Hello. I am a graduate student at a university in the United States, and I was tasked with finding articles that deal with wine quality for a literature review. I did not expect to find such substantial literature on the intrinsic/extrinsic quality determinants of wine. Indeed, most of what I have been able to find relates to the quality of wine as determined by the individual taster. So, I pose this question to a community more familiar with this topic that myself: are there any scholars, journals, or academic researchers who have published articles that address ratings of specific wines--rather than attempting to define characteristics of quality perception.

For instance, has anyone researched critic reviews about the quality of Rioja Tempranillo wines? Or maybe Bordeaux wines? Has anyone noted that wines from x region tend to receive x awards? Things of this nature.

I am grateful for any assistance in this!
Original Post
would it count if you found your favorite wine maker and read/compared their vintage notes year over year?

or are you stuck on rating?

it seems you're jumbling three topics.

one which is, how does a critic rate a wine.
read more of those tasting notes by the individual taster


how a critic is suppose to rate a wine
https://www.erobertparker.com/info/legend.asp
http://www.winespectator.com/d...how/id/scoring-scale

quality of a wine.
which can be had from reading chemical breakdowns of various wines. This like residual sugar, pH, volatile acidity levels so on.


If we go back your last statement that you're finding correlation between a particular critic to a particular style of wine, I find it a rather silly study to do something objective with someone's subjective tasting note.
Something in the lines of this (??): "Using a new database on Italian wines we show that a guide’s quality evaluations are
affected by two sources of personal bias, namely generosity and personal preferences
towards certain types of wine characteristics."

----> http://www.wine-economics.org/...papers/AAWE_WP98.pdf

More interesting stuff: http://www.wine-economics.org/...aawe-working-papers/
to quote

"We provide clear evidence that quality ratings are affected by two sources
of tasters’ bias, the first related to the systematic difference in generosity between the
two judges and the second to the personal preferences of each taster towards certain
types of wine. These results are even more interesting if we think that the two tasters
work for the same wine guide and share a set of agreed tasting and grading rules."


wow, mind shattering results

different tasters taste wine differently!!!

in other news, scoring 100 pts means the price will go up!!
quote:
For instance, has anyone researched critic reviews about the quality of Rioja Tempranillo wines? Or maybe Bordeaux wines? Has anyone noted that wines from x region tend to receive x awards? Things of this nature.

To add to what g-man said, you're jumbling up too many different things.

"Wine Quality" and "wine ratings" are completely different things and only marginally related. Don't use one when you mean the other. Ratings are what an individual likes. SOME individuals are able to say that a wine is off for some reason or another, and some of those people are critics, but generally when you're talking about ratings you're not talking about "quality".

As far as Rioja goes - over the years, I've had many hundreds of them. Tasting a wonderful wine that's over 50 years old tells you what about quality? That the particular producer was able to put out a fantastic product. The guy next door maybe not. So how do you assess an overall region?

If you want to learn about that particular region, Wine Spectator did a very good article recently.

Regarding whether wines from a particular region get high scores, absolutely. Mediocre Burgundy gets scored highly because it's "supposed" to be good and people who rate it make lots of excuses for bad showings, usually stating that it's too early or too late for the specific wine. What you learn from that is that Burgundy has a drinking window of about five minutes.

Bordeaux is absolutely huge and produces an ocean of mediocre wine, but many of the better-known chateaux get great ratings nonetheless because they're famous.

Many of them, and many producers elsewhere, can produce "quality" wine in that the wine is not bacteria-laden, not incompletely fermented, not unripe or bitter or oxidized, etc. So all those wines will be "quality" wines.

That has nothing to do with whether they taste good.

I think that if you're going to do any kind of scholarly study, you need to learn a lot more about wine. You wouldn't go out and do a report on the reticular activating system without having any idea where it was or what it did or having read a little of Morruzi and Magoun.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
Mediocre Burgundy gets scored highly because it's "supposed" to be good and people who rate it make lots of excuses for bad showings, usually stating that it's too early or too late for the specific wine. What you learn from that is that Burgundy has a drinking window of about five minutes.


Corollary to GregT's law of Burgundy.

"You'll never taste the wine during that five minutes".
Seems to me you're trying to use science to explain something that tends to be very unscientific. Tough job.

One could fairly easily (I would think) research the cost of raw material from Grand Cru-esque vineyards around the world and draw from that. Meaning, if grapes from DuBrul Vineyard in WA or Stagecoach Vineyard in CA cost $___ per ton, that could be tied to the demand for those grapes and, likely, the resulting qualify of the wines produced from them (and, to take it further, the likely higher scores from critics). Then, if you know what vineyards create the "best" wines around the world, you could then research the raw data that makes up that particular site: soil types, trellis systems, irrigation, weather, etc. etc. etc. It would be masses of data, but I imagined you'd be able to draw some interesting conclusions (or hypotheses at least) from it.

*Whoops, just re-read OP. You're seeking articles. Disregard my babble.*
A bit late to the thread, sorry.

You have to define "quality".

Suppose you were doing an article about carbonated sodas (Coke, Pepsi, 7-up, diet versions, ginger ales, root beers, etc.).
Some people prefer one to the other. But what do you mean by "quality"?

Wines have different "qualities". That is, some are higher in alcohol, some are more fruity, some are very tannic, others heavy on oak.

Why do some people like liver and onions and others can't stand it? Is it the difference in the taste buds of one person vs. the other?

Bottom line....drink what you like. Pay attention to what others say only to find out if you and that person have similar tastes. One of my local wine merchants recommends wines to me to try, and, over the years, I have learned that I rarely like what he likes.

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