Hi all.

First, let me start by saying that I enjoy wine, but am not a student of the drink. I don't know the fancy terms and most often tend to enjoy $10-$15 bottles of white.

That being said, I've had the occasion now, twice, to enjoy a bottle of Caymus cab that was absolutely outstanding. This particular bottle was from 2009. All I can describe it as is drinking liquid gold - tasty and smooth, my perfect combo. In fact, this was on Thanksgiving and I can't stop thinking about how good it was.

Is there anything you can suggest that may be in the $20-$25/bottle range that would be remotely similar?

Thanks!
Original Post
There are not a lot of California Cabs out there of this quality which can be obtained for $20-25. The quality starts to suffer.

I will say that in a good vintage, The Robert Mondavi Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon is pretty close. Generally obtainable for $25+, and in a good year can be quite good. However, overall it is made in a similar style each year.

Now that you know that $65-70 will get you something like Caymus, you are probably wondering what $100 might get you?
quote:
Originally posted by Wine doc:
Now that you know that $65-70 will get you something like Caymus, you are probably wondering what $100 might get you?

Big Grin

I will also add this. People will suggest a number of wines in the $20-$25 range. You go out and buy 1 or 2 of them and find that you don't really like it. At this point, you've already spent $50. Another $10-$15 would have gotten you a bottle that you know you'll like.
That leads to the value of attending tastings when offered at retailers.
I was poured a Caravan, second label of Darioush, at a local tasting. Not under $25, but fits the smooth rich profile the OP is looking for. I'm not a fan of the style, but all tastings give reference points.

Better yet, join a group that does blind tastings. With the right group and intelligent selection, you can sort out preferences quickly, independent of price and name recognition.
I'm going to add to the bandwagon slightly. There really isn't anything in the $20-$25 range you are likely to enjoy as much. HOWEVER, at $40-$45 you can find a recent vintage of Chappellet Signature. That you might enjoy more than the Caymus. Lewelling can be a fun, easy CA Cab when young. Those should be $45-$50.

In your price range I seem to recall people enjoying Chateau Ste Michelle Cabernet Canoe Ridge, but its been a while. Also, Sequoia Grove Cabernet can be quite pleasant. But neither of these are going to be at the quality you are looking for.
These guys nailed it. $20-25 is a tough price point for quality domestic cabs; not impossible, just tough.

Here's a few that are decent:

- Beringer Knights Valley (Especially '10)

- Justin Cab

- Arrowood Cab

- Freemark Abbey Cab

* Note that these won't touch Caymus in terms of quality.

When & if your wine hobby drifts to Spain, Italy, or the Southern Rhone, I find a ton of better QPR wines in the $20-30 range. In the mean time, get out to some local tastings if they're available.

Cheers, & welcome.
Thanks for all of the thoughts and comments.

Good idea on the the local tastings. Like I said, I don't know alot of wine, and less about reds, so most of the time I'm at the mercy of whatever we end up ordering. I did come across a Tikal Malbec and I really enjoyed, so I've managed to pick that up once or twice and have enjoyed it. But it wasn't the Caymus.

I can't imagine it gets better, but yeah, I guess I'm curious to see what $100 gets you now.

At $75 a bottle, this isn't something I can purchase a whole lot. Mostly maybe for Christmas and other special occasions. And I don't think I'm to the point yet where I can feel 100% comfortable to go spend $75 and then turn around and drink it. But maybe that comes with time and experience.
quote:
When & if your wine hobby drifts to Spain, Italy, or the Southern Rhone, I find a ton of better QPR wines in the $20-30 range. In the mean time, get out to some local tastings if their they're available.


(Sorry, pet peeve Wink .)

Oh, absolutely true. heckofagator, my comment, and those of the others' is about the Cabernet grape from CA or else in that style (The Chateau Ste Michelle I mentioned is from Washington State).

Frankly, I've had several $30 Cru Beaujolais that I think are wholly better wines, in every way, than Caymus. But, that is a very very different style of wine.
quote:
At $75 a bottle, this isn't something I can purchase a whole lot...


heeckofagator,

Just for clarification of my earlier posts. I don't think you are actually looking at $75/bottle to get quality or taste profile similar to Caymus in CA / CA-style Cabernet. But depending upon what is available to you, you are almost certainly looking at about $45 minimum and that is only if you can find the right wine at the right price. Frown
Well, you've got me interested...

