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Anyone going tomorrow? Gotham Hall 12:30-5:30.
 
Posts: 2226 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: Aug 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah well, too late for me but was this a Trade event only? How would a commoner like myself obtain an invite/ticket in the future? I can find nothing on the internet directly related to this event. I have been to Suckling's last 2 Bellissimo Brunello tastings and grown quite fond of the wines and have been stocking-up on '04,'06'&'07. Are they featuring a particular vintage (2008)? I hope you post notes for us all.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Primordialsoup,


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1934 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I received an invitation from some of my producer friends from Montalcino. The "tickets" could be found on EventBrite. Overall, a very nice event and Gotham Hall is an excellent venue for such an event.

Forty producers were present and all 40 showed their 2008 Brunelli. Many also presented the '07 Riservas and still others 2006 Riservas.

General impressions.

2010 Rossi are excellent wines with the following showing very well:

Pinino - Best of the event
Querce Bettina - Very good
Col d'Orcia - Very good
Col d'Orcia Banditella - Very good
Le Ragnaie - Good
Capanna - Good
Canalicchio di Sopra - Good
Gianni Brunelli - Good
Il Poggione - Good

The 2011 Rossi were disappointing and some were actually undrinkable IMO. Pietroso was one of the worst RdM I have ever tasted.

Best Brunelli:

2004 Poggio al Vento - Truly a classic BdM and one of the best young BdMs I have ever tasted. From Magnum.
1999 Il Poggione Riserva - WOW! This is what BdM should be.
2006 Querce Bettina Riserva - As good as I remember when I was in Montalcino in November. Somebody needs to pick up the distribution of this estate in the US.

Best 2008's:

Uccelliera
Donatella Cinelli Colombini
Le Chiuse
Pinino
Il Poggione
Col d'Orcia
Poggio Salvi

This will be an early drinking vintage and I would not age these wines more than 10 years. They are very approachable right now with about an hour of air in the bottle.

Best 2007 Riservas:

Livio Sasseti Pertimali
Podere Brizio (Roberto Bellini)
La Magia
Il Poggione Vigna Paganelli
Gianni Brunelli

Several producers brought other wines as well. The best of those included:

Col d'Orcia 1998 Poggio al Vento
Le Chiuse 2001 Riserva
Capanna 2010 Moscadello di Montalcino
Col d'Orcia 2008 Pascena Moscadello di Montalcino

This was an enjoyable event and best of all it was free.
 
Posts: 2226 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: Aug 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Longboarder:
2006 Querce Bettina Riserva - As good as I remember when I was in Montalcino in November. Somebody needs to pick up the distribution of this estate in the US.

g-man, you reading this?
 
Posts: 5216 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: Aug 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by Longboarder:
2006 Querce Bettina Riserva - As good as I remember when I was in Montalcino in November. Somebody needs to pick up the distribution of this estate in the US.

g-man, you reading this?


someone needs to pick up importing it.

but i personally don't like italina =)


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Posts: 12515 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the notes Longboarder.
 
Posts: 1746 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 21, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Far smaller than in previous years. I think the Italian economic problems were quite evident based on the low turnout.

Nonetheless, some of the wines were pretty good. Unfortunately, in some cases wood and oak and the consequent destruction of some otherwise fine wines was disappointing.

And as always I thought the rossos showed the caliber of the wineries. Some were delicious. Seems like some of the 2011s are going to be nice. Nothing like the 2006s when the rossos just had you waiting for the bigger wines to arrive, but nice nonetheless.

The people making the Bettina were nice. The wine however, was an easy pass. Lots of oak, lots of acetone, and high-priced for something I didn't really care for. No idea who the market would be, since I could barely drink it.

I'm not going to post a list of scores and tasting notes on over a hundred wines, especially since I went to a different tasting right afterwards and I'm just now recovering with a nice Syrah and perhaps some Maderia later.

I don't have the depth of experience, the palate to confidently state that such and such was 92 vs 93, or the need to post a zillion notes on CT, but given that my favorite wines weren't there, I think the wines form Camigliano, the Col d'Orcia, the Collosorbo, and the 08 Marroneto were nice. Sometimes the rossos, sometimes the Brunello 07 and sometimes the 08, but in general they were satisfying.

The Argiano was barely palatable, Poggione was overloaded with sulfur and was vegetal and tannic and that was true of all vintages and every wine they showed, Podere Brizio was vegetal and acetone-flavored, and poor Bettina was over sulfured and smelled of rotten fruit.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2678 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the feedback guys.

