Title from another thread. I have no idea if this is a real statistic or not. If you're going down to Walmart to buy a jug of Gallo, maybe. I don't think there are many on this forum who purchase wines to consume immediately. More likely the average grocery store wine buyer. But that got me to thinking...

What is the average length of time you store your purchases?

Obviously for some Bordeaux, Italian, dessert & other trophy wines,  it is going to be longer. But I think I tend to store even my mid-level wines at least 5-7 years before opening. I still have a few quality WA wines from '02 & '05, that I've been saving, along with a lot of German Rieslings from around the 90's & turn of this century. And I don't even buy many cellar defenders anymore.

My close friends aren't as patient as I. For instance, I recently shared a 2000 Barolo that was given to me as a gift. The friend who gave it to me had long ago finished off the case, (probably by 2005), and we were all stunned how beautifully it had aged. One of the best wines I have had in a long time.

Original Post

Probably a higher percentage for beer than wine.  That sounds really high for wine.  I suppose this must mean that many people buy 1 bottle for immediate consumption.  That is, you don't buy a case of wine and drink it all in 48 hrs, unless you've bought a case for a wedding or something.

Many of us who post here are not representative of the average wine buyer.  I have a friend who drinks inexpensive wine as her "go-to" after work beverage.  She buys wine when she runs out.  I think if you asked the "average" wine drinker in the US about their consumption, they would mirror this pattern.

When I was seriously bitten by the bug, most of the wine I purchased was acquired with the intention of long term storage.  I may have sampled a bottle out of a 6-pack, and then made a note as to when I wanted to revisit the bottling.  The average age of wines in my cellar are +10 years.  Likely close to 15.  I prefer European reds that benefit from age.

These days, I only buy Champagne and aged wines when needed.  I'll try to age the Champagne appropriately, but I have a problem in that I like Champagne on the younger side.  I currently have less than a case of bubbly in the cellar.  The aged wines I purchase, are usually for a specific purpose.  They are consumed shortly after receipt.

PH

 

futronic posted:

I generally have a corkscrew in my hand at checkout, so on average, I'd say that I wait about 6.75 seconds before opening a bottle I purchase.

Great approach! What glasses do you use or do you use an eco-friendly straw? (Not plastic of course, because those kill turtles.)

I was at a store the other day and the owner, who doesn't drink wine because she's Moslem, said that she's seen people buy a bottle, go into the parking lot, open them, and if they like the wine, they come back in and buy a case. Maybe she saw you!

gregt posted:
futronic posted:

I generally have a corkscrew in my hand at checkout, so on average, I'd say that I wait about 6.75 seconds before opening a bottle I purchase.

Great approach! What glasses do you use or do you use an eco-friendly straw? (Not plastic of course, because those kill turtles.)

I was at a store the other day and the owner, who doesn't drink wine because she's Moslem, said that she's seen people buy a bottle, go into the parking lot, open them, and if they like the wine, they come back in and buy a case. Maybe she saw you!

Oh, I just drink straight out of the bottle. Much less washing up. Plus, it doesn't kill turtles.

purplehaze posted:

Many of us who post here are not representative of the average wine buyer.  I have a friend who drinks inexpensive wine as her "go-to" after work beverage.  She buys wine when she runs out.  I think if you asked the "average" wine drinker in the US about their consumption, they would mirror this pattern.

When I was seriously bitten by the bug, most of the wine I purchased was acquired with the intention of long term storage.  I may have sampled a bottle out of a 6-pack, and then made a note as to when I wanted to revisit the bottling.  The average age of wines in my cellar are +10 years.  Likely close to 15.  I prefer European reds that benefit from age.

These days, I only buy Champagne and aged wines when needed.  I'll try to age the Champagne appropriately, but I have a problem in that I like Champagne on the younger side.  I currently have less than a case of bubbly in the cellar.  The aged wines I purchase, are usually for a specific purpose.  They are consumed shortly after receipt.

PH

 

You have under a case of bubbly in the cellar? You are slipping! What are you going to do if the Nats sweep?

It's probably worse than you all fear.  That 80% is oft quoted in the industry and regularly verified.  It's been consistent for years in that range.  Of the remaining 20% the vast majority is 'between visits'.  So 4 bottles are purchased to last the week until the next trip to the grocery store.  That brings the total up to something between 98% and 99.5% depending on the survey.

In the tasting room we consistently sell 'between visit' amounts to people.  They buy just enough until they come visit again and since most visitors live with 20 miles that's 2-3 bottles.  We actually have some people who stop by every week or two.

I always put an older vintage wine on the menu (2009 Cab right now) to inspire conversation about saving wine, so we as a tasting room probably have much more data than other tasting rooms.  I say that because of that small group who collects past 'between visits', the average collection is under 50 bottles.  That's probably 85% of the 1%.  I probably talk with someone local (California) who has more than 200 bottles about once every three months.  I do see more out of state people with larger cellars.  It's hard to say tough what's behind that stat.  I suspect it is skewed somewhat by lesser availability, you can't pop over to a good tasting room for a bottle on the way home, and somewhat skewed by the fact if I'm seeing you in my room from out of state, you're pretty serious about wine.

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