well, Kim Crawford has done it yet again! Quite possibly the most consistent producer of Sauv. Blanc in the world.

1/23/2009
-- cracked and poured --
-- tasted non-blind --

NOSE: acidic; grapefruit and minerals with a slight green element to it ... very nice-smelling Sauv. Blanc

BODY: nearly clear-colored; medium bodied

TASTE: lush mouthfeel for a Sauv. Blanc: nice citrus and pear notes; medium-long finish. Solid bottling year-in, year-out ... this is no exception.

B: 50, 5, 12, 16, 7 = 90
Original Post
Have to disagree on the most consistant sav producer in the world- that would have to go to Cloudy Bay whom have been doing it since the 70's. And Kim Crawford has had his troubles with wine audits in the past.

(Ie whats in the bottle isn't always whats on the label - a big incident that was never prosecuted with Coopers Creek back in the early 90's.)

However to be fair since the late 90's he certainly has lifted his game and left the controversy's behind him.
90 points if a fair score if you like cat's pee on a gooseberry bush. I can't drink his Sauv Blancs any more, though. Just too verdant for me.

It's odd that Crawford is so consistent with the Sauv, but still struggles with every other wine in the portfolio - red or white. Tasting them blind, I peg them all for $8 plonk.
I'm also a big fan of KC Sauv Blanc. They used to represent an extremely good value at $10-$12 per bottle, but I've seen them creeping up a bit to more near $15-$17 in some cases. That's outside what I'm really willing to pay for a SB. There are a few others that are almost as good for $5 less. When it's on special, though, I buy.
quote:
Originally posted by vinole:
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:

The 07 sounds better anyway!


I was not a fan of the 07 vintage for NZ SB, and IMO the 08 KC was slightly better than the 07 as it had more acidity. The 06 blew both years away.


Definitely agree the 08 KC is better than the 07, which was his weakest SB in the past 5 years imo.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Brashley:


Quite possibly the most consistent producer of Sauv. Blanc in the world.



My vote goes to the late Didier Dagueneau.


Not exactly a fair comparison at the two price points. I cook with KC and it has the added bonus of being very drinkable while I'm doing the cooking. I'm certainly not going to throw a cup of Pur Sang into the pan to deglaze. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Brashley:


Quite possibly the most consistent producer of Sauv. Blanc in the world.



My vote goes to the late Didier Dagueneau.


Not exactly a fair comparison at the two price points. I cook with KC and it has the added bonus of being very drinkable while I'm doing the cooking. I'm certainly not going to throw a cup of Pur Sang into the pan to deglaze. Big Grin


The question was... Most Consistent, and I repeat, Dagueneau! Razz
quote:
Originally posted by escape:
wine + art

Clearly Dags was a genius.....and clearly these two makers are in very different classes.


I don't know if I would say that. KC's sav blanc is marketed at the cheaper end of the market. He has also been involved in some of the top wines produced in NZ since the 80's. He also produces single vineyard wines that are very very good.

I doubt Didier Daganau could produce chardonnay, pinot noir, bubbles, syrah, merlot, cabernet, gewurztraminer, riesling, sav blanc and pinot gris across tiers of wine prices with consistant quality from average (Kim crawford label) to very very good (His Small Parcel wines and numerous other wineries he has worked at.).
quote:
Originally posted by WISAD:
quote:
Originally posted by escape:
wine + art

Clearly Dags was a genius.....and clearly these two makers are in very different classes.


I don't know if I would say that. KC's sav blanc is marketed at the cheaper end of the market. He has also been involved in some of the top wines produced in NZ since the 80's. He also produces single vineyard wines that are very very good.

I doubt Didier Daganau could produce chardonnay, pinot noir, bubbles, syrah, merlot, cabernet, gewurztraminer, riesling, sav blanc and pinot gris across tiers of wine prices with consistant quality from average (Kim crawford label) to very very good (His Small Parcel wines and numerous other wineries he has worked at.).


Well Didier Daganau certainly not.. Razz but Didier Dagueneau could have done anything with any grapes and it would have been spectacular.
It is easy to do a thousand varietals and make below average wines (I'm sorry but KC SB is a bad caricature a NZ Sb).
Now try to transcend the grape like Dagueneau did and that's another story.
That's why he was the best winemaker for SB bar none. To bring KC up to his level is quite funny...
quote:
Originally posted by WISAD:


I doubt Didier Daganau could produce chardonnay, pinot noir, bubbles, syrah, merlot, cabernet, gewurztraminer, riesling, sav blanc and pinot gris across tiers of wine prices with consistant quality from average (Kim crawford label) to very very good (His Small Parcel wines and numerous other wineries he has worked at.).



