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2010 Oregon Pinot Noir Vintage
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quote:
Originally posted by Sharkey:
quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
As I mentioned earlier I plan to pop some corks and decide for myself (critics be damned).


That sounds like a most excellent plan. Based on what I have tasted thus far, I would suggest . . .

Wineries:
Arterberry-Maresh
Brick House
Lemelson
Scott Paul
Sineann
Westrey
Witness Tree

I'm also buying Cameron, Cristom, Le Cadeau and Thomas -- without tasting -- but that is a no-brainer.

On the individual wine front, my personnal highlights have been:

2010 Arterberry-Maresh Weber Vineyard Pinot Noir
2010 Biggio-Hamina Deux Vert Pinot Noir
2010 Brick House Les Dijonnais Pinot Noir
2010 Lemelson Stermer Vineyard Pinot Noir
2010 Scott Paul Audrey Pinot Noir

The A-M Weber and S-P Audrey have the potential to be stunning.


Thanks for the advice. I will seek some of these out.

I noticed the Evening Land Seven Springs, Beaux Freres WV and Bergstrom Gregory Ranch at one of my LWSs. I figured I might start there.


----------
Sometimes I read a thread and think we ran out of stuff to talk about like 4 years ago. ~spo
 
Posts: 2878 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anyone tried the '10 or '11 Sineann Resonance?
I've enjoyed the '09 Willamette......
They were excited about the '12 in the tasting room last week......


Better Red Than Not!
 
Posts: 202 | Location: LA | Registered: Apr 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ruchin:
Anyone tried the '10 or '11 Sineann Resonance?


I've had the '10, but not the '11. Based on the 2010 Willamette Vally and 2010 Resonance, Sineann is on my list above. Both are quite nice, IMHO. However, for calibration purposes, I was not a big fan of either '09.

quote:
Originally posted by Ruchin:
They were excited about the '12 in the tasting room last week......


Everyone is excited about their '12's right now. Time will tell.
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had the 2010 St Innocent Pinot Noir Village Cuvee Willamette Valley tonight and it was austere yet nice and restrained.
 
Posts: 9404 | Location: minneapolis minnesota usa | Registered: Dec 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sharkey:
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Sharkey;

I agree! I haven't hadd any 10s that would be classified as thin, vegital, diluted, etc.

They are not fruit bomb pns, they are not high alcohol, but they are not thin or diluted. However, if you only like the high octane RRV style pinots, these may not be for you. I do believe the 2010 are far superior, overall, to the OR 07s.


I fully agree. Hopefully, tpb and lizardking will respond. There are uninteresting wines in every vintage, even the good ones. It is helpful to have an idea where, and where not to, focus ones attention.


Oops, I didn't realize the request was aimed at me. I didn't say thin and vegetal, I said tart, sour cherry tart :P

Kidding aside, all the wineries that tasted the '10 vintage from barrel were mediocre at best, IMO. I don't really want to bash wineries here, because in vintages like '08 I really like these guys and I do not want to deter those who like vintages like '10 from buying. I do my research and I don't often visit wineries that aren't highly recommended by people I trust, which are wineries that most Oregon lovers would visit on this weekend.

It may seem like I prefer warm vintages because I liked '09 over '10 and '06 over '07, but I didn't mean it that way. I was trying to put the tastings in perspective. I think '10 is a lot like '07 and if you don't like '07 you probably won't like '10.

To each his own and wine tasting is a matter of individual taste and experience. Personally, I prefer wines from Oregon in vintages like 2008, 2005, 2002 and 1998.


"This is the strangest life I've ever known."
 
Posts: 1352 | Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: Nov 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Lizardking;

Fair enough. I didn't like most of the 07s either, especially upon release. Some, to my surprise, have came around quite nicely however. I didn't buy much from that vintage.

I can understand your frustrations with the 10s. Mother Nature gave them a cool growing year, and the better producers produced some very elegant (not powerful) wines. Some of my favorites have been Evening Land, Domain Drouhin, Shea,and Brickhouse. All of these are drinking nicely now, but will improve with age. The BFs and Thomas wines, as typical, won't be ready to drink for years, but I'm sure they will be very enjoyable likewise. The early peeks I got at Domaine Serene showed some very promising wines likewise.
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by lizardking:
Kidding aside, all the wineries that tasted the '10 vintage from barrel were mediocre at best, IMO. I don't really want to bash wineries here, because in vintages like '08 I really like these guys and I do not want to deter those who like vintages like '10 from buying. . . . Personally, I prefer wines from Oregon in vintages like 2008, 2005, 2002 and 1998.


