Page 1 2 3 
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Buying trends
 Login/Join 
Member
posted
I've stopped buying red Bordeaux as of the 2009 vintage. I'm old enough that I might be a drooling vegetable by the time some of them are ready. My cellar is full, but I still buy some wine, almost all of it from the Rhone- Rene Rostaing Cote-Rotie, Pierre Usseglio CdPs, and a broad selection of Northern and Southern Rhone wines. I'm also buying Champagne, premier and cru red Burgundies, Chablis, some Central Coast and Washington Rhone varietals, Spanish reds and whites, and a broad selection of Rhone and California whites. I have plenty of Bordeaux (red and sweet white), Germans, and California reds on hand that are aging.

Have other people's buying trends changed, and are they due to age or changing tastes? Mine are due to both. I can't wait to return to the Rhone.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36766 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
No Italians?
 
Posts: 1599 | Location: Toronto | Registered: Aug 21, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'm still pretty young, so early in the learning curve...mine has been:

California > CA central coast > Sonoma > Oregon > Washington > Italian > No Italian > Rhone > Bordeaux > Burgundy > too expensive > back to US...to be continued...
 
Posts: 854 | Location: Chicago | Registered: Aug 04, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Not far off from you Board-O, also mostly due to age and 'value'. I will not pay today's prices that Bordeaux demand. I seek purchase good vintage wines with excellent provenance (with age comes....). Not so much Calif. whites. That $ goes, by far, much more to French whites (Chablis and white Burgundy).

Not much Germans but LOTS of Champagne Woot
 
Posts: 15428 | Location: Montreal, QC | Registered: Feb 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Oh, I'm loaded up with Bordeaux, but I've stopped buying them.


Just one more sip.
 
Posts: 36766 | Location: NY | Registered: Oct 18, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I am loaded with Bordeaux and stopped as of 2009 as well....prices are insane. I am only 35 and have hundreds and hundreds of bottles of them....I don't care if I miss a "vintage of the century" anymore.....better wine other places and cheaper
I am ALL burgundy, Barolo, northern Rhone and Rhys.....
Tuscany has almost got no place now except for a few brunellos from fuligni and Il poggione.
Champagne is always a must!
 
Posts: 1132 | Registered: Apr 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
white burgundy


"A bottle of wine contains more advice then any self help book in the world"
 
Posts: 1038 | Location: Around Boston | Registered: Nov 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Rather young in my collecting profile. Hit early with buying Bordeaux, Rhone and Port. Progressed to Big Boy Cabs from Cali, then Languedoc. Now I'm in a light Burgundy/Barolo heavy Rhone buying spree.


"Some men are Baptists, others Catholics; my father was an Oldsmobile man"
 
Posts: 58 | Location: Chicago | Registered: Oct 26, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I've switched to cocaine...it's much cheaper.
 
Posts: 1282 | Registered: May 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
My buying is much slower than it used to be. I look in my cellar and I can find something ready to drink now, and I can't imagine why I need much more!

I bought a few low end 2009 bdx, that would be the only thing I'd imagine buying in the future as well (Saw 2009 Pontet Canet offered at close to $300 recently, that's insane).

The only wines I continue to buy are:
Stefania
Brunello from good vintages
A smattering of piedmont wines (large italian hole in my cellar, just trying to keep up)
Rhone reds (value is here for sure)
Burgundy when I can figure out what to buy, which is rare.

All in all my buying volume is way down and my willingness to drink from my cellar is way up. Why the hell not? The world is ending in just over a month anyways...


*******
Go Habs Go
 
Posts: 5560 | Location: Chicago | Registered: May 24, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by AML:
I've switched to cocaine...it's much cheaper.


i've switched to codeine, jail time is considerably less.


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 11856 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I have gone from mostly CA cabs to amost none and now focus heavily on CDP, other Rhone regions, Loire, Alsace, Spain with recent interest in red and white burgundy thanks to my wife!
 
Posts: 2542 | Location: Danville, CA | Registered: Apr 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Re-discovering regions that i used to buy long ago, such as Languedoc-Roussillon or Kaiserstuhl
Buying less wines for long-term aging (enough long agers in the cellar already)
Buying wines from less prominent regions in Spain and Italy
Buying less bottles and buying less expensive wines


There is nothing in our intelligence that has not passed by the senses. (Aristoteles)
 
Posts: 1870 | Location: Luxemburg | Registered: Nov 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I buy whatever "falls off the truck"....... Wink
 
Posts: 814 | Location: San Francisco Bay Area | Registered: Aug 30, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Started with Bordeaux, Australian Shiraz and Port. I was priced out of the Bordeaux market and moved away from Australia as my tastes changed. I am still buying any good Port that I can afford. Now I am buying as much CDP before prices start to rocket up. I really feel there are some excellent values and really interesting wines coming out of the Rhone region. I initially snubbed the California Cabs, but I have recently become enamoured with them as well.
 
Posts: 128 | Registered: Nov 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I am in a very early stage of my collection and I am 28, so I have lots of time. That being said, I cannot see the reason to buy Bordeaux because prices are crazy. Right now I am loving everything from the Rhone, especially CDP, since it ages well in good vintages and it is a lot easier on the wallet. I also love trying any Rhone varietals elsewhere, except down under.

Other region: slowly into Cali Cab(a bit pricey up here), Washington State (really want to plan a trip!) and any Pinot!
 
