Does anybody have any recommendations for an Aglianico that is drinking well now? I’ve had the De Conciliis Donnaluna in the past and have liked it. I am looking for something in the same price range - $15 to $30. By the way, I did find this thread from 2004 and thought it could be updated. TIA
Original Post
Alovini's Aglianico del Vulture 'Al Volo', 'Armand' and 'Le Ralle' are all delicious and the Armand and Le Ralle fall well within your price range. However I don’t know whether Alovini’s wines are available in the USA.
I am currently drinking the 2001 Armand and the 2003 Le Ralle and holding the even bigger but more expensive [32$] Al Volo 2000 which is also drinking but will keep.
For $25-$30, the 2001 Tormaresca Bocca di Lupo (Aglianico with some Cabernet) I had at a restaurant a couple of weeks ago was really nice.

I am sitting on the '02 and '03 of these based on earlier tasting, but with air, I'm sure you'd enjoy them very much.

Very classy for the price.

In the $12 range, I have enjoyed several bottles of '01 Tenuta Le Querce Aglianico Il Viola. Also had an '04 Salvatore Molettieri Irpinia Aglianico Cinque Querce recently that I think was decent (in the same price range).
I was considering a bottle of 1999 Feudi di San Gregorio for the nest off-line I go to.

I saw one from Paso Robles the other night and I want to try it. I still think there are domestic producers doing it the right way. Only about $14.
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
I was considering a bottle of 1999 Feudi di San Gregorio for the nest off-line I go to.

I saw one from Paso Robles the other night and I want to try it. I still think there are domestic producers doing it the right way. Only about $14.


If I understand your tastes, you're going to hate Aglianico, Spo. Agianlico is full of that Italian bitterness that puts some people off.
quote:
Originally posted by Spenser:
quote:
Originally posted by spo:
I was considering a bottle of 1999 Feudi di San Gregorio for the nest off-line I go to.

I saw one from Paso Robles the other night and I want to try it. I still think there are domestic producers doing it the right way. Only about $14.


If I understand your tastes, you're going to hate Aglianico, Spo. Agianlico is full of that Italian bitterness that puts some people off.

I find the bitterness comment interesting since my [very limited, one producer, 3 wines] experience is very much the opposite.
Alovini's 3 Aglianicos are models of quite sweet smoothness. If I was to criticise the wines it would be that they are possibly a bit too 'easy' - particularly for an Italian wine - but still very enjoyable well-made wines.
quote:
Originally posted by Nigel Groundwater:

I find the bitterness comment interesting since my [very limited, one producer, 3 wines] experience is very much the opposite.
Alovini's 3 Aglianicos are models of quite sweet smoothness. If I was to criticise the wines it would be that they are possibly a bit too 'easy' - particularly for an Italian wine - but still very enjoyable well-made wines.


OK, that's interesting to know. I've had a few Aglianicos that have been bitter, or maybe bittersweet, which I like in a wine, but my experience with the varietal is nevertheless very limited. I'll look for more to broaden my horizons.
quote:
Originally posted by Nigel Groundwater:
I find the bitterness comment interesting since my [very limited, one producer, 3 wines] experience is very much the opposite.
Alovini's 3 Aglianicos are models of quite sweet smoothness. If I was to criticise the wines it would be that they are possibly a bit too 'easy' - particularly for an Italian wine - but still very enjoyable well-made wines.

Nigel,

I don't know where Alovini is located or which appellation they use, but I've been noticing a shift towards that juicier, sweeter, riper style particularly in the Sannio and Beneventano zones (e.g. wineries Vini Nobilis and Vesevo, respectively).

Conversely, more structured (and presumably "Italian bitter") wines are to be found in the Taurasi and Aglianico del Vulture appellations, it seems.

This is my gross observation, and there are certainly exceptions in each case.

Among my favorite producers are Paternoster, Cantine del Notaio, Molettieri, Vigne di Mezzo, Basilisco, Le Querce, and Caputo, and they vary widely in terms of style.

I drink a lot of aglianico, I guess!
quote:
Originally posted by chaad:
quote:
Originally posted by Nigel Groundwater:
I find the bitterness comment interesting since my [very limited, one producer, 3 wines] experience is very much the opposite.
Alovini's 3 Aglianicos are models of quite sweet smoothness. If I was to criticise the wines it would be that they are possibly a bit too 'easy' - particularly for an Italian wine - but still very enjoyable well-made wines.

Nigel,

I don't know where Alovini is located or which appellation they use, but I've been noticing a shift towards that juicier, sweeter, riper style particularly in the Sannio and Beneventano zones (e.g. wineries Vini Nobilis and Vesevo, respectively).

Conversely, more structured (and presumably "Italian bitter") wines are to be found in the Taurasi and Aglianico del Vulture appellations, it seems.

This is my gross observation, and there are certainly exceptions in each case.

Among my favorite producers are Paternoster, Cantine del Notaio, Molettieri, Vigne di Mezzo, Basilisco, Le Querce, and Caputo, and they vary widely in terms of style.

I drink a lot of aglianico, I guess!


I will certainly be drinking more. Thanks for the wide list of producers.

The 3 Alovini wines I have are Aglianico del Vulture.

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