WineSpectator.com    Wine Spectator Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Wine Conversations    Thanksgiving wine list
Page 1 2 3 
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Thanksgiving wine list
 Login/Join 
Member
posted
Well, it's that time of year again when I start pondering the Turkey Day wine list. I am in a convenient position where I "cook" the wine for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Just wondering, what is everyone leaning toward this Thanksgiving?

I usually bring around 12 bottles, one or two of which being for dessert.

Louisiana is a year-round Rose state, and we like to sip on some as we're out frying the turkey! I'm leaning this year in the direction of the following two:

Dinastia Vivanco Rioja Tepranillo-Garnacha Rose 2011

Wirra Wirra Mrs. Wigley Grenache Rose 2012

What are some of your best/most surprising Thanksgiving pairing decisions, or what are you leaning toward this year?

(And nobody say Beajolais Nouveau!)


Ἐν οἴνῳ ἀλήθεια
En Vino Veritas
 
Posts: 289 | Location: New Orleans, LA | Registered: Dec 14, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Our thanksgiving is not with family but ratHer with friends that we consider family. None of us are americans so we don't have families here. It is always 4 couples and two of the women are currently pregnant leaving only 6 drinkers. We are all basically newbies and this year I am planning a mini mini vertical 07,08, 09 and 10 Sta Lucia Highland Pinot tasting. Idea is to have a bit of a guessing game with my friends to make it kind of educational. Dessert wine will be either a 1997 Suiduirat or 05 Rieussec.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1447 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
For us..It's usually..
Champagne
German Riesling
Sonoma or Oregon Pinot Noir
Vintage Port
I love this time of year!


"A bottle of wine contains more advice then any self help book in the world"
 
Posts: 1030 | Location: Around Boston | Registered: Nov 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I will start thinking about the wines the Wednesday before, but Champagne always.

I'm not a fan of the food served at Thanksgiving, so always try to make sure I enjoy the wine. Big Grin
 
Posts: 29479 | Location: Dallas, TX & Santa Fe, NM | Registered: Feb 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
...Champagne always.

Hear hear (or is that here here? Winner )!
 
Posts: 15102 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Son-in-law hits his cellar.
Normally Champagne
Pinot
Some Super Tuscans
And later prt or other dessert wine.

I normally don't get a say in the selections.

Other Son in law a bit more low keyed. Bogle Shiraz and some other cabs. No champers, maybe Italian sparkler. [He is a 2nd generation Italian] But a gteat cook & baker


__________________
Ed Bowers
Live simply, Laugh often, Wine a lot!!!
 
Posts: 6104 | Location: Palm Beach Gardens FL | Registered: Nov 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I usually start thinking about it when I go to grab a bottle on Thanksgiving Day. It really depends on who we're having dinner with and whether we're cooking or going out. If it's family, probably some kind of Riesling will be involved and after that who knows.

Usually we stick with American wines. Of course, we do that for Bastille Day too. Just because. But within those parameters, there's no real energy expended on thinking about the wine. We even opened a Pinot Noir once. That would have been around 18 years ago. It was OK.


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2465 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
2007 Albert Mann Furstentum Riesling for sure.
 
Posts: 9262 | Location: minneapolis minnesota usa | Registered: Dec 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Probably Pinot Noir for red wine drinkers, Riesling and Oregon Pinot Gris for white wine drinkers.


I always wanted to be a procrastinator.
 
Posts: 584 | Location: Maryland | Registered: Mar 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Usually gewurz and pinot.


"Wine, one sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits in delight beyond the bliss of dreams. Be wise and taste."
- Milton
 
Posts: 3342 | Location: NW Suburbs of Chicago | Registered: Aug 16, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Some Pinot and some Riesling, figure that part out when we get closer.


GG
 
Posts: 265 | Location: Galveston, TX | Registered: Apr 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
We'll be going to my son's in-law's. I'll bring something good in my own self-interest. Probably a CA Chard and WA Rhone.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36395 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
We don't do turkey that often so I am guessing lamb. Overdue for a St. Joseph. Woot
 
Posts: 8506 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Lamb for Thanksgiving? Confused

Holy crap Spo! That's just heresy. Couldn't you at least do venison?


"The best part is how he said the ENGLISH language. Fine irony. Use American next time."
 