No one ever mentioned bashing wineries; thus, I'm at a loss to understand the jump to that statement. I too prefer '08, '05, '02 & '98 (4 of the better/best Oregon vintages in the past 15 years or so). Again, no one is claiming that '10 falls in this distinguished category. The comment from your original post was:

quote:
Originally posted by lizardking:
I did not get a good impression from the wines, the locals nor the wineries themselves and I, like redguy, am suspicious of the positive critical praise bestowed upon the vintage.


Your impression/experience is exactly 180 degrees the opposite of my recent winery visits and discussions with wine makers in Oregon. Thus, I am honestly attempting to understand the apparent disconnect. If a winery, themselves, thinks that they missed the mark in 2010, you are certainly not 'bashing' by simply conveying their, or your own, impressions. No wineries make the wine of the century every year, except, of course, the Bordelais. Wink
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Anyone open a Thomas for the team yet? Cool
 
Posts: 1112 | Location: Gig Harbor, WA | Registered: Apr 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Qhdeputy;

I might open one (Thomas 2010) for the team around Thanksgiving. 2018.

One a separate note. With Sparky's listing of the 08s as a great vintage (one that I believe is the best ever) several posters on the WB board were bashing the vintage/wines because they are/were not "drink now " wines. They pretty well all need time to come into their drinking window. Quite a few people there put the vintage down the list because of this factor. Some even suggested the vintage was a good as it would ever be upon release, and the wines would always be "not ready to drink". Different people have entirely different perspectives on wines and vintages.
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Qhdeputy:
Anyone open a Thomas for the team yet? Cool

I have not yet tasted it. However, in talking with those who have, the reports are that it is a bit backward and angular right now. (Not surprising, since it has not been in bottle very long.)
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
One a separate note. With Sparky's listing of the 08s as a great vintage (one that I believe is the best ever) . . .

Who's Sparky?
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sharkey:
quote:
Originally posted by Qhdeputy:
Anyone open a Thomas for the team yet? Cool

I have not yet tasted it. However, in talking with those who have, the reports are that it is a bit backward and angular right now. (Not surprising, since it has not been in bottle very long.)


Figured as much, wasn't sure compared to other vintages at this stage. I have some started buying in 09, so if anyone has a couple of 08 to share I would appreciate it. Qhdeputy at me.com.
 
Posts: 1112 | Location: Gig Harbor, WA | Registered: Apr 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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hey sandy

what's yer email?

have a few questions to ask you about some pinots.
or email me at ghiman at that goog mail


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 11853 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Qhdeputy;
Hi there!

I might open one (Thomas 2010) for the team around Thanksgiving. 2018.

One a separate note. With Sparky's listing of the 08s as a great vintage (one that I believe is the best ever) several posters on the WB board were bashing the vintage/wines because they are/were not "drink now " wines. They pretty well all need time to come into their drinking window. Quite a few people there put the vintage down the list because of this factor. Some even suggested the vintage was a good as it would ever be upon release, and the wines would always be "not ready to drink". Different people have entirely different perspectives on wines and vintages.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: Nov 11, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sharkey;

Smack

Sorry Eek
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No worries, Sandy. This brought a smile to my face. When I was in college, there was a girl at one of the local sorority houses, whose nickname was Sparky. But, I digress. Big Grin
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tell me more, tell me more!
 
Posts: 1896 | Registered: Jul 17, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:
Lizardking;

Fair enough. I didn't like most of the 07s either, especially upon release. Some, to my surprise, have came around quite nicely however. I didn't buy much from that vintage.

I can understand your frustrations with the 10s. Mother Nature gave them a cool growing year, and the better producers produced some very elegant (not powerful) wines. Some of my favorites have been Evening Land, Domain Drouhin, Shea,and Brickhouse. All of these are drinking nicely now, but will improve with age. The BFs and Thomas wines, as typical, won't be ready to drink for years, but I'm sure they will be very enjoyable likewise. The early peeks I got at Domaine Serene showed some very promising wines likewise.


I am sure there are at least a few wines from the vintage I will like. I do prefer more delicate styles of pinot, which is why I go to the WV to taste. I just didn't taste anything I enjoyed from '10 during the barrel tasting weekend. It should also be known that the weather extremely cold over the weekend which may have made the high acid wines taste more angular and closed. Unfortunately of the wineries on your list, we only went to Brickhouse, and they were still pouring the '09's (which were terrific, IMO).

I wouldn't be surprised if some wines have put on weight since then, but as a general rule for me, I'm skipping the vintage unless I find something nice. I will see if I can get my hands on one of the wineries you mentioned.