I'm not stuck on the Cab - I only said that cause I knew that's what the Caymus was. In fact, I'm not sure I could tell the differences between all of them. With time, I suppose....

But yeah, any other (fairly easy to obtain) $20-$30 bottles from different regions? I'm all ears.
$45 is better than $75, all else being equal Wink

Any specific recommendations?

quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:

heeckofagator,

Just for clarification of my earlier posts. I don't think you are actually looking at $75/bottle to get quality or taste profile similar to Caymus in CA / CA-style Cabernet. But depending upon what is available to you, you are almost certainly looking at about $45 minimum and that is only if you can find the right wine at the right price. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
When & if your wine hobby drifts to Spain, Italy, or the Southern Rhone, I find a ton of better QPR wines in the $20-30 range. In the mean time, get out to some local tastings if their they're available.


(Sorry, pet peeve Wink .)



What are you talking about?! Devilish
I'd second the Mondavi for being a consistently good Napa cab for 30 bucks.

Usually in that price range I don't look to Napa. There's some excellent ones you might enjoy from Chile though, which is my fallback for great value Cabs. Something like Concha Y Toro's Marques de Casa Concha (a favorite of mine for 18 or 20 dollars) and the Montes Alpha.

And if you liked that Malbec try the Tilia Malbec and Cabernet. Only about 10 bucks and both excellent from Argentina.
I just looked up the Beringer Knights and saw this at Total Wine.

"Wine Advocate - Knights Valley, CA- "Firm tannins support an expressive core of dark red fruit, grilled herbs, asphalt and savory herbs, all of which come to life in a vibrant Cabernet Sauvignon long on personality and character. This is a serious wine for the money."

ASPALT?!??!?!? Is that an acquired taste? Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
If your wine budget is only $60 per month, I'd rather drink one bottle per month versus drinking a $15 bottle each week.


I'm the opposite. I'd rather a nice 15 - 20 dollar bottle once a week than a 60 dollar bottle if that was my budget. I honestly don't find a huge difference in a good 90-91pt/$20 dollar cab vs a 92-93/60 dollar bottle. Not like one is being choked down and the other is mind blowing. Plus the more often one drinks the more different wines you can try (obviously) and see what you like if you're new to the sport. If you're talking say an $80 - $100+ bottle that's usually where I start finding something special that would be worth missing out on a very nice weekly bottle for under 20 bucks. But I'd much rather a 50 dollar bottle once a week than a 7 dollar bottle every day Ack !

But if you're checking out the Beringer heckofagator try the Napa bottling too. More ripe and bold than the KV. And if you can find the Mondavi Oakville on sale for 40 bucks or so that's a great one to grab also for about half what you can usually grab a Caymus for.
quote:
Originally posted by heckofagator:
$45 is better than $75, all else being equal Wink

Any specific recommendations?

Chappellet Signature (easy #1)
Lewelling (for the "lush" factor you may have been describing)


quote:
Originally posted by Icewino:
I honestly don't find a huge difference in a good 90-91pt/$20 dollar cab vs a 92-93/60 dollar bottle. Not like one is being choked down and the other is mind blowing.


I get what you are saying but I never found CA Cab to be particularly pleasurable at the lower levels, and certainly won't provide the same experience Caymus did. Personally, if I want to drink something from the U.S., I get far more pleasure out of a $9/750ml Allagash Grand Cru or Trippel than I do out of any $20 CA Cabs.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by heckofagator:
$45 is better than $75, all else being equal Wink

Any specific recommendations?

Chappellet Signature (easy #1)
Lewelling (for the "lush" factor you may have been describing)


quote:
Originally posted by Icewino:
I honestly don't find a huge difference in a good 90-91pt/$20 dollar cab vs a 92-93/60 dollar bottle. Not like one is being choked down and the other is mind blowing.


I get what you are saying but I never found CA Cab to be particularly pleasurable at the lower levels, and certainly won't provide the same experience Caymus did. Personally, if I want to drink something from the U.S., I get far more pleasure out of a $9/750ml Allagash Grand Cru or Trippel than I do out of any $20 CA Cabs.


Agreed if you're limiting it to lower price points Cali cabs are not the way to go for everyday drinkers. Chile is where I head for low priced cabs.