Posts: 2465 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Lamb has a great holiday feel to it, Greg. Thanksgiving, Easter, Christmas, it is right at home on any one of those tables.
 
Posts: 8506 | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I don't take anything over about $15 bucks. My family doesn't care, and I'm not spending more than that when a ten dollar bottle will do fine.

Kendall-Jackson basic Chardonnay for one of my sisters, inexpensive PN like Mirassou, Columbia Crest GE merlot and chard, and whatever $10 Cava I find on the shelves.

I love spending Thanksgiving with my family, and drinking something expensive won't add to my happiness on this holiday. If I want something a little tastier, I'll get a good bottle of Belgian beer.


-IB

"Wine only turns into alcohol if you let it sit."---Lindsay Bluth
 
Posts: 8848 | Location: The Circle City | Registered: Nov 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'm much like GregT (surprise). We have kind of a 'refugee' Thanksgiving every year with lots of friends who don't have family close coming over. They usually bring wine with them and I don't worry about any type of pairing. I do encourage people to bring American wine, it's our holiday after all.

I always do Bordeaux though on the 4th of July.


Paul Romero (tlily)- Owner, Winemaker, Tour Guide
Stefania Wine
http://www.stefaniawine.com
 
Posts: 7524 | Location: San Jose | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
My contributions will be:

2005 Bergstrom Pinot Noir Willamette Valley
2006 Owen Roe Pinot Noir Santa Maria Valley
2001 L'Ecole Syrah Seven Hills Vineyard


Cheers!
 
Posts: 2780 | Location: Seattle, WA, USA | Registered: Mar 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
ive slowly converted my closest family (parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc...) into psuedo wine snobs over the last 10 years so we'll be drinking good this turkey day...

'10 Tercero Grenache Blanc
'10 Tercero Viognier
'10 Tercero Mourvedre Rose
'08 Tercero Cuvee Christie
'10 Liquid Farm Rose
'10 Dragonette Rose SYV
'11 Dragonette Sauv Blanc SYV (mag)
'09 Dragonette Syrah

will probably be a couple bottles of each except the mag of Dragonette SB and the LF Rose
 
Posts: 4182 | Location: Southern Calif | Registered: Jul 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Has anybody read Matt Kramer's article in the latest issue of WS? He brings up some excellent points in regards to this topic.
 
Posts: 1281 | Location: Murrieta, CA | Registered: Mar 14, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I haven't decided on a Riesling yet. Reds will likely be

2003 Robert Jayer-Gilles Bourgogne Haut Cotes de Beaune
2005 Loring Brosseau Vineyard Pinot
2002 Chehalem Stoller Vineyard Pinot


“Appreciating old wine is like making love to a very old lady. It is possible. It can even be enjoyable. But it requires a bit of imagination.”

Andre Tchelistcheff
 
Posts: 2563 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
We are hosting thanksgiving for the first time in our newish home. Most people in attendance are not that into wine, but that is no reason to punish them and especially myself with average or boring wine! I’ll probably pop a champagne, white from Tablas Creek, CA pinot and maybe a nice Beaujolais. Really looking forward to a couple of days off to just cook and drink wine after a tough couple of months at work.
 
Posts: 6209 | Location: OC, CA  | Registered: Aug 01, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Over the years I have gradually given up trying to get the extended family and friends to enjoy Riesling with Thanksgiving dinner. In addition, all old world selections, whether red or white, have met with indifference. The exception is Champagne to go before the meal.

The consensus favorite is Pinot Noir from Oregon, or California as an acceptable alternative. Actually, they will drink whatever is put on the table, but its easy to tell which bottles get drained the quickest.
 
Posts: 2226 | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'll add my +N for Champagne. And please make sure you enjoy it (or a second bottle Smile) with the meal rather than (just) as an appertif.

Frequently I'll go with a Pinot on the other side of the plate.
 
Posts: 2877 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: Nov 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Huet petillant or other cremant de Loire
Cru Beaujolais
Maybe some OR PN
Vouvray or other Chenin

Won't bring out the top players in any of these categories as they might get run over, with the exception of the Huet as a starter.
 
Posts: 477 | Registered: Mar 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2 3  
 

WineSpectator.com    Wine Spectator Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Wine Conversations    Thanksgiving wine list

© Wine Spectator 2013