LB, would you say the 2008's were similar to the hot 2003 vintage or like the 2005's? I wonder what happened to the Rossi in 2011? There had been such a good run.


"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return."
 
Posts: 1934 | Registered: Feb 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by GregT:
Far smaller than in previous years. I think the Italian economic problems were quite evident based on the low turnout.

Nonetheless, some of the wines were pretty good. Unfortunately, in some cases wood and oak and the consequent destruction of some otherwise fine wines was disappointing.

And as always I thought the rossos showed the caliber of the wineries. Some were delicious. Seems like some of the 2011s are going to be nice. Nothing like the 2006s when the rossos just had you waiting for the bigger wines to arrive, but nice nonetheless.

The people making the Bettina were nice. The wine however, was an easy pass. Lots of oak, lots of acetone, and high-priced for something I didn't really care for. No idea who the market would be, since I could barely drink it.

I'm not going to post a list of scores and tasting notes on over a hundred wines, especially since I went to a different tasting right afterwards and I'm just now recovering with a nice Syrah and perhaps some Maderia later.

I don't have the depth of experience, the palate to confidently state that such and such was 92 vs 93, or the need to post a zillion notes on CT, but given that my favorite wines weren't there, I think the wines form Camigliano, the Col d'Orcia, the Collosorbo, and the 08 Marroneto were nice. Sometimes the rossos, sometimes the Brunello 07 and sometimes the 08, but in general they were satisfying.

The Argiano was barely palatable, Poggione was overloaded with sulfur and was vegetal and tannic and that was true of all vintages and every wine they showed, Podere Brizio was vegetal and acetone-flavored, and poor Bettina was over sulfured and smelled of rotten fruit.

I appreciate your impressions but have to say I differ with you in the assessment of some of the wines.

It's like we tasted two different wines with respect to Querce Bettina ("over-oaked and smelled of rotten fruit"). I know their BdM only sees Slovenian Oak in 35Hl botti since I have been in the cellar on three different occasions. The RdM is aged in 350-500 L tonneaux so if that is what you were referring to as over-oaked I could understand that. I will also say that I am not a fan of over-oaked wines and consider myself to be sensitive to the use of oak in a heavy handed way.

I agree with you on the Argiano. Disagree with Il Poggione. The '08 was very tannic and a little green but not as unpleasant as Pietroso. I did not like the Marroneto but it is more of a stylistic thing than a poorly made wine. Some of the wines were poorly made IMO.

This just goes to show that everyone's palate is different and bottle variation is real.
 
Posts: 2226 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: Aug 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The owners of Bettina were as charming as their wines were not. It's too bad because I really wanted to like their wines. They were quite eager to talk about them and to talk about the region and they seemed like very nice folks to pass some time with. They did in fact talk to us about their oak, etc., because I specifically asked them. So he pulled out pictures and text and I got a whole lesson in how they make their wine, appreciating him far more than his wine.

A good portion of the wines I drink are Spanish, so I don't have a problem with wood, but there's good wood and bad wood and the problem I had with many of the Brunellos was that the wood wasn't really doing much to help the wines.

Re: Bettina, here are my notes.

2010 Rosso di Montalcino - nice red cherries on the nose and on the palate but comes with an extremely unpleasant aroma of rotting fruit. Seems to have a VA issue or some flaw, because the fruit seems like it should be much better and not so rustic. Unfortunate. Easy pass.

2008 Brunello - sour, tart, woody and not good wood either, but rough tough wood. WTF?

2007 Brunello Riserva - sulfury as hell. Swirling super hard for a minute doesn't seem to help either. Not even drinkable at this stage, if ever. The winemaker needs to be fired before he blows the place up.

For whatever it's worth, I tried these wines with two other people, one a sommelier and one a wine writer who's actually written a few articles for WS here. We all felt pretty much the same. I don't know exactly what the problem was, maybe VA, because what I refer to as predominantly rotten fruit, some other people referred to as acetone or nail polish remover, which I can understand. Not good in either case though. Since VA doesn't necessarily produce notes of acetic acid but can produce other acetate compounds, that makes sense but honestly, I have no idea.

Don't want to aggressively slam their wines however, there's no reason to do that and as I said, they were very nice people.

Completely agree that some wines were just poorly made. And maybe the Bettina is all about bottle variation - I hope so.

Cheers.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2678 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Interesting exchange about the QB wines since we're having dinner with Roberto and his wife up here tonight. I believe we will be drinking the 2007 and 2008 rossos, 2005 and 2007 normale Brunello and the 06 Riserva Brunello.

