Skip to main content

Since wine is officially a healthy food, Wink, I'm sure there are other fitness minded folks out there. Me, I've been a cyclist for about 20 years, mostly to keep the ticker in good shape, but I did race for a season in my early 20s.

I have two rigs right now: Steel Landshark with carbon fork, Dura Ace 10sp, Cinelli cockpit and American Classic hoops. The other bike, my rain rig, is a Bianchi Pista fixed gear (no hand brake thank you) that's a blast to ride.

I generally put 3,000 miles on in an average year.

Anybody else? And, any opinions about today's Paris-Roubaix?

Cheers,
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Not a cyclist but married to one so I've come to love it. Cycling season is coming up so I'm getting ready travel to way too many tiny towns for criteriums and every Thursday to the 'burbs for track. I stay fit by finding whatever gym happens to be in our hotel and walking the course when I get nervous.

We're keeping an eye on Paris-Roubaix right now and there's a huge breakaway.

p.s.-did you see who won? I'm pretty pleased with result.
Last edited by een
quote:
Originally posted by Een:
p.s.-did you see who won? I'm pretty pleased with result.

Stuart O’Grady (CSC) won. This was the 2nd year in a row that CSC won - Fabian Cancellara won last year. I was hoping that Tom Boonen would have won this year but he’s having a tough spring classics season and has been experiencing a lot of back pain lately. It’s too bad that George Hincapie had an early season injury since he always thrives at the “Hell of the North.” By the way, this is the first year in the history of the race that an Aussie has won, or placed in the top 3, in the history of Paris-Roubaix.
Last edited by altaholic
Indybob I do a little cycling, like you, to keep the ticker in shape. I have an eight or nine year old Cannondale H300. It's getting old but I take pretty good care of it.

I'm lucky. I live three blocks away from a trail system called the Prairie Path. Miles and miles of crushed stone with trees, ponds, corn fields and a river on both sides. No motorized traffic. It also hooks up with the Great Western Trail which offers more of the same. One branch of the trail goes right by my shop so I can cycle to and from work if weather permits.
GAAAAHHHHH! I should have said No Spoilers, as I'm taping Paris R. right now at home. Oh well, good for Stewie, I'll pop a cold one later to root for the others on the podium.

As far as the Tour/Giro. It'd be nice to see Basso get his share, but it's too early to see who is on form. Wouldn't it be a hoot if The Chicken (Rasmussen) has a comeback from surgery to take one of them.


The crappy weather the past week has made it tough to get out. Sigh.
Yup, another cyclist here. I ride a 15 year old Motobecane. It has always served me right, and I've taken good care of it, but it's getting weary now. I'm saving for a new one.

Didn't watch Paris Roubaix yesterday, because it was lovely weather and LadyR and I decided it was much better to do a little cycling ourselves. Nothing too fanatic, 50 kilometers, but a very nice tour. Did watch Gent Wevelgem though last wednesday, some very nasty crashes there... Frown

In one of the coming years, the Tour de France will start in my home town Utrecht. Count on me being in the crowd!
Ok, I'll jump in also. I've been riding and racing for 20 years or so. I mainly ride a Specialize with Dura-ace, but I still have my first racing bike from college. It is a circa 1970 Italian Morelli with campy record. Brake cables out, friction shifting, nothing sealed. Good stuff. I break her out every once in a while for tool around rides.

I don't race any crits anymore, but will do an occasional road race and adventure races.

p.s. not my first choice, but it was nice to see S.O. wine the Hell of the North. - and in fine fashion.
I have two bikes but haven't been on them for far too long. One is a good road bike and the other is a tri-bike. I will have to go and have a look at what they are. The road bike I've had for twenty years and it wasn't new then, the tri is a lot newer but was my Father's. I want to do sprint triathlons but need to get out on the road, both on foot and wheel, and in the pool first. I have no intention of doing a full triathlon but I have been told that once I get started it will only be a matter of time before I succumb.

I have seen Ronald's bike and it is at least twenty years old. Oh yes, he has another one as well, allegedly.
I used to ride in college almost every day, but haven't really been into it since I got hit by a car in San Diego (about 20 years ago). I have an old Club Fuji which still is a great road bike. It's 62cm and very stiff frame, which I need. I also have a Cannondale F700 mountain bike that's about 11 years old. Since the kids came along, I just don't get out with it much.
I use a Cannondale F500 Mtn bike (c/w saddle bags) for tooling around the mirade of trails and off-roads here (and back-forth from gym and grocery stores)...but, mostly I ride my Cannondale Si2000 CAD7 (Mavic rims) super-light road bike for exercise.
Mostly shorter (45min-1hr) anaerobic rides 2 to 4 times a week with some hill climbing...no sightseeing here...I push myself hard.
Frankly I find long (aerobic) rides just for exercise boring as crap!...my wife and I do enjoy 'Touring'.
quote:
Originally posted by Een:
Indy, I'm sorry the results were ruined for you. It's too hard for me to wait so I end up reading the live reports on cyclingnews.

