end up being "allergic" to alcohol. K&L has a great deal right now on 2007 Doisy Vedrines halves for under $20.
Definitely agree with the German Riesling or the Sauternes recs. Another relatively inexpensive option might be Moscato d'Asti, as sparklers on Valentine's Day seem like a good match IMO.
+1 on the Sauternes and its next door neighbor, Barsac. Pair it with some Creme Brulee or cheesecake. A decent half bottle will set you back about $25. Look for something from 2005, 2003, or if you find one, a 2001.

Q. for the Riesling lovers: Any chance Sergio would bring home one with that acquired-taste petrol profile? Or, not an issue with anything younger? First time my wife tried one in the 15-year-old range, she headed right for the spit bucket.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Q. for the Riesling lovers: Any chance Sergio would bring home one with that acquired-taste petrol profile? Or, not an issue with anything younger? First time my wife tried one in the 15-year-old range, she headed right for the spit bucket.

At most a hint of petrol in a young Riesling. The biggest concern with a youngun' (a dead certainty with JJ Prum's) is sulfur, which will blow off with a little time open.

But why did your wife head for a spit bucket? The petrol characteristic is an aroma. If she got past the first sniff, I don't understand why a taste would have been objectionable.
quote:

But why did your wife head for a spit bucket?


Because she didn't get past the first sniff/taste: Gasoline mixed with WD-40. It wasn't really something I wanted much more than a sip of myself, as I'd forgotten a clothes pin for my nose.

Sergio, call me silly, but for a novice wine drinker, a wine that has any chance of yielding scents of farts (sulphur) or a gas station (petrol) is a pass in my book, especially if Valentine's Day is involved. Wink
Sergio - all of the wines mentioned are nice. But you may not need to go even that far. Find a nice sweet Muscat - get something from Rivesaltes - they're FAR better than the price you'll likely pay. Or even a Moscato d'Asti.

The Muscats have a flowery, peachy aroma that women tend to like. A lot. I've shown those to many people who say they don't like wine but when they try those wines, they're OK. Serve them slightly chilled.

If you can find one, get a Brachetto d'Asti. It's a slightly fizzy wine that smells like strawberries and is usually only around 8 to 10% alcohol.

I don't know your wife but many people object to the alcohol levels of Ports, sherries, Madeiras, Banyuls, etc., because they can seem like cough medicine, and some people don't like the nose of botrytized wines. OTOH, more often than not, those same people like the friendly and beautiful nose of the sweet Muscats.
+1 on the Moscato d'Asti. Something different would be a Brachetto d'Acqui. From the same region as a MdA but it is a sweet red sparkler...
Ummm

Maybe buy a bottle of something you like, and sneak a teaspoon of sugar into the glass you pour for her?

Over time, start decreasing the amount of sugar--grain by grain, until she's drinking dry!

Worth a shot??
Great idea.

But why use wine you like? Use wine you don't like, just leave the bottle on the counter. Make a simple sugar syrup and keep it in the fridge. Every time the wife wants wine, pour her a glass with a little syrup.

She's happy, you're happy, there's peace and love in the home.
The following Aussies will do the trick at a great price. Plus available everywhere:

Campbell's Muscat or Tokay
Buller's Muscat
Chambers' Muscat
Yalumba's Museum Tawny

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