Now that is funny as hell!

Thanks for the laugh out loud. Big Grin
Well WISAD,

I think I understand where you are going with this.....I think and clearly recognize that there is a price difference that might require the use of "most consistent QPR" rather than such a broad statement. However, asking Dag to played in that field is like limiting Babe Ruth to singles, or an artist to finger painting.....Curious, but have to ask the question, have you ever tasted one of his wines?.....Purely transcendant in my opinion, certainly enough to pay upwards of $80 to $100 for a SB, and I would be happy to share a bottle with anyone who has not had the priveledge.
When I want something done right, I prefer to go to a specialist, not a general contractor. That comes off as extremely snobbish, I am aware, especially when my personal budget does not allow frequent purchase of $100 SB. But to remain true to the thread of "most consistent SB producer in the world", I would be willing to pay the $100, knowing that I would never EVER be disappointed. Having had each Kim Crawford vintage offered over the last 10 years, I cannot say the same.
RIP Dags and I hope your children will carry this tradition forward.
Escape,

Yes in fact a friend of mine was the first person to point out Didier Daganau here on the forums back in 2001 ( we drank three different bottlings of his and Pascal Jolivet together in a tasting organised by Peter Maude.)- Jeremy is his name. I have drank Didier Daganau, Pascal Jolivet, and numerous other Pouilly Fume and Sancere. Yes they are very very good.

BUT as only 15 of Kim Crawfords wines are even exported to the US I would not be willing to comment on them unless I had tried them. As I stated earlier I am by no means a fan of his wines- there is alot of controversy surrounding them. His Small Parcel wines are very very good, if somewhat different (ie one of the savs is given oak and lees stirring and bottled after a year.). And to mention some of the top NZ sav's on these forums alot of them have had his influence, or winemaking in the background.

Keep in mind that all NZ producers are tiny- Kim Crawfords commercial release (and he is a big label in terms of production in NZ) is about 800,000 bottles (less than 90,000 cases.).

edit- Please understand I am not saying KC is better than Daganau nor Daganau is better than KC. I am simply stating the wine you are talking about is the lowest tier on Kim Crawfords wine range. I am also stating that I doubt Daganau would be brilliant at all grape varieties as the process of learning to make great wine doesn't start at being a good winemaker in one. Example Michael Brajkovich is brilliant at Chardonnay, but I am yet to be convinced by his Pinot Noir. Something he admits he is still learning about.
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
Definitely agree the 08 KC is better than the 07, which was his weakest SB in the past 5 years imo.
I'm glad I'm not the only one who perceived a drop in quality in the '07s, I tried 2 bottles and they really didn't do much for me so I didn't purchase any more. I will give the '08 a go.
quote:
Originally posted by vinole:
I was not a fan of the 07 vintage for NZ SB, and IMO the 08 KC was slightly better than the 07 as it had more acidity. The 06 blew both years away.
After trying the 08 this evening I would have to agree with you, the 06 was a steal (I probably went through a case of these during the summer), the 07 tasted as if it was watered down and almost put me completely off the label, and the 08 is certainly a huge improvement from the 07 but not quite as good as the 06. For $22 locally this will probably return to being my stock "party wine" as well as a frequent summer sipper.
Had this tonight with dinner and continued drinking afterwards. It shows as a light, clear gold with a subtle greenness to it. The nose was heavy on the grapefruit, as well as pine and lemon. The taste continued with the grapefruit, plus kiwi, lemon and acidity. The finish was tart and tangy, as well as dry.

Overall, it had a somewhat interesting sweetness and almost spiciness in the midst of all the tart flavor. My score was 88 and the wife was 86. This is definitely a good value wine, but it didn't grab me like some SB's have in the past...either that, or I am just not feeling the SB flavors this year.
I tried the 08 right out of the wine fridge at 56 degrees and was totally overpowered by acidity and was not a fan. I had another bottle chilled in the fridge before opening (low 40's if I had to guess), and liked it significantly better. Was really surprised by the variation in flavor profile in this wine based on temp. the few degrees seemed to mute a lot of the sourness of the fruit without taking away the crispness.
I became disenchanted with many of the wines from NZ and Australia quite a while ago. The NZ SBs are OK, but you could almost add alcohol to grapefruit juice and get something not overly dissimilar. For me now, I may occasionally buy a few to put out at a barbecue, but that's it.
quote:
Originally posted by Pippin:
Just had two bottles of this wine over the past week. OK drink, nothing special, just very average. Is this wine too old now? At best 85 points


Good summer drinker without great merit or standings. A bit too loaded with acid fruit.

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