As for Allagash, the Black is pretty great too and the FV 13 if you can find it and like sour beers. Not something id drink all the time but refreshingly different and very good.
More times than not, I've been disappointed with current vintages of sub $25 Napa cabs and now pretty much avoid that category. They do seem to improve a bit with age, but I don't have the extra cellar space to allocate to them. If you are looking for a Caymus substitute at the $25 price range you will probably be disappointed too. I second the votes for Chappellet Signature and Mondavi Oakville, but they probably won't be a pop-n-pour performers like Caymus. In a good year you could also add Round Pond Estate, but all these are around $40-$45 per bottle. Maybe try something from Washington (Novelty Hill and Seven Hills come to mind). Good luck.
quote:
Originally posted by heckofagator:
I just looked up the Beringer Knights and saw this at Total Wine.

"Wine Advocate - Knights Valley, CA- "Firm tannins support an expressive core of dark red fruit, grilled herbs, asphalt and savory herbs, all of which come to life in a vibrant Cabernet Sauvignon long on personality and character. This is a serious wine for the money."

ASPALT?!??!?!? Is that an acquired taste? Big Grin


Have you seen Somm?!

Common descriptors of taste & smell throughout the film include "inflatable pool toy, grandma's closet, and urine..."
+1 Shane Spit lest we forget the "freshly cut garden hose"

All in all my wife and I thoroughly enjoyed the film.

Gator. Do you have any "local" wine shops (not a bev mo for example) in your area? We have many and one of my favs offers weekly tastings of many different varietals. For a buck! Can't beat that kind of exposure. A simple and very effective way to broaden your palate, and meet fellow enthusiasts as

Maybe give Louis Martini a try, Hidden Ridge, Volker Eisele (a fav), Wm Harrison, and some of the Bordeaux style blends such as BV Tapestry. Currently 30 bucks @ Costco.

Most of all, keep trying new things. Cheers
quote:
Originally posted by nevada slim:
More times than not, I've been disappointed with current vintages of sub $25 Napa cabs and now pretty much avoid that category... If you are looking for a Caymus substitute at the $25 price range you will probably be disappointed too. I second the votes for Chappellet Signature and Mondavi Oakville, but they probably won't be a pop-n-pour performers like Caymus... but all these are around $40-$45 per bottle.

Good point about the Chappellet Signature I recommended not being pop-and-pour. Definitely requires decanting or else open it many many hours before drinking and just leave the bottle open. (The Lewelling I reccomended specifically for its lush, pop-and-pour characteristic.)
My go-to recommendations for Cabs in the $25 and under category are from Washington -- Columbia Crest, Chateau Ste. Michelle and Milbrandt. As mentioned, you're not going to get Caymus quality with these, but they are usually solid wines. A quick search of WS database shows the 2009 and 2010 Columbia Crest H3 Cabernets were rated 90 pts with a list price of $15, and 3 of their single vineyard reserve Cabernets have a list price of $30 and were rated either 91 or 92 pts. Chateau Ste. Michelle single vineyard Cabernets (as well as their Syrahs and Merlots) are usually solid and in the $15-$30 range. I don't recall if I've had a Milbrandt Cabernet (know I've had the Syrah, which was nice for the price), but their 2009 and 2010 Traditions bottlings both received 90 pts with a list price of $15. Their next step up is the Estates at about $25 I think

For California, I typically recommend Kendall Jackson (Grand Reserve or Grand Estates or something like that) as it is readily available. But, I believe that is Sonoma. For Napa, I've heard some good things about Buehler (though been pretty mixed) and Louis Martini. I've had some good luck with Charles Krug in the past. And recently, I opened up a 2007 Gallo Family Barelli Creek Vineyard (not Napa) that I purchased for $30 and I thought it was a great QPR. Side note on that wine -- WS rated it 83 pts, while I think WA rated it 92.
Gang, again, thanks for the continued comments and recommendations. I'm going to go thru this and make a list of all that you've mentioned. If anyone has any further Washington recommendations, please feel free to list your favorites. Again, I'm not stuck on the cabs at all, I had just mentioned that 'cause the Caymus was a cab.