"This is the strangest life I've ever known."
 
Posts: 1352 | Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: Nov 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sharkey,

You are right, I should be able to post the wineries that I didn't like without having to "bash" them. I know I said that, but it isn't really what I meant. This is a public forum and I respect winemakers' business by not publicly announcing which wineries to stay away from (even if it is in the context of a single vintage, it may not always be used that way).

If you want to know which wineries I went to, I would be happy to send you my notes privately.


"This is the strangest life I've ever known."
 
Posts: 1352 | Location: SF Bay Area | Registered: Nov 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lizardking -- Thanks for the reply and offer. It's probably more hassle than it's worth to get into more detail. Let's move on. There's plenty of good wine in Oregon. I'm sure that out taste buds will find something to agree upon.
 
Posts: 1544 | Location: STL | Registered: Dec 22, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Any of you guys try EIEIO?

if someone can email me at ghiman at googs' mail dot com


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 11853 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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First 2010 note Here.

2010 Evening Land Seven Springs Vnyd. La Source


----------
Sometimes I read a thread and think we ran out of stuff to talk about like 4 years ago. ~spo
 
Posts: 2878 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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2010 Bergstrom Gregory Ranch Here.


----------
Sometimes I read a thread and think we ran out of stuff to talk about like 4 years ago. ~spo
 
Posts: 2878 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was amused to see that a small group seems to have beat-up this topic for 2-weeks and then got tired. So, now that it is a new year, here's my two cents on a few points; perhaps the debate will restart?...:

The comparison of 2010 to 2007 is a good comparison, generally. Contrasting 2010 at this stage vs. 2007 at a similar stage, I think the edge goes to 2010. The wines are a little cleaner, a little fresher, and I think a bit deeper and more viscous. Interestingly, the alcohol is lower.

From a grower's perspective: 2007 had relatively heavy crop levels, plenty of heat up to the end of September, then cold and wet with picking necessarily occurring, in most cases, in mid-Oct. On the other hand, 2010 exhibited low crop levels, which were then intentionally reduced further out of fear and passion. The weather was cooler throughout the season, but we did not get slaughtered with rain in the Fall, and the picking occurred at the very end of October. Those that didn't have good bird control programs got hurt badly (since we're surrounded on 4-sides by forest, we have an aggressive program, so birds were not a problem for us).

To the variance referenced above regarding some of the winemaker comments, I think when it comes to 2010, because it was so cold (low degree day accumulation, even thru late October), winemakers were naturally concerned about the ripeness of the fruit. Pinot being Pinot, has a special way of making fools of us all-- it moves around a lot during its development. In a year like 2010, depending on the day and the winemaker that you catch on that day, you can get very different feedback that is largely based on the last data point of the winemaker. I am certainly guilty of being on a roller coaster ride with the 2010s-- fearing a bashing by the critics a la their substantially misguided views of 2007 (but alas, we all seem to have learned from that...). On a bad day, I have not been enthusiastic about the vintage, on a good day, I find the vintage quite exciting. I think others share this same experience, and that is what driving some of the disparate comments above.

We should not forget that there are wines from various regions of the world that are simply known to need bottle age; no one would ever (optimistically) think of pulling the cork on a traditionally made 2010 Brunello (even if you could get your hands on one), yet there is this expectation that we should be able to drink, or at a minimum, "taste", a 2010 Oregon PN and know exactly what it will be-- there is an expectation that OR PN reveals itself at a young age, but that is not always the case. As I said above, Pinot likes to make fools of many of us-- it disappoints, and delights, as it chooses. And when it is a young wine from a cool year, it often is more reticent to reveal it's future character; while a ripe-year Pinot blushes with its basic identity early-on.

There is a lesson to be learned from the 2007s-- the good ones grew up to be wonderful wines... (and those of you that can remember, so did the 1993 Oregon wines). But that view will only be shared IF you have a preference for Pinot that shows the "pretty" side of what PN can be. Oppositely, die-hard ripe-cab-drinkers will almost certainly never like an '07-- then and now. On this particular day, at this particular moment, I'm thinking that our 2010s will grow up to be very credible wines, and I'm much more confident of that than I was 6-months ago. I suspect other producers 2010s are behaving in a similar manner.


Tom M
Le Cadeau & Aubichon
 
Posts: 769 | Location: Now PDX; Was MSP | Registered: Dec 11, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm planning on opening one of the 2010's that we brought home from our vacation this past fall with dinner tomorrow. I'll try and remember to take good notes and post here.
 
Posts: 5401 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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