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Any Oregon reds besides Pinot, anyone?
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A number of people have been to Oregon recently and visited wineries and everything mentioned seemed to be pinot noir.

I know Foris makes some wines form merlot and cab and I hear of the occasional syrah but it seems rare.

Is there anything red from Oregon that is not pinot noir that anybody here likes?
 
Posts: 8761 | Location: North CA | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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spo - most of the non-pinot noir reds I tasted on my recent trip were from WA state. I do remember trying a fairly tasty Tempranillo (very Toro-like) from Bryn Mawr that was estate grown in Eola Amity Hills.


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Posts: 2989 | Location: San Diego | Registered: Jan 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Syrah. In fact, I think they should plant that instead of Pinot Noir - it's a nicer grape and they should be able to do it well without making it a jammy syrup.

Penner Ash does one, Del Rio in Rogue Valley does one, and Tallulah does both a Syrah and a Grenache from the Del Rio vineyard and they're pretty good. (In fact, Tallulah is IMO a pretty decent producer all around. Their Bald Mountain Syrah from Napa is a seriously tannic mountain Syrah that's unlike most from CA - it's not sweet or jammy at all. Not to everyone's taste perhaps, but I wish there were more Syrah like that. Actually needs age and I can't think of many others from Napa, or even CA, in that category.)

And Zin - Sineann Old Vine Zinfandel is pretty good. Again, they can get a different iteration of Zin - people think all Zin has to be inky and thick but that's only because it's grown in a relatively small area and that's our context for it. In fact, it can make a rather interesting medium bodied wine.

And there are smaller plantings of Barbera and Tempranillo and regarding the latter, I think that's a grape that needs more attention in Oregon and Washington. Parts of Oregon remind me a lot of Ribera del Duero and the Abacela Tempranillo is pretty good.

It's cool that you want to try something other than Pinot Noir from Oregon - I think it's a mistake for the state to be so closely identified with that one grape.


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Posts: 2663 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by GregT:

Penner Ash does one, Del Rio in Rogue Valley does one, and Tallulah does both a Syrah and a Grenache from the Del Rio vineyard and they're pretty good. (In fact, Tallulah is IMO a pretty decent producer all around. Their Bald Mountain Syrah from Napa is a seriously tannic mountain Syrah that's unlike most from CA - it's not sweet or jammy at all. Not to everyone's taste perhaps, but I wish there were more Syrah like that. Actually needs age and I can't think of many others from Napa, or even CA, in that category.)



I think the only OR Syrah I've had was the 2008 Penner-Ash. It was very good; wish I'd bought more than 1 while I was there.


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Posts: 8575 | Location: Vancouver, BC | Registered: Oct 17, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Second the Syrah made by Penner Ash. Had it very recently and it was quite nice. The grapes come from southern OR. Also, Ponzi makes a Dolcetto that was good.
 
Posts: 5519 | Location: Aurora, IL | Registered: Jul 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Syrah - Cayuse (and others) sources from the Oregon side of Walla Walla
Tempranillo - Abacela makes some nice Temp in the Umpqua Valley of S. Oregon


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Posts: 248 | Location: Littleton, CO | Registered: Aug 10, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are a few vineyards in the Willamette Valley that grow Syrah. Cristom makes one. I had another at a tasting that was very Northern Rhone like. Right now the name escapes me, but I read recently that they were discontinuing the wine.

For red grapes other than Pinot you can look to other growing areas.

The Rogue Valley is quite warm, and many Willamette Valley wineries source grapes there. Tyrus Evan is a Ken Wright project that makes good use of Del Rio Syrah. Rock Block is a label Domaine Serene uses.

The Seven Hills area south of Walla Walla is one of my favorite for new world Syrahs. The wines come out lighter and more subtle than the Rogue heavyweights, and even different from the rocky riverbed soil used by Cayuse. I love the term, I think I heard here, for this area of Oregon that is best known for wines made in Walla Walla-
Occupied Territory.

The Umqua Valley has Merlot and Syrah mixed in with PN, and the Applegate Valley has Syrah and many Spanish grape varieties.

The Columbia Gorge is fairly well known for Pinot Noirs made popular by Sineann, but there is Syrah grown on the Oregon side also. Dominio IV makes Syrahs from a vineyard near Hood River that is worth seeking out.
 
Posts: 2318 | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've had a few Syrah from Oregon with the most recent being the Rock Block that Pape mentioned. I recently had past vintages of their offerings from Del Rio and Seven Hills, and enjoyed both.