The weather up here has been horrible for riding but M. is doing four hour plus training rides several days a week. His first race is at the end of the month.


Wow,

Sounds like Mr. Een is a stud. My hat's off to him if he's putting those kind of hours in near Lake Michigan, in this Spring. Hope he does well in his upcoming races.

And, nice to see so many bikers out there in wineland. And, those classic bikes are just awesome. 1970s Morelli, classic Motobecane, nice rigs, and that steel rides like a dream doesn't it?
Indybob, thanks. He's pretty serious and had the opportunity to race in Europe as a teen but lost interest. He rides Cat 3 now, which is all he wants to deal with given work and life demands.

You'll have to make it up to Chicago in August for National Criterium Championships. It's just a lot of fun to walk around the course. People are having parties everywhere and it's not abnormal for people to be grilling and offering random strangers beer and barbecue (especially day 2 when the pros race).
I still ride and still race. I love biking and can talk about it for hours. The races I compete in now are mostly friendly crits on hot summer nights and some off-road stuff. My hours in the saddle are starting to pick up a bit but I’ve been in my cold weather gear for too long this season. Here are my rigs that I have too much money invested in:

1992 Bridgestone RB-1. This was my first serious racing bike that I got while in high school. I love this bike because it was made with the Ishiwata quad-butted tubing and has a LONG top tube and slack (72.5) seat angle that makes it ride like a stretch limo. This bike has seen many crits and has been on more than a few centuries. This summer I’m going to have the frame stripped and repainted in the original colors and I’m having the original decals applied. Then I’m going to update the components to new Ultegra and an FSA compact crank. I haven’t decided on the wheels yet.

The bike that gets most of mileage now is a Independent Fabrication Crown Jewel with Dura Ace (39/53 in the front and 11/23 in the rear though my knees are beginning to beg for an 11/26 cluster or a 34/50 compact), Reynolds carbon fork, SRAM Force brakes, Speedplay X2 SS pedals, Cosmic Carbone wheels and Torelli Torino clinchers. I’ll probably eventually sell this bike because I am on the waiting list for a Richard Sachs custom built frame but the wait time is now around 2 years with about a 6 month wait on the build. If I get tired of waiting for the Sachs I am going to get a custom built Waterford.

My primary race bike is a Look 585 Ultra that is built similarly to my IF but I have a set of American Classic Mag CX-Rays that I most often use with this bike though I do use the Carbones at times.

Kona Kula Primo MTB – My primary off-road rig.

Trek 930 MTB built with TrueTemper OX. This is an old school hard tail with no front suspension. One of the best bikes I ever owned and the only bike I ever bought that cost less than $400. This bike still gets a lot of off road miles despite not having any suspension. It’s like my favorite pair of blue jeans.

The only other pending bike purchase outside of the Sachs will be a Santana tandem at some point. My wife really wants one and one of my daughters has been bitten by the bike bug and wants to start riding with me as well.
Last edited by altaholic
Yes, G. Watson is THE cycling photographer of record. An Ansel Adams of the sport.

Alta, you'd be a good person to ask: My primary rig is a Landshark, as you know; custom steel, carbon fork, you know the way these things ride, like butter. I've been interested in carbon for a while, and am looking at going with a nice carbon rig somewhere down the road, Look, Orbea, something like that.

Since you have experience with both, how do the rides of your Carbon and Steel rides compare?

Also, how do you like the Cosmic Carbones vs. the AClassic mags? I'm a big dude, 6'3" 200#, so tend to flex a lot of parts. I'm having good luck with the AC 420s right now, but buy a new set every two years or so.
Alta, I think the LOOK frames are awfully attractive.

Indy, the carbon is stiffer and lighter but more expensive. The steel can be more comfortable in the way that it absorbs road shock. Steel doesn't break as often as the carbon. If you're racing and might crash, that could be a concern.

M. rides an Independent Fabrication (steel) roadbike, an aluminum Duratech track bike and a steel Bianchi San Jose cyclocross.
quote:
Originally posted by Een:
Alta, I think the LOOK frames are awfully attractive.