Posts: 253 | Location: Burlington, Ontario | Registered: Apr 04, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I think it's somewhat funny that the repliers all shun bordeaux. I suppose I'm "lucky" enough to have just missed when classified BDX was affordable. Maybe it still was when I first started collecting, at least in the secondary market, but I didn't know enough to take a strong position. The luck of it in not being disappointed by what I can no longer afford, but instead looking for the value plays in the region, of which there are many. I don't focus on BDX, but it's hard to imagine having a cellar without a strong showing for the region.

For me I have reduced burg purchases in favor of Loire and N Rhone. Mainly a question of value and of the time commitment required to mature the burgundy. I'm sure I'll regret it some day.
 
Posts: 477 | Registered: Mar 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I seem to change my buying strategy every year with some constants. I won't be buying much German as I have a fair amount nor Calif. Pinot as I don't like it that much. Also won't be buying too much Italian. I will be concentrating on Burgundy, a little Oregon Pinot, Rhones (want to explore their whites more but price and availability is an issue), Calif. Syrah (though probably have enough to take a year or two off), and I'd like to explore Spain some. A fair amount of my budget will go toward Keplinger wines (only mailing list I'm on) while I can "afford" them as they just raised prices and another one will probably send me looking elsewhere. I'd like to buy more Washington too, but some of my old stand-bys are getting pricy and others I'm interested in I have trouble finding east of the Mississippi. As for Bordeaux, a few cheapies here or there but the top guns have always been out of my price range. If I stick to my plan (and budget) this year, I'm going to reward myself with a bottle or two of something just outside my normal price range. I would suspect those bottles would be S. Rhone or Bordeaux.


“Appreciating old wine is like making love to a very old lady. It is possible. It can even be enjoyable. But it requires a bit of imagination.”

Andre Tchelistcheff
 
Posts: 2713 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Jan 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Going for QPR as a rule. Avoid long aging wines as I do not expcet to be around to drink them. I age faster than the wines. Avoid cult wines and high priced collectibles. My drinking window is at about 3 years, no longer. Want to have only one bottle in cellar before I go. LOL


Live simply, Laugh often, Wine a lot!!!
 
Posts: 6282 | Location: Palm Beach Gardens FL | Registered: Nov 05, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
mm, I still buy alot of port, but I've certainly seen the light of jburman's buying strategy which is bying quality instead of quantity.

i've pretty much given up on all red bordeaux (last vintage was 2005)

My list
Semillon based white bordeaux
oregon pinot
port
cali cabs
cali merlots


This is my sig -> www.brownteacup.com
www.wsqwine.com
(Wine distributor)
 
Posts: 11856 | Location: NYC | Registered: Feb 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I"m still young enough to buy new Bordeaux but at about 33% of my cellar it is well represented already. The majority of my Bordeaux is from '00, '01, '05, '09 & '10 so I will cherry pick from here on out.

I have a lot of S.Rhone and will continue to buy but am moving my focus more and more to N.Rhone, Reds and Whites. That is the biggest shift. I expect Rhone to account for more than 33% of my total purchases over the next year or so and probably closer to 75% of all new vintage purchases. Add in some Champagnes and new German's and I expect that will be the vast majority of my "new" wine purchases going forward in 2013.

The other half of my buying trend will be older vintage purchasing through auctions and online. Here it will be more of a mix with pre-2000 Cali, older stickies, port, Rhone and Bordeaux (probably in that order) represented.


Looking forward to those mags of '08 Salon.
 
Posts: 2286 | Location: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Bdx: I'm still buying 99 ,01, and 05, but current release purchases have been significantly reduced.

Burg: Buying everything...I just can't help myself!

Loire: Some SB for aperitif.

Most other categories have slowed to a trickle.



Got acid?
@@@@@@@@@@@@
Everyone has to believe in something. I believe I’ll have another glass of wine.
 
Posts: 1439 | Location: Redstate USA | Registered: Mar 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I started with Napa cabs and they still hold the majority of my cellar, but I've fallen in love with grenache/syrahs from all major regions (Cali, WA, France). In California, I've really bought as much as I could from Bedrock, Favia, and Keplinger. But being fairly new to the game, I've found myself giving up the current vintage purchases, and trying to get some older vintages. Fortunately (or for my kids' college fund, unfortunately), I've been able to pick up some nice late 90's Napa cabs and some late 90 S. and N. Rhones. I'd like to increase the amount of nice Bordeaux and Burgundy wines (either new for cellaring, or old for drinking), but the price tag seems a bit much for me at this stage of my wine odyssey. Luckily I've got some nice San Diegans who are generous enough to share those wines at offlines, and for now, that is good enough for me.
 
Posts: 182 | Location: San Diego | Registered: May 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I am all over the place. A few years ago I used to buy Chilean reds, Argentinian Malbec and NAPA Cabs (but the overoaky Napa Cab). A transition phase and getting enamored with Pinot Noir made me buy lots of California Pinots. This has changed to Oregon Pinot now, and although I am still buying Napa Cabs, it is a different style now that I like. The chilean and argentinian have been replaced by Rhone Varietals from the US, France and Spain.


"The hardest thing to attain ... is the appreciation of difference without insisting on superiority" George Saintsbury
 
Posts: 1547 | Location: DC Suburbs, Potomac MD. | Registered: Dec 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'd like to buy more Champagne. I've depleted my 3-bottle inventory. I wish white Burgundy was in the price range as Loire. Half-bottles of d'Yquem from the off years.

I would still buy my share of Stefania (Crimson Clover and the Eaglepoint Syrah are my faves). No other reds though in the immediate future. 2005 Bordeaux was the last vintage for me.
 
Posts: 5092 | Location: New Jersey | Registered: Aug 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2 3  
 


© Wine Spectator 2013