We have a Total Wine around here and the std ABC Liquor. I'm sure there's other places I'm just not sure about, but I'm def interested in some tastings. I'll have to call around.
There have been quite a few good suggestions on this thread, one of the things I can recommend is do lots of wine tastings, In our area about once and month or so one of the local wine bars or liquor stores offer wine tastings with several distributor reps. It's a great way to try several different wines and see what you like.
quote:


When & if your wine hobby drifts to Spain, Italy, or the Southern Rhone, I find a ton of better QPR wines in the $20-30 range. In the mean time, get out to some local tastings if they're available.

Cheers, & welcome.


What he said directly above. I have found my daily reds primarily from Italy at a fraction of the cost of a decent Cab.
quote:
Originally posted by nevada slim:
Are there really any Italian wines that could be considered an alternative to Caymus CS, or has the thread just turned to daily drinkers?


Casanova di Neri Pietradonice?? Just a guess. Never had it unfortunately.
heck;
Lots of good choices in the previous posts. Nothing wrong with being budget-minded, and here's a few that I've had recently that should fit your bill for smooth, surprisingly complex wines:

    2010 Leese-Fitch Cabernet Sauvignon - $10-15 retail just about anywhere; drinks more like a $40+ cab.
    2010 Bridlewood Blend 175 - $14-17 retail, cab-based blend from the Santa Ynez/Central Coast region.
    2011 Orin Swift Abstract - $22-27 retail, a Cali take on GSM blends that is really very nice.


None of these should be too hard to find. Keep looking, there are a ton of bargain-priced wines out there that are real pleasers. Just takes patience - and a lot of empirical testing. Wink
Went to Total Wine today and picked up these:

Chappellet Signature Cab 2011
Avenel Cellars Napa Cab 2010
Dom des Versauds Morgon 2011

I basically wrote down some recommendations from here and showed it to the guy and asked for some help. He said the Chappellet was easily the best they had in the store under $60. I think I'm going to save that for Christmas.

I forget the story on the Avenel and the Dom was his recommendation when I said I'd like to try the Ste Michelle. Will try to still pick some of that up, but I'm curious about his recommendation, too.
One last question in this thread, if I may.

I picked up a Beringer Knights Valley cab 2010 today at ABC for $30. They had a bunch of 2011's on top and I was about to ask about the 2010 (because that year was mentioned her specifically) and found one underneath.

Is the 11 pretty close to the 10? In other words, should I hunt around for some more 10's or try the '11 next?
Chappellet also has a lower priced bottling under the label " http://www.chappellet.com/inde...86-82a9-36b3e7f316f3 Cervantes Mountain Cuvee." We served it at our wedding and it was a big hit with everyone and should be attainable around $30. The Signature is a better wine but the Mountain cuvee is a very good wine for the price point and more approachable as a pop & pour (definitely decant the Signature).

Another that I haven't seen mentioned that is pretty good at a $25 price point is the BV Rutherford Cabernet Sauvignon. Like Caymus, the winery is located in Rutherford which is an area known for "Rutherford Dust" which is a reference to an earthy, dusty flavor in the wine.

At closer to a $40 price point is Frog's Leap which should hit some of those notes too. It tends to be lush--though not as lush as Caymus--and you'll get a little more of the dust note. Different but delicious in its own right.
quote:
One last question in this thread, if I may.

I picked up a Beringer Knights Valley cab 2010 today at ABC for $30. They had a bunch of 2011's on top and I was about to ask about the 2010 (because that year was mentioned her specifically) and found one underneath.

Is the 11 pretty close to the 10? In other words, should I hunt around for some more 10's or try the '11 next?


I haven't had the 2011 for that specific wine but in general 2010 was a better vintage for Napa & Sonoma. Both are cool vintages but from the sounds of it, 2011 was generally cooler and more difficult. You were right to grab the 2010 but I'd try it and make sure I like it before seeking out more. If you do, I'd reach for the 2010 if they're both available but I wouldn't necessarily avoid the 2011 without trying one first.
quote:
Originally posted by Icewino:
Something like Concha Y Toro's Marques de Casa Concha (a favorite of mine for 18 or 20 dollars) and the Montes Alpha.



These are great options as they are readily available almost everywhere and are solid year in year out for the price. At least give them a try for the price.
Heckofagator,

Just a recommendation in your original price range from Spain.....Search wide and far for the Atalaya Almansa 2010 (NOT the Atalaya Laya).

