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Reply to "1730 PX Sherry"

Stevie,
If "almost" means you didn't buy it then my purpose has backfired. Of course I ignore what you're being asked for, but that winery has disappeared completely (the solera ran dry) and there's no human way of getting any more of that wine, which incidentally ought to be excellent, and doubly expensive as an extinct rarity.

Now in general:

I've always been rather suspicious of Sherry bodegas saying things like "the only reason why we don't get higher ratings in the US is that Americans are so obsessed with vintage dates that they simply won't recommend a wine when they believe there's no way of guaranteeing the consistency of the product (whereas in fact the solera system of course guarantees the homogeneity of the product like no other)" but now I'm getting to verify this in person: Why all this fuss with mediaeval dates on bottles? If you like the contents why do you feel disappointed with the non-vintageness of it?
Do you ever drink Aussie stickies? Why do such terms as "Museum Release" or "Rare Special" sound less tricky than "Solera 1910"? If you enjoy Chambers muscats enough to pay what they fetch and you travel to Rutherglen, ask the guy the real average age of the product and get something like "this is a solera from ---- but no vintage stuff," will you stop enjoying the wine?

Sorry, I re-read and see I may be sounding overexcited, but it seems to me that you're questioning a system that's older than our greatgrandparents on the basis that it simply isn't "chic." All I can say is there is no vintage Sherry/Montilla for sale in the regular trade any older than the first decades of this century, and when it comes to dry vintage sherry I think one of the very few houses doing it is González-Byass, where the current releases are around the late 60s-early 70s. If that doesn't blow your nose away the vintage date on the label won't either.
For 19C vintage stuff decidedly try Madeira.
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