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Posts: 2801 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While I was in Oregon, I carried the following my restaurant wine list:

Ransom Grenache
Evening Land Gamay
Brick House Gamay
 
Posts: 2259 | Location: Napa | Registered: Oct 26, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Living here in Southern Oregon we have a lot of offerings. Check out the following online.

Cowhorn... Syrah, Grenache.
Quady North..Syrah, Cab Franc
Abacela... Tempranillo
Ledger David..Sangiovese
Roxy Ann... Claret, Cab, Merlot, Cab Franc.
Del Rio... Cabernet
Kriselle Cellars... Tempranillo

Especially pay attention to Cowhorn. Truly great wines. Very small production.
 
Posts: 404 | Registered: Nov 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks guys.
 
Posts: 8761 | Location: North CA | Registered: May 28, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oregon Syrah? Lillian!
 
Posts: 905 | Location: San Francisco Bay Area | Registered: Aug 30, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cowhorn Vineyard in the Applegate Valley has been mentioned several times in WS, and it seems Matt Kramer is a fan of the wines. I checked their reviews and they received 91 points for one of their syrahs,and they have only been making wine for a couple of years. I also subscribe to the wine advocate and noticed that one of their syrahs received 93 points and two others received 92 points. There grenache also received 92 points. The crazy thing is that a lot of people I know refer to them as being white wine producers.
 
Posts: 8 | Location: Portland Oregon | Registered: Feb 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by LovethatVino:
Cowhorn Vineyard in the Applegate Valley has been mentioned several times in WS, and it seems Matt Kramer is a fan of the wines. I checked their reviews and they received 91 points for one of their syrahs,and they have only been making wine for a couple of years. I also subscribe to the wine advocate and noticed that one of their syrahs received 93 points and two others received 92 points. There grenache also received 92 points. The crazy thing is that a lot of people I know refer to them as being white wine producers.


They came onto the scene about 5 years ago when I met with Bill and Barbara and had me sample their Viognier just before their first release and they followed it with Spiral 36 white blend. I think those were the first wines that hit the Portland market..they are doing some amazing things!
 
Posts: 404 | Registered: Nov 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sineann puts out a cab with fruit from the Walla Walla area and so does Zebra
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: Oct 01, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by GregT:
Syrah. In fact, I think they should plant that instead of Pinot Noir - it's a nicer grape and they should be able to do it well without making it a jammy syrup.


I'm confused; are you implying that OR PN tends towards jammy syrup? I find this confusing because most of the OR PN producers I buy from produce more delicate wines, certainly far more restrained than CA. From classics like Eyrie to more recent domaines like Evesham or Westry (or a dozen others) there are tons there I don't associate with jam. Of course you do mention Penner Ash, and I seem to recall that they produce bigger wines, but it's been awhile. Also, I do think OR has huge vintage variations, with years like 2006 being trouble.

I recently read a post on WB about Eyrie and a few other producers in OR making, of all things, very good still Pinot Meunier. I've also hear interesting things about Gamay, though I've never had one.

In my opinion it is these sorts of off the beaten path varietals that seem to hold promise for OR. I'd like to see things like Poulsard, Savignin, maybe other obscure varietals.

I just don't know that we need another large source of Syrah, and I don't know that the market is there. But if they could somehow approach the qualities of the N Rhone in a way that other New World syrah regions fail to do, then I would quickly change my tune.
 
Posts: 477 | Registered: Mar 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Not suggesting that OR PN tends towards jammy syrup at all.

Just suggesting that as the OR PNs tend to be a bit leaner, so should Syrah. Especially as opposed to Syrah from hotter regions and consequently is a grape OR should be able to do well. There's sometimes a polarity between the leaner styles from N. Rhone and the riper, juicier styles from CA and Australia and I was thinking that OR Syrah should be able to straddle that nicely and so far, from what I've had, they can. And as I almost always would rather drink Syrah than PN, I'm hoping for more of it.

Fully agree w your other comments and respect any attempt to do something other than Cab/Merlot/PN/Syrah - it takes a lot of guts to try selling something that has no market presence. But I'll support those who try.


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Posts: 2663 | Location: NY | Registered: Dec 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah, that makes far more sense. Yes, I'd think they'd have a far better chance at hitting all of the wonderfully complex non-fruit flavors that Syrah is capable of better than other new world regions, at least in certain vintages.
 
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