I've only ever tried the 05 and 06 normale before and was impressed with both, especially the latter. Didn't find either to be over-oaked.
 
Posts: 10289 | Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Dec 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Steve - please post your impressions of the wines. With all the love, I'd be interested in trying them again some time.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2678 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There was some slight VA on the 2007 Rosso, but that's the only one from the wines we drank last night. Despite that, I still enjoyed it the two rossos we had. They're a bigger style than many rossos.

As for the Brunellos, the 06 Riserva is definitely excellent and I will be picking some up when it hits our shelves at the end of March. The 2007 is young, but delicious and the 2005 was drinking well, much like the bottle I opened about 6 months ago.

Oak? I didn't get anything off-putting and I'm not a fan of over-oaked wines. And as LB stated above, it's hard to imagine his BdM's being oaky because he ages in large botti.
 
Posts: 10289 | Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Dec 25, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My take on the wines tasted were spot on to yours, steve8. A touch of VA on the '07 Rosso. Also agree that Q-B's Rosso are fuller bodied than most. I enjoyed the style.

I nursed the '06 Riserva in glass all evening and it continuously transformed itself into something yet better. A definite BUY on the Riserva. I look forward to the release as well. A beautifully made wine.

side note:This being the first opportunity to meet Roberto and Sandra, it was indeed a real pleasure to chat over a meal. A charming couple. I wish them well.
 
Posts: 15740 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by GregT:
The owners of Bettina were as charming as their wines were not. It's too bad because I really wanted to like their wines. They were quite eager to talk about them and to talk about the region and they seemed like very nice folks to pass some time with. They did in fact talk to us about their oak, etc., because I specifically asked them. So he pulled out pictures and text and I got a whole lesson in how they make their wine, appreciating him far more than his wine.

A good portion of the wines I drink are Spanish, so I don't have a problem with wood, but there's good wood and bad wood and the problem I had with many of the Brunellos was that the wood wasn't really doing much to help the wines.

Re: Bettina, here are my notes.

2010 Rosso di Montalcino - nice red cherries on the nose and on the palate but comes with an extremely unpleasant aroma of rotting fruit. Seems to have a VA issue or some flaw, because the fruit seems like it should be much better and not so rustic. Unfortunate. Easy pass.

2008 Brunello - sour, tart, woody and not good wood either, but rough tough wood. WTF?

2007 Brunello Riserva - sulfury as hell. Swirling super hard for a minute doesn't seem to help either. Not even drinkable at this stage, if ever. The winemaker needs to be fired before he blows the place up.

For whatever it's worth, I tried these wines with two other people, one a sommelier and one a wine writer who's actually written a few articles for WS here. We all felt pretty much the same. I don't know exactly what the problem was, maybe VA, because what I refer to as predominantly rotten fruit, some other people referred to as acetone or nail polish remover, which I can understand. Not good in either case though. Since VA doesn't necessarily produce notes of acetic acid but can produce other acetate compounds, that makes sense but honestly, I have no idea.

Don't want to aggressively slam their wines however, there's no reason to do that and as I said, they were very nice people.

Completely agree that some wines were just poorly made. And maybe the Bettina is all about bottle variation - I hope so.

Cheers.


Greg T-I just read through your notes and it looks like we indeed did taste different wines. I went back through my notes and I tasted the 2010 Rosso and the '06 Riserva. They poured 2 bottles of the '06 and the rest was the '07 Riserva and the '08 normale. I did not have any notes on the '07 or '08. It appears the only wine we both tasted was the '10 Rosso. I did not pick up VA in the wine and I tasted with a wine bar owner and a chef friend of mine. Neither picked up VA either. I don't know enough about the process to k ow if VA can be variable in different bottles. I do know that the acetone smells are very distinguishable and don't normally blow off.

I always enjoy your posts and find them very detailed and educational. Would love to share a glass sometime.
 
Posts: 2226 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: Aug 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the kind words! And ditto.

I will definitely re-taste the Bettina wines. Talked to my buddy yesterday and he checked his notes and confirmed that there was something off. No idea what happened when we were tasting but I'm glad that's not characteristic of their wines in general. They seem like really nice folks and I wish them well.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2678 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had I known a complement would relax your discursiveness; I would have done so years ago. Wink
 
Posts: 167 | Location: St. Louis | Registered: Jan 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Jay Miller:
Had I known a complement would relax your discursiveness; I would have done so years ago. Wink

Woot

These guys are online pals. In your case, a bottle speaks louder than words.

But I have to say, the Gonzalo Byass tonight did it! Awesome wine and thanks for bringing it!


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2678 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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