It is a blend of Grenache and Monastrell.... but it certainly is lush, rich, very perfumed, full bodied and even moderately a bit complex for about $14.

I have been drinking Chile Cabs for years and years and I like them, but this Spanish bottle might fit the profile you describe a little better actually. Catena Malbec Mendoza is very consistent, as is Marques de Casa Concha Carmenere (can be easier to drink than the Cabs)

I do buy the Chappellet Signature, Mondavi Oakville cabs regularly and am looking @ Freemark Abbey right now. Honig too.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
If your wine budget is only $60 per month, I'd rather drink one bottle per month versus drinking a $15 bottle each week.

I do agree on attending tastings at local wine shops. It's a good way to find out what you may like or don't like.


This.

People will try to find a 'value' that tastest like Caymus but if there was a value alternative I'd drink it instead of Caymus. There isn't.
quote:
Originally posted by davec:
Hate to throw this cork into the mix, but is aroundany chance it was a Caymus Special Selection? While Caymus Cab is usually a good wine, CSS has been a wow wine for me several times, and would be much more difficult to match.


I think you can certainly match CSS at least at it's price point because there's a lot of good wine to be had for that kind of $$.
It's tougher to match if you're looking to spend less, maybe, but I would throw in Karl Lawrence here...for me, it's a similar fruit profile and oak treatment. Unfortunately, the 2010 cab is the last vintage for KL. Also at a lesser, but still premium price, I would maybe turn to Ladera Howell Mt or their Lone Canyon.
I would also throw in just the Napa Cab from Ladera as a good daily drinker for around $30 in reference to the earlier posts.
quote:
Originally posted by Bordeaux4Wino:
quote:
Originally posted by davec:
Hate to throw this cork into the mix, but is aroundany chance it was a Caymus Special Selection? While Caymus Cab is usually a good wine, CSS has been a wow wine for me several times, and would be much more difficult to match.


I think you can certainly match CSS at least at it's price point because there's a lot of good wine to be had for that kind of $$.
It's tougher to match if you're looking to spend less, maybe, but I would throw in Karl Lawrence here...for me, it's a similar fruit profile and oak treatment. Unfortunately, the 2010 cab is the last vintage for KL. Also at a lesser, but still premium price, I would maybe turn to Ladera Howell Mt or their Lone Canyon.
I would also throw in just the Napa Cab from Ladera as a good daily drinker for around $30 in reference to the earlier posts.

Honestly, I think CSS is not at all what heckofagator had, though I hope he comes back to report on progress.

Personally, I think CSS is a better $130 CA Cab than Caymus is an $80 CA Cab, though neither would be my choices at those price points.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by Bordeaux4Wino:
quote:
Originally posted by davec:
Hate to throw this cork into the mix, but is aroundany chance it was a Caymus Special Selection? While Caymus Cab is usually a good wine, CSS has been a wow wine for me several times, and would be much more difficult to match.


I think you can certainly match CSS at least at it's price point because there's a lot of good wine to be had for that kind of $$.
It's tougher to match if you're looking to spend less, maybe, but I would throw in Karl Lawrence here...for me, it's a similar fruit profile and oak treatment. Unfortunately, the 2010 cab is the last vintage for KL. Also at a lesser, but still premium price, I would maybe turn to Ladera Howell Mt or their Lone Canyon.
I would also throw in just the Napa Cab from Ladera as a good daily drinker for around $30 in reference to the earlier posts.

Honestly, I think CSS is not at all what heckofagator had, though I hope he comes back to report on progress.

Personally, I think CSS is a better $130 CA Cab than Caymus is an $80 CA Cab, though neither would be my choices at those price points.


Agreed!
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
quote:
Originally posted by eyesintime:
My go-to recommendations for Cabs in the $25 and under category are from Washington


Ding ding ding!


Ditto. Drop a few Washington Cabs into a blind tasting, next to the Caymus you love, and see what's what. You may end up saving yourself a ton of cash. For $20-$25, I'm drinking Washington cabs all day over cabs from anywhere else, with the occasional exception of Chile.
Hey everyone,

We just returned from a 10 day cruise and drank a bunch of wine. We carried on 15 bottles and other members of our group carried on a bunch, too.

Just a couple quick thoughts....