Indy, the carbon is stiffer and lighter but more expensive. The steel can be more comfortable in the way that it absorbs road shock. Steel doesn't break as often as the carbon. If you're racing and might crash, that could be a concern.

M. rides an Independent Fabrication (steel) roadbike, an aluminum Duratech track bike and a steel Bianchi San Jose cyclocross.


Yes, the Look frames are amazing physical specimens in terms of looks. Ridley, Orbea, Colnago, among many others, make some great looking Carbon rigs.

As far as stiffness, I agree with you, to a point. A good custom frame builder takes the needs of their client in consideration when building a bike. I'm a big guy, and the steel frame I had built for me is stiff as hell. I've never gotten any flex out of the bottom bracket whatsoever (big ring/uphill, whatever). But, like you said Een, it is heavier than carbon, but I don't worry about a pound or two (I can lose it off my arse if I'm worried about that).
Custom frames - oh yes.

When I was a kid, the city that I live in (Coventry) was well known for its frame-builders. Within easy cycling, even walking distance of my house there were four: John Atkins, Tom Bromwich, Pollard and Stokes. Sadly, none of them are still trading in the same way. John Atkins has retired to the sea and sold the shops in his name, all the others are gone.

Coventry's industrial history was built on transport - cycles, motor-cycles, cars, tanks and taxis (that sound like tanks). Very little remains of any of them with Jaguar and Peugeot closing their plants in the last year - sad.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Alta, you'd be a good person to ask: My primary rig is a Landshark, as you know; custom steel, carbon fork, you know the way these things ride, like butter. I've been interested in carbon for a while, and am looking at going with a nice carbon rig somewhere down the road, Look, Orbea, something like that.

Indy, the Landshark is a great bike. A teammate of mine several years ago rode one and it really had a wild, but attractive, paint job. As far as the ride quality of steel vs. carbon, I still prefer steel. As you probably know, steel WILL flex but I am not opposed to that if I am only out cruising. If I had to pick a bike to ride a century on it would definitely be made of steel. That being said, I would prefer to race carbon or aluminum because of the lack of flex. I am built like a sprinter and when I’m torquing on the pedals in a crit I don’t want the frame to talk back to me. The cost of this, however, is comfort. I do think that carbon frames have come a long way in terms of comfort though. I am not that familiar with Orbea aside from the fact that Euskaltel rides them, they are made in the Basque, and they have relatively short top tubes. They are attractive bikes and appear to be well made. However, I do like a long top tube on my frames because I have a relatively long torso.

If you are serious about a carbon frame you should also look at a Time and Pinarello F 4:13 or 3:13 as they are outstanding bikes but are pricey. A nicely equipped bike of either brand will set you back $7000 to $10,000 which is in the same ballpark as my carbon Look. Also, do not rule out some of the domestically built carbon bikes. Cannondale, Specialized, and Trek are all making some nice carbon frames now. As a matter of fact Tom Boonen and the Quickstep team are riding Specialized Carbon TarmacSLs this season (Boonen uses 177.5 crank arms!!!!). Specialized has had some issues accommodating Boonen’s preference for a long top tube but they are making a custom mold for a carbon frame that will address this – a first for Specialized. The other domestic company you may want to consider for a carbon ride is Leopard Cycles. I’ve heard good things about the CL1 but at the low price they are asking for these bikes you can bet your a$$ that the frames are not made in the States.

As I said earlier, I am a big fan of steel and I know that you are well aware of the virtues of this material because of your experience on the Landshark. If I didn’t race, I probably would not ride any bike other than steel, with the possible exception of titanium. Since I’m more of the sprinter mentality as a cyclist, I can flex the hell out of a bottom bracket and, if I’m not racing, I really don’t care. If you are really itching for a new steed, do not rule out a steel Waterford, Richard Sachs, or IF. I love my IF and will have to think long and hard before I part with it. IF also makes some excellent hybrid frames – carbon/steel, carbon/titanium. If you decide that you might want a Sachs get on the waiting list NOW. The wait is probably longer than the wait for KB Pinot.

Going back to your original question about ride quality, what does bother me slightly about the ride of carbon is the relative “dead” feel that it possesses when it is compared to steel or titanium. I prefer my ride to be a bit livelier. Also, aluminum can feel the same way sometimes with the “dead” feel.

By the way, the Look is a great bike and there are models with long top tubes if that is your preference.

