I, personally, think the, 'walk the vermoth bottle by the martini glass, and that's about enough vermouth for me..." is silly. Doesn't the original martini call for a decent amount of vermouth? For you traditionalists, what is the proper (or your preferred) ratio of gin to vermouth?

Secondarily, best gin for martinis? I have a bottle of Bulldog and a bottle of Hendricks at home. Can you guess what I'm thinking for a Friday evening?
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
I, personally, think the, 'walk the vermoth bottle by the martini glass, and that's about enough vermouth for me..." is silly. Doesn't the original martini call for a decent amount of vermouth? For you traditionalists, what is the proper (or your preferred) ratio of gin to vermouth?

Secondarily, best gin for martinis? I have a bottle of Bulldog and a bottle of Hendricks at home. Can you guess what I'm thinking for a Friday evening?


It was originally a 2-1 ratio. an In-and-out (rinse the glass or ice with vermouth) is a 5 or 6-1. I think a 3 or 4-1 is perfect.

Plymouth gin is my go to.

Of course the vermouth is at least as important as the gin. What are you using? Noilly pratt goes best with olives, Dolin goes best with lemon twist and Martini extra dry or Blanco are your standards. They each taste different with different gins. Personally I like Dolin best.
I prefer my Martini this way:

3 parts Bombay Sapphire
1 part Dolin Dry vermouth
1 dash orange bitters

Vermouth is a necessary component in a martini. Please store your vermouth in the fridge.

Also a Martini is made with gin, a Kangaroo is made with vodka.
A long time ago a bigger ratio was standard like R_S said and changed over time. When I bartended in college it was rare to get a request for anything other than a tiny bit of vermouth, more often no vermouth. I like vodka martinis with a splash of gin, about 4:1 ratio
When I worked in a country club locker room during high school, my boss had a slightly different version of the "walk the vermouth bottle by the glass." We had a member who, to put it politely, liked martinis at any time of the day. He came in one morning and asked me to get him a martini. Of course the 19th hole wasn't open yet, so I tracked down my boss and told him that Mr. X wanted a martini. He told me to go make it for him. I was probably a junior in high school at the time. I told him I didn't know how to make one and he said it's just gin. I asked, isn't there vermouth in it. He then took me into the 19th hole and showed me the "proper" way of making a martini.

If they want a martini, you pour in the gin and then take the vermouth bottle out of the rack and put it back. If they want a dry martini, you just put your hand on the bottle. And if they want a very dry martini, you just look at the bottle
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
I like vodka martinis with a splash of gin

Now there's something I've not seen before.

Isn't there a commandment that says Thou shalt not mix hard liquors in thy martini? I think it's right after Thou shalt not blend any other grape with thy pinot noir. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
I like vodka martinis with a splash of gin

Now there's something I've not seen before.

Isn't there a commandment that says Thou shalt not mix hard liquors in thy martini? I think it's right after Thou shalt not blend any other grape with thy pinot noir. Big Grin


Gin by itself is too harsh for me. I got the idea from an old (beyond wealthy) bar customer that did 1/2 Kettle / 1/2 Sapphire martinis.
It seems like today, whenever I'm at a restaurant or bar (literally, nearly every time) and I order a martini (after they ask if gin or vodka!), they ask, "Up?" I assume that means straight, with no vermouth. Right? I bugs me. If I order a martini, by definition, it should have some vermouth. I usually reply, "No, not up. With a little bit of vermouth...the classic style." Does, "Up?" mean no vermouth, or am I missing something?
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by BRR: Does, "Up?" mean no vermouth, or am I missing something?

It means shaken, or stirred, with ice.


But without ice in the glass


The 2 of these together. No ice in glass
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
The true ratio is which ever one you like. I like about 5 to 1. Stefania likes me to keep the f'ing vermouth out of her martini.

As long as it's not vodka.

A Vesper is a blend of Gin and Vodka.

Btw if you like a Vesper, I recommend using Cocci Americano instead of Lillet, as it will taste more like the drink was originally intended. Today's Lillet does not taste like the original Kina Lillet - was reformulated in the mid 80s to remove the quinine.
quote:
Originally posted by PD2K:
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
The true ratio is which ever one you like. I like about 5 to 1. Stefania likes me to keep the f'ing vermouth out of her martini.

As long as it's not vodka.

A Vesper is a blend of Gin and Vodka.

Btw if you like a Vesper, I recommend using Cocci Americano instead of Lillet, as it will taste more like the drink was originally intended. Today's Lillet does not taste like the original Kina Lillet - was reformulated in the mid 80s to remove the quinine.


Cocchi Aperitivo Americano
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by BRR: Does, "Up?" mean no vermouth, or am I missing something?

It means shaken, or stirred, with ice.


But without ice in the glass


The 2 of these together. No ice in glass


Martini up, manhattan up, margarita up, cosmo up, etc, you'll get it chilled one way or another in a martini glass with no ice. If they've got a bottle of gin in the freezer and pour it in a martini glass then serve it to you, that's also a martini "up".
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
Got it. So, I can assume that they're adding a bit of vermouth to my martini when I order one? I mean, I've never seen a martini served any way other than, "up."

You are correct. Unless specified, you will always get vermouth when ordering a gin martini. Also gin martinis are always served "up."

But I noticed bartenders ask if you want it "up" if ordering a "vodka martini," as some people simply want straight vodka on the rocks with a twist.
This thread reminds me of the time I was with my then father-in-law at a noisy bar in Calgary many years ago. When the waitress asked what he wanted, he raised his voice over the noise and said "A DRY MARTINI". She screwed up her face a little and said "What??" so he repeated his order. She looked puzzled but said "Okay...I'll ask the bartender". She brought our drinks and one sip was all it took for my father in law to know something wasn't right. The drink was awful. He asked her again for a DRY MARTINI over the noise of the bar, and she brought another drink. Same problem - it was disgusting. After some of that direct mouth to ear shouting one does in loud spaces to be heard, we all dissolved into gales of laughter when we discovered what the waitress had been hearing, and asking a confused bartender for, was a rye martini.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
This thread reminds me of the time I was with my then father-in-law at a noisy bar in Calgary many years ago. When the waitress asked what he wanted, he raised his voice over the noise and said "A DRY MARTINI". She screwed up her face a little and said "What??" so he repeated his order. She looked puzzled but said "Okay...I'll ask the bartender". She brought our drinks and one sip was all it took for my father in law to know something wasn't right. The drink was awful. He asked her again for a DRY MARTINI over the noise of the bar, and she brought another drink. Same problem - it was disgusting. After some of that direct mouth to ear shouting one does in loud spaces to be heard, we all dissolved into gales of laughter when we discovered what the waitress had been hearing, and asking a confused bartender for, was a rye martini.

That's awesome. Great story. But moreover: "...my then father-in-law"?? We need to talk.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
This thread reminds me of the time I was with my then father-in-law at a noisy bar in Calgary many years ago. When the waitress asked what he wanted, he raised his voice over the noise and said "A DRY MARTINI". She screwed up her face a little and said "What??" so he repeated his order. She looked puzzled but said "Okay...I'll ask the bartender". She brought our drinks and one sip was all it took for my father in law to know something wasn't right. The drink was awful. He asked her again for a DRY MARTINI over the noise of the bar, and she brought another drink. Same problem - it was disgusting. After some of that direct mouth to ear shouting one does in loud spaces to be heard, we all dissolved into gales of laughter when we discovered what the waitress had been hearing, and asking a confused bartender for, was a rye martini.


Sounds like a Manhattan with the right vermouth

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