The Tikal Patriota Malbec I mentioned earlier was the hit of the trip - everyone agreed (6 of us) it was the best red we had. And at $22 a bottle, that's good to me. I opened the Chappellet Signature for Christmas - it was ok, but seemed real average. The Knights Valley was similar, although if I had to choose 1, it'd be the Chappellet over the Knights Valley. My uncle brought several bottles of Joel Gott cab from Costco that he got for $14. I think that was probably the price winner certainly. Was 99% of the others, but at that price point, I can drink it more often. Like I said, the Signature was probably a little better (I did uncork it 3 hours before dinner) but at $50, just not really an option for me going forward.

I'm going to take a look at some more of the Malbecs and the Washington cabs.

I will consider a blind taste test with the Caymus and some others, when I find some more that I like. I think that'd be very telling.

Thanks all, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
quote:
Originally posted by heckofagator:
Thanks for all of the thoughts and comments.

Good idea on the the local tastings. Like I said, I don't know alot of wine, and less about reds, so most of the time I'm at the mercy of whatever we end up ordering. I did come across a Tikal Malbec and I really enjoyed, so I've managed to pick that up once or twice and have enjoyed it. But it wasn't the Caymus.

I can't imagine it gets better, but yeah, I guess I'm curious to see what $100 gets you now.

At $75 a bottle, this isn't something I can purchase a whole lot. Mostly maybe for Christmas and other special occasions. And I don't think I'm to the point yet where I can feel 100% comfortable to go spend $75 and then turn around and drink it. But maybe that comes with time and experience.

So you got some good advice above.

What exactly was it about the Caymus that you liked? Maybe if you can articulate that, you'd be more able to find something similar.

For me, Caymus, especially a young one like a 2009, is a rather oaky and fruity wine. That is the description of a lot of California Cab, but it's not a criticism if it's a profile that you like.

As others have pointed out, you're unlikely to get that same quality for $25. For one thing, the barrels alone cost nearly $1000 each, so they have a lot of investment to recoup.

But if you want a fair CA Cab, I think many of the suggestions so far are right on. Napa wines will be more expensive than wines from elsewhere in CA, so if you look at things like Justin for example, it's going to be less just because of where it's from. Look for wines from Sonoma, Paso Robles, etc. If you can find the Ridge Santa Cruz Cab, that's about $35 and it may be something you'd like. It's really an excellent wine. I'm not talking about the Monte Bello, which is about 3 times as expensive.

In addition to those mentioned, from Napa you can try Monticello and Steltzner both of which put out Cabs in the $30 range, as well as BV Rutherford, which can be a good value. The Beringer Knights Valley is a good call, but try the Napa Cab too - it is sometimes as good. And the Chappellet is a really good wine, but try their Mountain Cuvee for about $25, which is always a good buy IMO. The Signature was most likely in need of a long decant and even after that, it's not quite the same as the Caymus. IMO, it's an under-appreciated wine though.

And don't forget Washington. The Chateau St. Michelle is a good suggestion, but try their Merlot. In WA, the Merlot can be outstanding.

Which brings up another point. If some of the wines mentioned are kind of expensive, that's because many Americans think that Cab somehow should be a higher-ranking grape than Merlot. But if someone puts out a really good Cab, see if they also do a Merlot. Right now I'm drinking a Newton 1997 Merlot which isn't necessarily going to set the world on fire but it's a really nice wine that's reasonably mature at this point and still with some tannins to finish it off. It cost me about $24. I don't know what it goes for today.

The Tikal is a pretty pedestrian Malbec, so I'd suggest that you go out and pick up some better ones - you seem to like those so get them before the prices go up. The government of Argentina is so corrupt and stupid that the producers are forced to raise their prices and those cheap Malbecs are going to be history at some point in the near future. Ironically, that may make them more desirable by some people - some folks think that price = quality.

Which brings up another point - you mention that you'd like to see what $100 buys you. Well, once you hit $50 or so, pricing starts losing its relationship with quality. CA producers can get more, so they charge more.

Finally, if you liked that Caymus, go out and get the El Nido Clio. It's big and thick and loaded with that buttery quality that the Caymus has but it's half the price. Don't worry about the grape varieties - the fact is, the variety is far less important than many people think. But my guess is that you'll love the wine. Everyone I know who likes Caymus does.

Cheers, and hang around a bit.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×