Sorry for the long message but I hope it is helpful.
Alta,

No worries about the long post, some good info. I am a long torso person, so that would be a consideration if/when I go with a carbon ride. That said, I love the way that steel feels. I remember Armstrong complaining several years back about the deadness of his Trek rigs, and it's interesting to know that that sentiment is similar even in the newer rides, such as your 585.

The IF, waterfords and Sachs are magnificent bikes, but am more than happy with my 'Shark, which is of similar quality.

Have you done any of the mega one day rides? I've done the RAIN (ride across Indiana-160miles) before and am gearing up for it again this summer.

Cheers,
indy, You asked about wheels and I forgot to give my impressions of what I am using. As long as you are using AC spokes with the A. Classics, your weight should be fine. The 420 is a fine wheel and I’m surprised you need to replace them that often. As far as the Carbones vs. Mag CX-Rays, I believe that the Mags are a little better as a racing wheel as I feel better acceleration when using them. I feel that the Mavics might be more durable than the Mags although most manufacturers of Mags, A. Classic included, claim otherwise. Overall, for wheels, I don’t think you’ll go wrong with just about anything from Mavic or A. Classic.

FYI, A. Classic has a weight limit guide on their website.

quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Have you done any of the mega one day rides? I've done the RAIN (ride across Indiana-160miles) before and am gearing up for it again this summer.

In the past, I have participated in the Tour of the Scioto River Valley, aka TOSRV, which goes from Columbus to Portsmouth on Saturday and the reverse on Sunday – 210 miles total in 2 days. This year the event is on May 12th-13th and is always held on Mother’s Day weekend. For some reason, the weather that weekend is nasty more often than not. The last time I rode in this event, it was cold and rainy for the entire Saturday ride. It is one of the largest & oldest events of this nature and draws about 3000 riders. It is very well organized and has well spaced stops with some pretty good food. It’s always a good training ride and I am tentatively planning on doing it this year. At the finish area on Saturday there is a drive through on the other side of the Scioto River and many of the riders hang out and watch the other come in while drinking beer. It doesn’t take many beers after riding that many miles to feel a bit tipsy. When I’ve done the ride in the past, I stay with someone on Saturday night that lives in Portsmouth. It’s about another 3 mile ride from the finish area so I do need to be a bit careful about how much I consume. I was hoping that my wife and I could do TOSRV together this year on a tandem with our oldest daughter on one of the trailer bikes that Burley makes but that will have to wait until next year.
Alta,

Nah, I don't necc. need to replace them that often, just like to get a new set every couple of years. I don't go gung ho, and generally stick under a grand, although that's getting tough to do. Last set I bought, the 420s, I thought I'd save some money and ended up with some crappy ones on ebay. The rims and hubs were genuine, but they were built overseas and rode like Ass with a side of Ass (used with permission). Had the LBS rebuild them for about 100 bucks, and they ride wonderfully now.
Yes, the Little 500. Those links are great Alta. They used to ride something called a Roadmaster.

I've seen it several times from up close, but won't be able to go this year. All I have to say is Go Team Major Taylor!

The Father at the local Catholic Church does a "blessing of the bikes" the Sunday before the ride.

There's another Bloomington event you might be thinking of called the Hilly Hundred, which IMHO should be called the Not-so-Hilly Double 50s (100 miles riden over two days).
Read the first story. This is not good news for Ivan Basso and doesn't bode well for my prediction that he would win the ’07 TdF. Cycling is about the only sport that I know of that the athletes are guilty until proven innocent. If the same set of rules applied to Barry Bonds, Hammerin’ Hank’s record would be sure to remain intact. If Basso can’t ride in the TdF I’ll put my money on Alexandre Vinokourov, Alejandro Valverde, or Damiano Cunego. Tom Danielson could be a darkhorse.
I was an avid cyclist until back surgery in 1990 cut serious participation in that sport out of my life. I still managed to enter a few century "tours" but my last one was the 1992 Whicita Falls Hotter than Hell Hundred.

After that, I sort of had to hang up my clips except for infrequent rides.

Back then TdF was actually a sport. Now it is a soap opera. Thanks to Greg Lemond and recently Lance Armstrong, how can that event ever gain the elite position it had as a European event.
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
how can that event ever gain the elite position it had as a European event.


So sorry to hear about the back problems EG. That definately sucks. From one back pain sufferer to another: Best of Luck!

But, to address your question: When the Euros figure out how to beat the Americans. Hmmmm, the majority of the past 21 champions have been Americans.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×